Lowest cost stand alone avr programmer

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Can some one point me to the lowest cost stand alone ISP programmer for AVRs? I am looking for something for field updates of a ATMega128 5V VCC. It could be loaded via USB or serial or para.

Al Welch

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Well if you don't mind wiring up your own 74HC244 see:

http://www.lancos.com/prog.html

(oops, sorry, missed your USB/serial requirement - if you don't have a parallel port available then it's going to be slightly more complicated than that)

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I don't know if it would be the "lowest cost" (probably not) but we have had good luck with the "keyfob"-type from North Pole Engineering on Mega64 and other AVR models. Our customer's field service people are happy with them.

http://www.northpoleengineering....

Lee

You can put lipstick on a pig, but it is still a pig.

I've never met a pig I didn't like, as long as you have some salt and pepper.

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Kanda (www.kanda.com) has a number of keyfob-type and handheld standalone ISP programmers available for the AVR.

Note that the keyfob programmers only come in 32-kB and 64-kB denominations; you cannot fill an entire ATmega128.

The handheld programmers come in 32-kB and 128-kB denominations. With the 128-kB version, you could fill an entire ATmega128.

The Kanda programmers are still a little behind the times: the interface from your PC to the programmer (so that you can pre-load the programmer before going out on the field) is a parallel port interface. I see that the keyfobs in Lee's link use serial ports, so they may have wider PC support.

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Twin AVR in tool tree section work.
With & wihout the power buffer (74HC244) boath ckts in help file (english).
But if you ness up the fuse settings only Parralel (one the uses parallel programing tequinq PS:nothing to do with parallel port) would revive.

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Quote:

I see that the keyfobs in Lee's link use serial ports, so they may have wider PC support.

We were pretty happy with the NPE product, due to "full featured" flash+EEPROM+fuses and target or keyfob power.

Lee

You can put lipstick on a pig, but it is still a pig.

I've never met a pig I didn't like, as long as you have some salt and pepper.

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Thanks to all those who took the time to reply. I will check out all suggestions. I will need one that is fairly simple for field people to use the software with. I like the CodeVisionAVR Chip Blaster software as it is intuitive and works well. Of course that needs an AVRISP to do the job AND a license for each computer so that would not be suitable

Al

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So what am I missing? What is wrong with the AVRISP and AVRStudio? It is only $29 and the software is free.

Smiley

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From the tone of the OP's original question, I had the impression that the query was for a "little black box" that could be used on the field without the benefit of any nearby computer.

Now that the Chip Blaster software has come into play, I just don't know what to think anymore.

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I've started with Ponyprog and the serial to AVR interface consisting of a transistor and three resistors. This works just fine, but can be slow for larger projects. I've added a AVRISP, it's fater and allows programming directly from studio. It costs $30. You get what you pay for :-).

Markus

Markus

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I'm using onyProg and the serial adapter for programming an hand made AVR ISP. After all total costs will be <10€

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Why do people claim pony Prog is free.
If you want a device for commercial use there is a little matter of build time and boxing as well as leads and connectors.

Keep it simple it will not bite as hard

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PonyProg software is free. It's released under the GPL license. Everybody has total liberty to use the software for any purposes they see fit, and they don't have to pay a dime to make use of the software. That's true by definition.

Now, the software is pretty useless unless you have the hardware interface to hook it up to your AVRs. That hardware interface is going to cost you money, whether you purchase a pre-built solution such as the generic Kanda STK200-type dongle, or build a custom programmer from scratch.

But, you'd have to spend money on programming hardware no matter what software you elected to use on your PC... The programming software and the programming hardware are two separate products.

PonyProg is free because you don't have to spend any extra to get your hands on an unlimited version of the software. Contrast that with CodeVision's ChipBlasterAVR software.

You can use the same STK200 programming dongle with either CodeBlaster or PonyProg (or avrdude or uisp or...). But, you have to pay for two distinct products to use it with ChipBlaster... once to get your hands on the hardware, and once to get access to an unlimited version of the software. You don't have to pay for the software if you use PonyProg. Because PonyProg is free.