A list of viable Xmegas

Go To Last Post
4 posts / 0 new
Author
Message
#1
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

Hi guys,

I'm preparing to include 16 and 32bit parts into my curriculum vitae and I'm more inclined to wait for the SAM D21 parts as I keep hearing about Xmega silicon problems... But until SAM D21 will be available, is here a list of viable Xmegas available?

Thanks!
Vasi

_____
Edit: I've read the sticky and saw the diagrams. From those, which one is problem free?

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

The Xmega's were announced quite a while before they actually became available. Sometimes there might be valid marketing reasons to do so, but one of the down sides is that many of the customers expect the delayed rollout is to fix silicon bugs, and that the devices will be perfect when they finally do hit the market.

Unfortunately, that wasn't the case. There were a fair number of "errata" initially, many involving the ADC sub-system. The Xmegas have now been through a number of revisions, and the errata lists keep getting shorter and shorter. One might view the version II Xmegas as those incorporating the USB module. Clearly those have seen significant improvements to their substrate.

Most recently the Xmega E series was released. It is to the Xmega A series what the Tinies are to the Megas. It, also , has been through several revision numbers.

The real reason to add chips to your CV is not just to have a long list of chips that you have used, but to better learn what chips / capabilities / options are available, so that down the road you will be in a better position to select the optimal hardware to meet a projects requirements, and hopefully already be familiar with its idiosyncrasies, thereby allowing you to be efficient and proficient in its utilization.

With that in mind know that the Xmegas have made it through their roll out phase, and several silicon revisions, to certainly make them viable contenders for one's projects. You might wish to do a project or two where you learn to use the event system, the crypto hardware, the internal programmable logic, the DMA subsystem, etc., (The sub-systems that you might not find on numerous other chips).

JC

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

Define "viable".

Anyway your question is an odd one. You said " to include 16 and 32bit parts". Exactly what does the 8bit Xmega have to do with 16 or 32 bit anyway? The SAMD series are, of course, 32 bit micros though I guess one might argue that the thumb mode instruction set kind of makes them a bit 16 bit.

Atmel's other 32 bit line is the AVR32-UC3 but in a market dominated by ARM they are very niche.

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

Well, we use A3U and E5 parts in commercial products with long lifetimes, so I'd say they are "viable".