Mini ASM tool set

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I'm trying to do an evaluation of the 8-bit AVR. Is there an easy way to install an assembler only?

I'm (still) trying to install Studio 6, and I was shocked by its footprint (a lot of which is MS of course.)

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AS4 (4.19 in fact) gets you the Atmel Assembler 2 for about 100MB rather than 750MB.

Or you could use avr-as, the GNU assembler for AVR in the GNU binutils. To get that on Windows possibly the easiest way is to install WinAVR20100110 which costs about 50MB download ISTR. You can also get a copy with:

http://www.atmel.com/tools/atmel...

Which is Atmel's "modern" version of WinAVR. But that's 98MB.

There are third party assemblers such as "avra" that may be worth looking out too.

For the most support (both users here and Atmel app notes) stick to using Atmel Assembler 2.

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Many thanks!

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You could try GAVRASM.

Latest version is 3.3 (18-05-2012)

http://www.avr-asm-tutorial.net/...

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Excellent! I installed AVR Studio 4 and worked through the "Novice's Guide to AVR Development". That was exactly what I needed to de-mystify the environment and get something going.

I had started looking at "the other guys", but I was so overwhelmed by the number of potential devices and the extent of the IDE that I became rather depressed. The fact that I ran out of disk space when I tried to load it didn't help much either.

Thanks again for all the suggestions.

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Oh dear! Some ATtiny44a chips and an AVRISP mk2 showed up in the mail today. I suppose it's time to see if I can still code after a 30 year pause :)

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Restart00 wrote:
...after a 30 year pause :)
Would that be delayMs(2.592)?

Ross McKenzie ValuSoft Melbourne Australia

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It's pretty amazing to think that I can buy these chips for about $1. Forty years ago I was messing around with an 8080 that cost more than my annual salary. We could only afford to buy one device!

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One of the other things that has changed in that time is the size of code development tools. Whats the big deal about 500Meg, these days?

I remember an 8051 assembler that fit on a floppy disk.. Remember those? Today, you could not get much of a text file on a floppy, if you could find a floppy drive to use.

Jim

Jim Wagner Oregon Research Electronics, Consulting Div. Tangent, OR, USA http://www.orelectronics.net

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Quote:

Today, you could not get much of a text file on a floppy

Tell me more about that. Has ASCII text actually inflated over the years then? ;-)

I just took the text from a copy of Pride & Prejudice as a .txt file:

E:\>dir pride.txt
 Volume in drive E is VBOX_windows
 Volume Serial Number is 0000-0801

 Directory of E:\

15/02/2013  10:19           691,775 pride.txt

So you could fit 2 or 3 such books on a 1.44MB floppy.

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@Cliff

I only had 360K SS/SD floppys on my first 6800/6809 Flex system back in 81'.
Well i had 2 (£300 a pcs) , one for the os & one for data or compiler.

Compiling a C program with Introl-C required you to swap floppy several times when invoking CPP/CC/Linker

But then in 86' i got a PC-XT Clone with a Seagate ST-225 (25Mb) - And thought it would never be filled up ....

How things have changed

Edit: On topic ...
I have snipped the avrasm2 dir from a windows "Studio install" , and uses it with wine under linux , works fine.

/Bingo

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When Amstrad first made PCs we had three models PC1512SD, PC1512DD and PC1512HD. The first had one 360K floppy, the next had two and the third had a whopping 10MB hard drive! I can remember being lumbered with an "SD" one at first and longing for the day when I could get a second floppy so I could have DOS+Masm on one disk and the code I was working with on the other. In the end I went wild and plugged in a "hard card" which was a full length ISA expansion card holding a disk controller and a 10MB hard drive mechanism. After being limited to a 360KB world I thought that something with 30 times the capacity was more than I could ever hope for.

My mobile phone now has a 32GB microSD in it. Three thousand two hundred times the capacity of the HD and about 96,000 times the capacity of a 360KB SS/SD floppy.

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Here we go!
My first computer had 1 byte of memory, and ran at 1Hz.
After 5 minutes I got bored with it, as I'd run all the possible programs.

Seriously, I always blamed my sparse commenting style on the fact that, way back when, the assembler ran way faster if it didn't have to keep loading more chunks in from the floppy.

Four legs good, two legs bad, three legs stable.

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Wimps!

My first computer were nowt but cardboard box in't middle of road.

(Actually it had 1K of 16 bit memory and an ASR33, and I had to build the thing myself.)

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ka7ehk wrote:
I remember an 8051 assembler that fit on a floppy disk.. Remember those?

Oh, those were the days.
I had a fully featured editor/assembler/linker for 6502/6510 on a Commodore 64 (64kb ram), and still had plenty of space for actually writing an assembler program in it :lol:

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Quote:
Has ASCII text actually inflated over the years then?

Not exactly. But my corporate-styled artist-animated powerpoint presentation is surely much larger than the "print this in a large font on overhead film" .txt file, even though the actual information content has not changed much! (and that wasn't bad enough; now people (eg design contests) would rather have a video of you reading that same content while showing a picture of your device. Sigh.)

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I had a Timex Sinclair1000 with the 16k memory expansion module. Programs stored on an ordinary audio cassette tape. 60% chance the program would be corrupt with plain old audio tapes, the 'metal' ones worked better, but not much.

Ahh the good old days.

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