The Internet of Things (Getting into it)

Go To Last Post
8 posts / 0 new
Author
Message
#1
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

I need to learn about wireless connectivity and the like so I have read quite a bit and its all a blur

 

I didnt want to hijack the thermostat thread anymore so here I am

 

I am going from (read hung up on) Toms comment

 

Getting your data across the internet can actually be fairly easy.  If you are used to logging data using a serial connection or an equivalent such as using xbee radios, all you need to do is first: run a "serial proxy" program on most any sort of computer at the remote end.  This is simply a bridge between the computers serial port and ethernet port, which would be connected to the internet.  You would connect the serial port to whatever data acquisition hardware you have.  The serial proxy listens to the ethernet port waiting for messages addressed to the proxy's assigned "port number".  At the "host" PC end, you can, for instance, use a "telnet" program.  You "telnet" to the IP address and port number of the remote system, now your PC's keyboard and display are essentially connected directly to your data acquisition hardware.  Now this is great if the keyboard and display arrangement is all you need

And this sounds exactly where I need to start, I have breakout boards and all kinds but I want to start at the very start

 

I have an ATMega sending some data to an XBee and I have another XBee receiving that data and it works just fine, I can use Brays terminal and connect to COM3 and its there, data comig in

 

Now I don't want to sound like that Prathiba dude but I need guidance here! as I don't have a clue

 

I have been looking at port forwarding and I learnt something about dynamic IP's so I signed up to NO IP DNS service (unsure if I even needed to) I have downloaded some stuff like Putty but right noew I simply don't have a clue so i would relly appreciate any guidance

 

How do I bridge my USB COM3 to the ethernet port? thats the first step google just leaves me baffled and I need to setup a serial proxy and it all sounds so simple

 

Sorry for the weak thread I have really tried but its no good I need to talk

 

 

Last Edited: Fri. Oct 16, 2015 - 12:38 AM
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

What a coincidence, just seconds before I read this I wrote the following post about IoT:

 

https://www.avrfreaks.net/comment...

 

But it seems to me that IoT devices are "Things" that have the "Internet" (ie wi-fi or ethernet) within them. Not something relying on the crutch of a host PC to act as a bridge. So I'm not entirely convinced that what you are talking about is IoT anyway.

 

Having said all that I have a couple of Wiznet WIZ200WEB boards - they are "fun" and I can see how you might easily use them to add a "small gadget" to your network - like a temperature sensor that reports results via HTTP or  maybe an alarm clock that gets its time checks over NTP or something?

 

So what's the big picture of what you are trying to achieve here - what does the gadget "do" and how exatly do you want it to connect to the internet? Do you really want to have to leave a PC turned on to act as its bridge?

 

Say for example you made a TCP/IP connected temperature monitor and you were in a hotel in Paris and wanted to know how hot it was in your house. Would you want to have left device+router or device+PC+router turned on back in your house?

 

Looking at it another way - Xbee is just a data channel. You probably "talk" to it pretty much like you would a UART but it then communicates with an AVR some distance away over the airwaves. Now, how about removing the Xbee and replacing it with wi-fi. All that really changes is that you can now "hear" and "talk" to the device while sat in a hotel in Paris.

Last Edited: Mon. Jan 19, 2015 - 04:01 PM
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

Cliff I hate these buzz words, like the milenium bug its usually designed to make someone money

 

But as an engineer who is interested in the developments all this wireless connectivity is fascinating but most imporytantly I have a real use for it

 

I have a use for it personally for the fun factor but the ability to control/monitor remote equipment would allow me to do some very good things in my job as I have processes and tests running all the time and they take months sometimes

 

So I'm not entirely convinced that what you are talking about is IoT anyway.

I agree but I think I need to start at the beginning, I have CC3000 breakout boards and I just ordered some Wiznet device which I will get tomorrow but I am not ready for IoT stuff yet I just want to go as basic as possible as if its 25 years ago and build on that, its how I operate

 

The embedded IoT stuff interests me as an engineer as our products at work would really benefit from it telemetry is almost redundant!

