IAR Rant re: EWAVR 3.20A Download

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I just been given access to IAR's download site. But to unzip the (101Mb!) installation file I have downloaded for EWAVR 3.20A, I MUST use an unzipper that employs 'hard encryption'. They recommend WinZIP 9 (which I don't have a copy of), or they point to an alternative PKWARE product.

My employer, quite correctly, employs a fairly strict policy of using software within its license terms. And you would have thought that IAR would be sensitive to such issues. However, the license terms of the free PKWARE product they suggest expressly forbids the commercial use of the product in this way (2.1.1 (ii) of the PKWARE license clauses).

Which means that, in order to get a copy of EWAVR 3.20A that I have paid for through my 'Support and Upgrade Agreement', I have to buy another piece of unzipping software.

Perhaps it's only me, but this really p****s me off. IAR, who are going to obsessive lengths to protect their software, are suggesting violation of someone else's software license terms, or requiring the use of a specific unzip utility that I have to pay for. :evil: And let's not forget; all this protection is for their benefit, not mine.

Anyone else find this unacceptable?

Comment from IAR would be nice (especially with regard to the suggested violation of another software author's license terms).

Regards,

Colin

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I agree with you.

If anyone (hackers) want to crack IAR softwares, they can do it.IAR should stop this method of software protection :twisted: because it does not any effect on work of hacker,IAR only waste time and the money :x of the customers.

IAR must be LARGE !!!!! in MIND :lol: :lol:

They must accept crack of their software(several percent of any software use crack) and this is normal,not harmful for IAR.
:wink:

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You could always use the free GCC compiler. For the Windows environment see the WinAVR distribution.

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EW wrote:
You could always use the free GCC compiler.

True, I could do that. But I need as much speed optimisation as I can get, and my understanding is that the GCC compiler doesn't optimise as effectively as the commercial products, and also using it would condemn me to using AVRStudio for all my debugging, which is a fate worse than death.

No, my gripe wasn't with the product, per se, just the OTT protection.

Regards,

Colin

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Colin, is there anything in the Winzip 9 evaluation licence that would prevent you from using it to unpack the IAR archive within the 21-day evaluation period?

Eric, he could ditch a compiler and support agreement he's already paid good money for, and spend valuable development time installing and getting to grips with a new development environment, then modifying the existing IAR-style source code so that it compiles with GCC. But, quite frankly, why should he? Or, more to the point, why should IAR be allowed to treat its customers in such a way that going through all the hassle of learning a completely new toolset and ditching thousands of dollars of existing tool investment is seen as a preferable solution to simply expecting IAR to do things right in the first place?

As an IAR user, I know where Colin is coming from here - we had a SUA back in the EWA90 1.x days, and the only time IAR contacted us was with a reminder that the SUA was about to expire, and would we like to renew it? Getting updates out of them meant having to phone the UK office and ask if there was anything to be had - we did get one update out of them this way, but if it had been left up to IAR then we'd still be using the same version we were supplied with originally, and with nothing to show for the SUA fees. We never did bother renewing that SUA...

From an engineering point of view, I love working with IAR tools. I just dread ever having to deal with their customer support.

Regards,
Chris

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chriscoulson wrote:
Colin, is there anything in the Winzip 9 evaluation licence that would prevent you from using it to unpack the IAR archive within the 21-day evaluation period?

Probably not, although I'd rather not have the hassle of installing and then removing a piece of software.

I sent an e-mail to UK support with much the same content as my original posting, and they have sent me a CD with the unzipped software on it. They suggested that I would have received the software notification eventually, but that it takes about a month to let everyone know! (I contacted them only two weeks after the software had been released). You would have thought that, since they must have the e-mail address of pretty much everyone on an SUA (they certainly have mine), they could send an automated e-mail on the day of release.

As you point out, Chris, the IAR tools seem pretty good, but the support can be atrocious.

Regards,

Colin

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to cstocks:

Quote:
just been given access to IAR's download site. But to unzip the (101Mb!) installation file

I saw in IAR site that demo is 57MB,where can I find the 101MB download link.

