more steppers at once, with acc. & decc.

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#1
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hello,

 

i'm busy to build a CNC machine. whit 4 stepper motors with each: 1 stepper driver.

machine is working now, but i programmed in a way that only 1 stepper motor/driver can run in the same time.

but now i need to do more motor/driver in the same time. and the have to acc. & decc.

 

atmega2560

language C

driver DM556 4 amp

edit: max. speed is 10 mtr./min = 1500 pulses/sec.

 

now i read some thing about this, and i think i understand this. 

mostly the use a interrupt, and in that interrupt the make the pulses, and check how much steps the stepper have made.

 

but what i don't understand is how to implement the acc & decc part. ?

 

can some one please explane how this go's. 

ore a code evample.

 

thanks in advance

 

 

 

 

 

Last Edited: Wed. May 13, 2020 - 01:48 PM
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Have a look at the GRBL project - it basically does what you describe. Unfortunately, the AVR struggles under the workload, so much of the development has shifted to the likes of STM32.

 

 speed is 6 mtr./min - that doesn't mean much - it depends on the gearing of the motor to whatever is being moved.

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yes i edit that in my start post:

1500 pulses/sec.

 

where can i find the GRBL project ?

Last Edited: Wed. May 13, 2020 - 09:14 AM
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Google GRBL

 

It is the first hit for me.

 

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i was searching in avrfreaks surprise

founded, tnx.

 

that is based on a arduino, i don't use that.

Last Edited: Wed. May 13, 2020 - 09:43 AM
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trixo wrote:

that is based on a arduino, i don't use that.

 

So what? It's still code written for an AVR. In fact, isn't the mega2560 used on the Arduino mega board?

#1 Hardware Problem? https://www.avrfreaks.net/forum/...

#2 Hardware Problem? Read AVR042.

#3 All grounds are not created equal

#4 Have you proved your chip is running at xxMHz?

#5 "If you think you need floating point to solve the problem then you don't understand the problem. If you really do need floating point then you have a problem you do not understand."

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 that is right, i gonna take a look, maybe i can see the methode.

Last Edited: Wed. May 13, 2020 - 10:45 AM