IoT networks

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Hey freaks...

 

Guys what you are hearing about Sigfox or Weightless?

The idea is to create a low-power and low-cost network for IoT, it's really nice...

 

http://www.sigfox.com/

http://www.weightless.org/

Regards,

Bruno Muswieck

Last Edited: Fri. Oct 16, 2015 - 12:26 AM
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Not really. The network already exists, it is called GSM (CDMA, LTE, WiFi, whatever is available in your area). And those networks are fast, reliable and maintained by trained professionals.

 

The price for M2M contracts in GSM networks is very very cheap. And I'd rather pay for established infrastructure than to some startup with unknown future.

 

The only advantage may be low power, but that depends on how much you need to send.

NOTE: I no longer actively read this forum. Please ask your question on www.eevblog.com/forum if you want my answer.

Last Edited: Fri. May 15, 2015 - 07:35 PM
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The contract is cheap but the hardware isn't Alex. That's the main advantage that I see in these new networks.

Regards,

Bruno Muswieck

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Ok, you've go the point. The problem with most of those systems is that you depend on the infrastructure. In case of SigFox, you are out of luck if you are not in Germany or France.

 

Here is another one, which I rather like - http://helium.com . There are a lot of former Atmel people in engineering there.

 

I personally don't feel like all this ready for relatively small customers, since it is hard to get up and running without extra help, which I'm not sure you will get if you are not buying a lot.

 

 

NOTE: I no longer actively read this forum. Please ask your question on www.eevblog.com/forum if you want my answer.

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Arqiva are rolling-out Sigfox in the UK: http://www.arqiva.com/overviews/...

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Helium, LoRa, Sigfox USA :

Sub-GHz IoT options face off

Jessica Lipsky

May 14, 2015

http://www.embedded.com/electronics-news/4439454/Sub-GHz-IoT-options-face-off

Samsung may have a Sigfox board :

Power consumption rates for the Artik modules will largely be determined by the connectivity method. Source: Samsung

(above via http://www.eetimes.com/document.asp?page_number=1&doc_id=1326586&image_number=2)

"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

Last Edited: Sat. May 16, 2015 - 04:52 AM
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Targeting a wide variety of applications ranging from environmental sensors to asset tracking, the SIGFOX and TI collaboration maximizes the benefits of narrowband radio technology. It also reduces barriers to entry for manufacturers interested in connecting their products to the cloud. Using the SIGFOX infrastructure reduces the cost and effort to get sensor data to the cloud and TI’s Sub-1 GHz technology provides years of battery life for less maintenance and up to 100 km range.

http://circuitcellar.com/cc-blog...

They claim 100 km range, impressive and really interesting. For sure, this 100 km will be in lower frequencies, but it still impressive.

Regards,

Bruno Muswieck

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I don't know about that. I did some math and basically you can get a 100 km range in 433 MHz band with -100 dBm receiver sensitivity and +10 dBm TX power. All this under ideal conditions and with ideal hardware design. Not likely to happen in a real life. And to achieve -100 dBm receiver sensitivity you will need to drop your data rate to some barely usable value, like 300 bps.

NOTE: I no longer actively read this forum. Please ask your question on www.eevblog.com/forum if you want my answer.

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And I don't know about Brazil, but situation with sub-GHz channels allocation in Europe is terrible. Basically they have one channel in 433 MHz band and one channel in 866 MHz band. So all those cheap toys, garage door openers and other simple wireless systems are already using those bands, so in metropolitan areas those channels are congested.

NOTE: I no longer actively read this forum. Please ask your question on www.eevblog.com/forum if you want my answer.

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alexru wrote:

I don't know about that. I did some math and basically you can get a 100 km range in 433 MHz band with -100 dBm receiver sensitivity and +10 dBm TX power. All this under ideal conditions and with ideal hardware design. Not likely to happen in a real life. And to achieve -100 dBm receiver sensitivity you will need to drop your data rate to some barely usable value, like 300 bps.

Good math Alex... I don't get right about the 433 MHz here in Brazil, the regulations isn't so clear to me. But for 900 MHz is ISM over here too.

Regards,

Bruno Muswieck

Last Edited: Sat. May 16, 2015 - 09:06 PM
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Sigfox, what a hoot. Unlicensed ISM band, sub-GHz. It'd take an impractically huge number of self-funded mesh network node members to support semi-ubiquitous coverage.

