How sick or dead is my PSU?

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After disconnecting the PSU mentioned in another thread,

I eventually noticed that its fan did not turn on and declared it dead.

Was that a correct decision?

It's an ENlight.

It seems to be producing correct voltages,

but presumably that would change if the fan never came on.

I suppose I could test by inserting an unused PSU,

but I'd really prefer to know first.

Reconnecting a PSU is a real pain.

I've got two ribbon cables to work around.

 

I suppose the question comes down to are ENlight PSU fans supposed to be on at start up?

"Demons after money.
Whatever happened to the still beating heart of a virgin?
No one has any standards anymore." -- Giles

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Depending on model ...

Some PSUs have fans that are temperature (or power) controlled and do not come on until needed.

David (aka frog_jr)

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frog_jr wrote:
Depending on model ...

Some PSUs have fans that are temperature (or power) controlled and do not come on until needed.

Ack.

I should have said:

Model: GPS-300AB-100 V

P/N: 83014C1B1

I've been trying to find a manual, but to no avail.

Unless I can find more information, I suppose I'll have to replace the PSU and discover whether that does the trick.

I hate wrestling octopuses.

The prospective replacement's fan does come on immediately.

'Tain't an ENlight.

"Demons after money.
Whatever happened to the still beating heart of a virgin?
No one has any standards anymore." -- Giles

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skeeve wrote:
mentioned in another thread,

So why not give a link to that thread so we know what you're talking about??

 

I presume we're talking about a PC PSU here?

that its fan did not turn on and declared it dead.

Was that a correct decision?

As noted, the fan might be designed to come on only when needed.

 

But, it it's supposed to be always on, it is quite likely that things will have overheated - which means that things will probably have been damaged.

 

It seems to be producing correct voltages,

but presumably that would change if the fan never came on.

Get something like this - so that you can test it under load:

pc-power-supply-testerlcd-atx-pc-power-supply-tester

http://www.maplin.co.uk/p/pc-pow...

 

http://www.maplin.co.uk/p/lcd-at...

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If you are going to replace the PSU then you need to pull it from the case.

 

If you are going to do any sort of real troubleshooting on the PSU then you will have to remove it from the case.

 

So,.... Remove it from the case.

 

First thing to do trace the fan's power cable and see if it ties directly to +12V, (or whatever), or if it connects to circuitry that looks like it might turn the fan on / off, or regulate its RPM.

If it is tied to V+ and doesn't run, then either the fan, or the rest of the PSU is bad.

 

Do you remember, from when the fan was working, if the fan ran at multiple speeds?

 

JC

 

Edit: Don't, by the way, power it up without a load.

PC PSU's are designed to have a pretty hefty load on the outputs when they are powered up.

 

Last Edited: Sat. Mar 11, 2017 - 04:45 PM