Minimal AVRISP mkII setup (no development system needed)

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I need to give my customer a way to program 8-bit AVR devices (specifically Mega88PA at the moment) with ready-compiled code which I can send them as a hex or binary file. They don't need to do any program development, so installing the full AVR studio would be overkill.

All they need is some way to install the USB driver for the AVRISP mkII and run the programming utility (STK500.EXE?) from command line, using parameters I will provide.

Is there somewhere I can find a stand-alone installation of the USB driver and the STK500.EXE program (or whatever I need for this) without installing the whole AVR studio?

I've seen AVRDUDE, but it looks like it would need a level of expertise which I can't really expect in my customer. It needs to be a simple procedure to install the USB driver, then plug in the AVRISP, then run the programming utility to finish the job.

This needs to run on Windows XP/7/8.

Last Edited: Wed. Feb 12, 2014 - 07:12 PM
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Quote:

I've seen AVRDUDE, but it looks like it would need a level of expertise which I can't really expect in my customer. It needs to be a simple procedure to install the USB driver, then plug in the AVRISP, then run the programming utility to finish the job.

Install libusb, run avrdude. If it's complicated with all the switches, make them a bat file.

Quote:

All they need is some way to install the USB driver for the AVRISP mkII and run the programming utility (STK500.EXE?) from command line, using parameters I will provide.

Install Jungo run stk500.exe. If it's complicated with all the switches, make them a bat file.

Personally, I would use avrdude until we get around to make atprogram (the cli interface in Atmel Studio) into a single package. (undefined timeframe as usual).

:: Morten

 

(yes, I work for Atmel, yes, I do this in my spare time, now stop sending PMs)

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meolsen wrote:
Install Jungo run stk500.exe. If it's complicated with all the switches, make them a bat file.

OK, I'm getting somewhere with this but I'm not there yet. First I installed AVRstudio 4.19 onto a desktop PC and it installed the Jungo driver. I was then able to plug in the AVRISP and use STK500 command line interface to talk to an AVR.

Then I copied the STK500 directory and the Jungo installer to a laptop. I ran the Jungo installer and plugged in the AVRISP, and it seemed to install the driver correctly.

I tried running STK500.EXE and got "The system cannot execute the specified program". I got around this by installing vcredist_x86.exe (I'm running XP SP3 here, which doesn't seem to have vcredist installed by default).

Then when I tried to run it I got:

Error: Could not create Stk500Common layer
Error: Could not create hex file reader
Error: Could not create source buffer
Error: Could not create destination buffer
Fatal: Make sure 'AvrCommon.dll' and 'Stk500Common.dll' are properly installed

Stk500Common.dll was already present in the STK500 directory, but AvrCommon.dll was in the AvrStudio4\dll directory on the desktop PC. I copied AvrCommon.dll into the STK500 directory but I still got the same error messages.

I tried copying all files from AvrStudio4\dll into the STK500 directory, but I still get the same errors.

Does STK500 need any other DLLs, or does it expect them to be in some specific locations on the disk?

Edit: I just tried installing the complete AVR Studio separately on the laptop. Now STK500 seems to work, both in its own directory within AVR Studio, and in the earlier stand-alone directory. I suspect the installation sets some registry parameters that STK500 needs, so maybe I will have to tell my customer to install the whole AVR Studio after all, even though they will not be using 99% or it.

I'll look into AVRDUDE, but I suspect they will baulk at the need to install the complete libusb suite.

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Isn't The complete libusb suit smaller than jungo? I also believe, with a bit of searching, that you should be able to find out how to carve atprogram from armed studio 6,which would be much more updated with respect to tools and devices over stk500.

For avrdude+libusb on windows, I think there is more up to date information on their project site.

I have no know of stk500.exe, never used it or looked at how it is organised.

:: Morten

 

(yes, I work for Atmel, yes, I do this in my spare time, now stop sending PMs)

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meolsen wrote:
Isn't The complete libusb suit smaller than jungo? I also believe, with a bit of searching, that you should be able to find out how to carve atprogram from armed studio 6,which would be much more updated with respect to tools and devices over stk500.

For avrdude+libusb on windows, I think there is more up to date information on their project site.

I have no know of stk500.exe, never used it or looked at how it is organised.


OK, thanks for the advice. At least I know I can get something working for them. Maybe I can get something simpler working with AVRDUDE and libusb; I'll try it when I have more time.

I noticed one possible gotcha where it said that libusb and Jungo are not compatible on the same machine, so if they tried to use libusb and either had AVR Studio already installed, or installed it later, they might have problems.

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If you want to stays with Studio 4 command line tools, you might want to consider getting them from: http://www.atmel.no/beta_ware/

(If you want to use Studio 6 tools - here was my attempt at standalone atprogram: https://www.avrfreaks.net/index.p... )

Eugene

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ezharkov wrote:
If you want to stays with Studio 4 command line tools, you might want to consider getting them from: http://www.atmel.no/beta_ware/

Thanks, that looks like what I need. I'll try it when I get some time.

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Also, seems that support has a entry on how to carve atprogram from Atmel Studio: http://support.atmel.com/bin/cus...

:: Morten

 

(yes, I work for Atmel, yes, I do this in my spare time, now stop sending PMs)

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Just use a Kanda Keyfob programmer.

I've just had exactly the same problem and decided to go for a stand-alone approach. Now I simply email my customer a configuration file (if it's changed) and a hex file.

#1 This forum helps those that help themselves

#2 All grounds are not created equal

#3 How have you proved that your chip is running at xxMHz?

#4 "If you think you need floating point to solve the problem then you don't understand the problem. If you really do need floating point then you have a problem you do not understand." - Heater's ex-boss

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Brian Fairchild wrote:
Just use a Kanda Keyfob programmer.

I've just had exactly the same problem and decided to go for a stand-alone approach. Now I simply email my customer a configuration file (if it's changed) and a hex file.


That's worth looking into. I've also found an even cheaper one from Amazon (by Sunkee), so I've ordered that to try.