 

433MHz where legal has tight restrictions on transmitter duty cycle - to avoid interference to TX only wireless thermometers, etc.

 

868MHz is sparse and legal in some EU countris.

902-928MHz is mostly US/CA. Has restrictions on occupied bandwidth vs. transmitter duty cycle. Freq. hopping needed for realistic data rates. Quite busy with SCADA systems - remote monitoring/control of utility meters, Mains power distribution telemetry, etc.

 

All are absurdly bad choices for a WAN.

 

 

 

Last Edited: Sun. May 17, 2015 - 03:50 AM
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Things are getting crowded in all bands. It looks like UWB is a way to go. Get a lot of spreading gain, transmit at low powers, where no one cares and pick any band you like. Still to risky for a simple "try and see if it works".

NOTE: I no longer actively read this forum. Please ask your question on www.eevblog.com/forum if you want my answer.

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er, we have this wee little issue called curvature of the earth. Radio horizon is not very far away unless you have high-site  antennas.

And 433MHz has severe regulatory restrictions on transmitter duty cycle.

 

realistic, for practical channel widths and data rates ... -90's at best, with no FEC.

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alexru wrote:
In case of SigFox, you are out of luck if you are not in Germany or France.

Forbes

San Francisco Now Has Its Own Cellular Network Just For The 'Internet Of Things'

by Aaron Tilley (Forbes Staff)

Oct 27, 2015 @ 08:00 AM

http://www.forbes.com/sites/aarontilley/2015/10/27/samsung-backed-sigfox-has-built-a-wireless-network-for-the-internet-of-things-in-san-francisco-plans-coverage-of-10-us-cities-by-early-2016/

...

Now Sigfox is pushing hard into the US.

At an event on Tuesday, the company is announcing it has complete coverage of San Francisco, and is planning coverage for a total of 10 US cities by the first quarter of 2016:

San Francisco, New York, Boston, Los Angeles, Chicago, Austin, Houston, Atlanta, Dallas and San Jose.

...

The network runs on the unlicensed wireless spectrum band of 900 megahertz in the US, so the company doesn’t need to acquire licensed spectrum.

...

 It took only 12 months to get its network to cover all of Spain, Nicholls said. (Thomas Nicholls, Sigfox executive vice president of communication)

...

Once the company achieves scale in a region, the idea is to provide a subscription for access to the Sigfox network for around $1 a year per device.

...

SIGFOX

SIGFOX Partners with San Francisco to Connect the City to SIGFOX Internet of Things Global Network

San Francisco, CA

Oct. 27, 2015

http://sigfox.com/en/#!/press-release/sigfox-partners-with-san-francisco-to-connect-the-city-to-sigfox-internet-of-things-global-network-10

...

In November, SIGFOX and the City of San Francisco will jointly sponsor a hackathon, in order to allow developers and makers to use the technology and generate new ideas for how SIGFOX’s network can be used to create innovative smart-city solutions.

...

Found via

https://e2e.ti.com/blogs_/b/connecting_wirelessly/archive/2015/10/28/sigfox-expands-into-san-francisco-using-ti-sub-1-ghz-technology#gp

 

"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

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Zigbee is pretty low in power consumption and is a robust self organizing mesh network for IoT applications.  You can get data back to a server running software like Indusoft SCADA software so you can access it through a web browser on your cell phone.

 

Zigbee:  http://www.icpdas-usa.com/zigbeewirelessdataacquisitionWebinar.php?r=maria
Indusoft:  http://www.icpdas-usa.com/scada_software.html?r=maria

 

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IoT Business News

MultiTech and WaterBit Announce Partnership to Demonstrate the Power of the Internet of Things Within the Agricultural Community

February 04, 2016

http://iotbusinessnews.com/2016/02/04/80302-multitech-and-waterbit-announce-partnership-to-demonstrate-the-power-of-the-internet-of-things-within-the-agricultural-community/

MultiTech’s IoT Gateway Utilizing LoRa® Wireless Technology Communicates Valuable Data in WaterBit’s California Site Where Cellular Service is Not an Option.

...

Key to the field trial is the ability to test LoRa and confirm its performance characteristic in challenging crop conditions in multiple locations in California during the winter.

The dense foliage of citrus trees, rain, and variations in terrain will challenge test radios.

Multitech and WaterBit look forward to sharing early test results in February at AG World Expo in Tulare, California.

"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller