New Part Description Files

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Hi all, I'm stuck in the Dark Ages on AS4.19 and am coding for an ATXMEGA128A1U. Can anyone help me find a suitable XML part description file?

PS - Before suggesting I upgrade from AS4, I do like the Dark Ages :wink:

Electronic components work on the principle of smoke; I know this because when I let the smoke out, they stop working. Also, sanity is over-rated.

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I now know you like the dark ages.

I still suggest upgrading. :wink:

Or even a parallel install, e.g. of the latest Atmel Studio. With that you should get all the XML part files there are. Heck, they should even be present in the Studio-less Atmel Toolchain, if you'd like to keep your d/l time short(ish).

http://www.atmel.se/tools/ATMELA...

As of January 15, 2018, Site fix-up work has begun! Now do your part and report any bugs or deficiencies here

No guarantees, but if we don't report problems they won't get much of  a chance to be fixed! Details/discussions at link given just above.

 

"Some questions have no answers."[C Baird] "There comes a point where the spoon-feeding has to stop and the independent thinking has to start." [C Lawson] "There are always ways to disagree, without being disagreeable."[E Weddington] "Words represent concepts. Use the wrong words, communicate the wrong concept." [J Morin] "Persistence only goes so far if you set yourself up for failure." [Kartman]

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AFAIK you cannot use an AS6 XML file with AS4 as I think they changed the internal data format.

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JohanEkdahl wrote:
...even a parallel install, e.g. of the latest Atmel Studio. With that you should get all the XML part files there are. Heck, they should even be present in the Studio-less Atmel Toolchain, if you'd like to keep your d/l time short(ish).

Thanks JohanEkdahl, I downloaded and installed the latest toolchain but that doesn't contain any part description files. They seem to be with the Studio IDE.

Next I downloaded and installed AS6.1, and found its version of the part description file for the target device, (as well as separate XML files for the part and each supported programmer).

But as clawson suggests, the file formats are very different indeed.

I have developed a lot of useful code modules on the ATXMEGA64A3U in AS4, but the latest project needs more resources so I've upgraded to the 128A1U. I didn't think it should be so hard to migrate to a larger part of the same family. I've just received the first assembled PCBs, so now the clock is ticking on getting code running to verify the hardware design, so the last thing I need is the learning curve of a completely different IDE, built on an entirely different base (MS Visual Studio).

Is there anyone out there who has coded with AS4 for the 128A1U?

Does anyone have AS5 installed and can post a copy of its atxmega128a1u.xml, so I can see if that has a format closer to that of AS4?

I'm not using the USB module, so for now I'll try using the 128A1 file and see if that works. There are quite a few differences between the 64A3 and 64A3U files in AS4, so I will need a correct 128A1U file to complete the job.

Electronic components work on the principle of smoke; I know this because when I let the smoke out, they stop working. Also, sanity is over-rated.

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Silly question but why on earth wouldn't you simply switch to 6.2, it's superior to AS4 in every way.

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clawson wrote:
Silly question but why on earth wouldn't you simply switch to 6.2, it's superior to AS4 in every way.

Because it's not a cost-free switch.

- The solution structure is more complex and takes more file space than simple AS4 projects;

- Because I work largely alone on software, I have no need for a formal VCS like Vault, so I simply store snapshots by taking copies of the project structure, and the unnecessary extra complexity gives me no benefit;

- Simple things like iterative device programming are a doddle in AS4, just leave the programming dialogue open and click one button - my limited observation of AS5/6 is that it's far from so simple;

- I just don't like the MS Visual Studio substrate for the IDE - personal preference;

It may well be that the benefits of switching to AS6 outweigh the costs, (I do like the tool-tip aids for example), but I have to invest in the cost of climbing the learning curve to find out, so I will give it a try when I can. :P

Electronic components work on the principle of smoke; I know this because when I let the smoke out, they stop working. Also, sanity is over-rated.

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Quote:

Simple things like iterative device programming are a doddle in AS4, just leave the programming dialogue open and click one button - my limited observation of AS5/6 is that it's far from so simple

Not true. It a one button press/click in AS6 also.

As of January 15, 2018, Site fix-up work has begun! Now do your part and report any bugs or deficiencies here

No guarantees, but if we don't report problems they won't get much of  a chance to be fixed! Details/discussions at link given just above.

 

"Some questions have no answers."[C Baird] "There comes a point where the spoon-feeding has to stop and the independent thinking has to start." [C Lawson] "There are always ways to disagree, without being disagreeable."[E Weddington] "Words represent concepts. Use the wrong words, communicate the wrong concept." [J Morin] "Persistence only goes so far if you set yourself up for failure." [Kartman]

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JohanEkdahl wrote:
Not true. It a one button press/click in AS6 also.

Hmm, I've found the 7-click sequence. Will have to make do with that. Still remain to be convinced that this is all worth it.

(grumpily mopes off towards the 21st century...) :(

Electronic components work on the principle of smoke; I know this because when I let the smoke out, they stop working. Also, sanity is over-rated.

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Quote:

Hmm, I've found the 7-click sequence

http://www.atmel.no/webdoc/atmel...

:: Morten

 

(yes, I work for Microchip, yes, I do this in my spare time, now stop sending PMs)

 

The postings on this site are my own and do not represent Microchip’s positions, strategies, or opinions.

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It costs virtually nothing to just try it.

I don't get the thing about the project files. Back in the day when PCs had 10MB hard drives it may have been an issue. These days you have TBs.

Just because AS6 has optional interfaces to SVN and Git doesn't mean you have to use them (though you perhaps have missed the utility of code control even for single developers).

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Yeah, thanks Morten I did find it eventually and reluctently I admit that it works nicely. I did get rid of a lot of toolbar clutter and that's helped. :)

Electronic components work on the principle of smoke; I know this because when I let the smoke out, they stop working. Also, sanity is over-rated.

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clawson wrote:
It costs virtually nothing to just try it.
Well it's cost me a working day to try it, but I have to admit that it is a more efficient environment so I'm sure I'll make that back quickly. Damn you guys for being right!

clawson wrote:
I don't get the thing about the project files.
Projects I'd seen a client convert to AS6 were substantially more complex than needed, but when I converted my AS4 startup project, it just had a couple of extra empty folders, which I can live with.

clawson wrote:
you perhaps have missed the utility of code control even for single developers.
No, I do my own code control long hand with dated snapshots and BeyondCompare. It's incredibly useful, and nice & flexible too.

Even though it takes an age to start, I think you guys have a convert to AS6. Meh! :evil:

Electronic components work on the principle of smoke; I know this because when I let the smoke out, they stop working. Also, sanity is over-rated.