 

So what's the big picture of what you are trying to achieve here

The big picture is remote log and control machines, Toms project is like utopia and I will get there probably with a Pi or old desktop, leaving on equipment is not an issue here as equipment will be running anyway

 

After I crack this I will move onto wiznet card or maybe ESP8266 maybe fit it to some product we make and monitor it whereever it may be going in the world, if I did all that I would have learnt a lot and it would be so much fun

 

Right now I am no where near I mean I don't even know how I get USB COM3 port forwarded, its like so confusing

 

Xbee is just a data channel. You probably "talk" to it pretty much like you would a UART but it then communicates with an AVR some distance away over the airwaves

XBee transmitter connected to an AVR which sends serial data (the temp and RH) all the way from my desk in the dining room to the PC desk in my living room!, the data is received on the com port so in my mind I am putting data into the PC, its routing it accross the net tjhat I don't have a clue with

 

I see things like Putty and it leaves me confused as to what I need to kjeep it minimum

 

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

Bignoob wrote:
I agree but I think I need to start at the beginning, I have CC3000 breakout boards and ...
Might consider a verfied/validated/certified wifi module; Atmel has one.

Atmel Corporation

Gallery

Home > Products > WINC1500

https://gallery.atmel.com/Products/Details/17cdbcd4-e410-4587-8129-e85d1c92627c

This extension provides state-of-the-art Internet Of Things (IOT) applications examples and documentation to use with the new Wi-Fi WINC1500 Xplained Pro extension board.

Bignoob wrote:
The embedded IoT stuff interests me as an engineer as our products at work would really benefit from it telemetry is almost redundant!
Telemetry is one of the uses of MQ Telemetry Transport (MQTT).

One of MQTT's creators, Andy Stanford-Clark, used it for his house; the broker application (makes machines visible to the Internet) can run on a Raspberry Pi or likely the router.

There's MQTT and MQTT-SN for Arduino.

MQTT is one of many ways for IoT and Machine-to-Machine (M2M).

Cellular modules have been used for M2M for quite sometime.

MQTT logo

Andy’s Twittering House

http://mqtt.org/projects/andy_house

"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

IoT is the main space I work in.

There are infinite ways to get from here to there all perfectly valid.

A common way is to use an ISM band radio, 802.15.4 / zigbee / XBee or Bluetooth or whatever to connect your small devices to a common gateway.

The gateway then has a wired Wi-Fi or cell connection to the internet so you can push data into the cloud to be displayed on a website or a phone.

 

The end devices are typically sleepy devices while the gateway is always powered. Using zigbee / XBees as a wireless serial port is fine for hobbyist but horridly insecure and unscalable. Packetizing and encrypting the data stream is more complex but more deterministic. But I digress.

 

The basic process is the end device wakes up, sends data through it's radio to the gateway.

The gateway receives said data reading the serial port with C/C++/python and builds a data image to upload.

The gateway code then opens an encrypted tcp/ip socket or a UDP or a PPP connection , wired, Wi-Fi or cellular, to the server and sends the data.

The server then stores the data in a database or flat files and displays it when the web page is requested.

Simple

 

So there is software at all three layers, End device, Gateway and web server.

Of course this is a full featured implementation, you can always simplify and reduce as necessary even to as simple as sending an SMS to a smart phone app

Keith Vasilakes

Firmware engineer

Minnesota

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

IoT is the main space I work in.

Really?, looking at your profile picture I would of said you were a baddie from batman or suchlike =)

 

There are infinite ways to get from here to there all perfectly valid.

There does seem to be a  hell of a lot, I need to start as basic as possible and build from that

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

Bignoob wrote:

IoT is the main space I work in.

Really?, looking at your profile picture I would of said you were a baddie from batman or suchlike =)

 

There are infinite ways to get from here to there all perfectly valid.

There does seem to be a  hell of a lot, I need to start as basic as possible and build from that

 

Thanks :D

My linked in profile says I'm Rex VonVasilakes....

 

The easiest is probably to connect to an always on PC or PI with an open TCP socket to the server of choice.

Cell modems are a bitch

Keith Vasilakes

Firmware engineer

Minnesota

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

keith v wrote:
The easiest is probably to connect to an always on PC or PI with an open TCP socket to the server of choice.
If willing to use HTTP, one way to implement a server is by ownCloud; other such are also available.

ownCloud.org

Features

http://owncloud.org/features/

...

Easy development of 3rd party apps with the share REST API. Quick access to core functions for app development with the powerful ownCloud App API and webhooks following the publication / subscription model.

keith v wrote:
Cell modems are a bitch
The 2 watt transmitter has some punch.

"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller