MK66FX1M0VMD18 diy board

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Hello,

 

I am asking this here to have an external point of view

 

I started using the teensy 3.6, but as soon as I asked them (their forum) how to make my own board, they said I had to buy a special chip, to program that arm cpu

but noone answered about why; I felt it was about martketing or something

 

does anyone knows about these ARM ships ?

why does it needs an extra chip to be programmed ?

 

regards

Last Edited: Tue. Oct 22, 2019 - 04:59 PM
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Thats a Motorola/Freescale chip.  YOU might get better answers from The Freescale forums than here.

 

phil1234567 wrote:
but noone answered about why

Did you point blank ask why? 

 

My guess is that the Micro on the Teensy has a special bootloader and/or other software running in it that may be copy/read protected.

 

JIm

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ok, I'll ask there

 

yeah but why a special bootloader, especialy for an open source board

 

and why does it need a special bootloader, why not a regular bootloader

they answered as if their ship was mandatory

whiuch makes no sens at all

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You need a jtag/swd programmer in order to load code into that chip. One method is to use the freescale dev boards that come with the required programmer hardware like the FRDM-KL25Z.
Then you can load the bootloader into the chip. There’s nothing to say you require the teensy bootloader - that is just a convenient means of getting code onto the chip.

I gather you’ve read this:
http://www.appfruits.com/2015/03/building-your-own-custom-teensy/

The teensy libraries are open source, but there’s nothing to state the hardware/software is.

Last Edited: Tue. Oct 22, 2019 - 09:15 PM
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As I understand it, the teensies use a zero-footprint bootloader. The special chip loads the bootloader into ram using swd or something nxp-proprietary, and runs it. So the downloaded code can use all of flash.

You should be able to run a more typical flash-resident bootloader if you make some relatively minor changes to the link commands...

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indeed apparently the MINI54TAN deals with programming the base core of teensy in the CPU to save memory space in it

 

https://medium.com/@mattmatic/pr...

Last Edited: Wed. Oct 23, 2019 - 01:53 PM
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Yeah, that's a good link.  But:

  1. It's a small NXP chip (MKL02) on the newer Teensies.  Not a Nuvoton MINI54 (which it looks like was used on the original Teensy 3.0 and 3.1  PJRC sells the "boot chips" for about $8 -sort of annoyingly expensive (compared to the main chip) for bulk manufacturing, but not awful for small projects.  https://www.pjrc.com/store/ic_mi... https://www.pjrc.com/store/ic_mk... OTTH, for bulk manufacturing you could load an application (other than a bootloader) directly into the CPU's flash and skip worrying about fancy boot procedures.
  2. The NXP chips have JTAG, SWD, AND a simplified (SPI-like) flash loading protocol they call "EzPort."  I'm not sure which one the teensies actually use for loading the main chip flash.