Maximum G forces

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Does ATMEL (or any manufacturer) provide parameters on mechanical stress endurace of components?

If so, pointers would be appreciated.

Anyone have experience with high mechanical stress applications?

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I dare say for automotive and military/aerospace parts they would. I'd suggest you contact Atmel.

My thought is that the problem would be more due to the interface between chip and pcb. The chip and bond wires have little mass and they're molded in epoxy.

A possible issue is that unless you purchase the higher rated components, Atmel or any other manufacturer aren't going to warrant the component. If I use a commercial part in an automotive application and have problems - too bad. 

Goggle as always have some answers:

http://lpvo.fe.uni-lj.si/fileadm...

Last Edited: Fri. Jan 22, 2016 - 02:34 AM
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Hi Kartman,

The silicon issues I am familiar with.  Back in the 90s I was on a project and worked with Toshiba on flowing the epoxy over the wires (not part of the process then) and those parts eventually could regularly take 100Gs and under special cicrumstances even 1,000Gs.  And yes the PCB issues require more attention too...

 

Thanks

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An anecdotal mention found with a Google search:

http://www.kirj.ee/public/procee...

 

The testing was for the whole satellite module, which had a mounted AVR:

In vibration tests, the system managed to endure

sinusoidal sweep loads of 22.5 g at 30–200 Hz and 10 g

at 200–2000 Hz in every axis (15 min) without any

damage. Also random vibration tests with loads up to

18 g at 20–2000 Hz (4 min) were conducted. In shock

tests the satellite was subjected to mechanical shock of

1410 g. The tests showed that EPS is mechanically

stable and able to survive the launch onboard the Vega

rocket.

I thought that the "automotive" AVRs conform to a specification that includes vibration/shock, but I can't seem to find any numbers.

You can put lipstick on a pig, but it is still a pig.

I've never met a pig I didn't like, as long as you have some salt and pepper.

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Perhaps use die parts, and then fill the hole thing with silicone (or something similar), that way the mass problem will be a min.