Please send the link for me.(by pm)

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yaaavar wrote:
I saw in IAR site that demo is 57MB,where can I find the 101MB download link.

Please send the link for me.(by pm)

If you want to use IAR's tools BUY them. If you think that it's way too expensive, use something else. The demo is only 57M because it is a demo.

cstocks or his employer paid for the compiler and as a customer of IAR, they were allowed to download the new, non-demo version. I would imagine IAR pays attention to who is downloading the full version of the software, so if cstocks gave you a link to the file, he would put both his employer and his own job at risk.

What is odd is that you talk trash about Embedded Workbench in this thread yet you inquire about how to steal it.

Why don't you try using tools that you can afford? Have you even TRIED to use WINAVR? Have you even TRIED the demo versions of ImageCraft or CodeVision before deciding that you must use IAR's Embedded Workbench?

/* John Butera */

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John is right:

pepsi wrote:
If you want to use IAR's tools BUY them.

I'm certainly not going to help you steal them.

And the IAR tools aren't that expensive. Here in the UK, a single seat is about £1k at the moment, and for that you get a sophisticated, optimising compiler. I wonder how much the thieves out there consider their own time to be worth, while they are busy trying to steal someone else's efforts.

Why do you imagine that a registered, fee paying user of the software would help you to get a copy for free? It's not in my interest to pay IAR to maintain the product so that you can use it for nothing and get the benefit of my subscription.

If you want to use the compiler for commercial purposes, you'd be a fool to use stolen software. If it's for hobby use, go have a play with WinAVR.

Regards,

Colin

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Dear Pepsi:

I do not want to stole IAR ,I only want to know the diff in sizes,in site is 57MB,and in above topic is 101MB.

At know I found that 101 is for customers only.

Please be more polite, and do not use words like as "stole".

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Why can't I use words like "stole"? Does using that word make "borrowing" software feel somehow wrong? That's interesting.

I'm done.

/* John Butera */

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Colin,

Would it be possible to download the 101 MB software and unzip it using whatever is required at a different location, burn the expanded software to CD, and take that back to work to continue the installation?

I know this opens up other worm cans - such as taking the software off site and possibly exposing the installation to wild viruses, possible other copyright violations,etc.

However, since the software is not installed at work when you do this, and since it is never actually installed during the unzipping process, it might be a workaround.

I know this is also a hassle to do too - like Chris' suggestion. Might be easier to convince your company to get a single license for Winzip and go with it. Or consider your alternatives with other compilers. Voting with the pocketbook has a way of getting a manufacturer's attention.

But if you are emphatic to use IAR only, your choices are limited and all we can do are offer the obvious solutions.

And yaaavar - you have to understand that if all you are interested in is the actual file size (don't know why), all you have to do is ask what is the file size or why is there a difference - not for the link to go download the package. Asking for the link to go get the commercial package is very suspicious.

Also, you should know that most all commercial entities that deliver software that way give out one-time links. Their server understands that the link belongs to a specific customer and connects them up with whatever software they bought. After the download is completed, the link is unusable. Anyone who gave you the link to commercial software is pretty much giving away their copy to you and most people won't want to do that.

Please note - this post may not present all information available on a subject.

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refields wrote:
Or consider your alternatives with other compilers. Voting with the pocketbook has a way of getting a manufacturer's attention.

Well, I could try another compiler, but we have several seats of IAR here (for several micros), and when all's said and done, I've paid for the SUA (though I could choose not to renew it when it comes up again). Like I mentioned, the IAR tools are good, it's just niggles like this that get my goat.

Anyway, they did eventually send me an unzipped copy on disk after I had a rant at them, too!

Of course, if IAR are so very concerned about security, their best bet would be to post update CDs (maybe 50p per customer; an SUA costs hundreds of pounds) to customers with SUAs. Then nobody could ask for links to steal the software from, because there would't be any.

Regards,

Colin