How to pronounce "sensorless" -lis or -les

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How to pronounce "sensorless" -lis] or -les]

Sorry for offtopic.

Thanks !

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it sounds how it is spelt... it ends with "less"

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a3v2r wrote:
How to pronounce "sensorless" -lis] or -les]!
-luhs] (just to be ornery)

Stu

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In dictionary I've found words:
flavourless, flawless, tireless, senseless, fearless,
meaningless - all are transcriptioned as [...lis]

There is no word "sensorless" in any dictionary.

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The E is shortened in duration so the actual sound is probably more like "LUSS" but spoken quickly.

C: i = "told you so";

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Quote:
How to pronounce "sensorless"

There is no such word, so how you pronounce it is inconsequential. However, if there was such a word, how you would pronounce it depends on where you are from.

Regards,
Steve A.

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a3v2r wrote:
In dictionary I've found words:
flavourless, flawless, tireless, senseless, fearless,
meaningless - all are transcriptioned as [...lis]
Pronunciation guides vary as illustrated by the difference in on this page: http://www.webster.com/cgi-bin/d...

Short e vowels in many cases are pronounced like short i's. Many people pronounce pen the same as pin, though I don't consider it correct to do so.

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Where I come from we'd stretch the -less out to a full four syllables lee-ah-uh-ess sort of slurred and ending like that sticky bit of caramel that hangs between your teeth and a just bitten GooGoo Cluster that slowly slumps and never seems to break but just fades to infinite thinness as it swings down from your mouth and gums up your beard. We'd pronounce the -ness on thinness the same way. If you're in a hurry to talk about something, just don't come down here.

Smiley

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For those unfamiliar with American regionalism, as Smiley so eloquently and picturesquely points out, there are marked differences in pronunciation (and style) across the US. Television has produced a bland, universal "English" sometimes referred to as coming from Nebraska (right in the middle of the country), but as you travel around you find areas that drop r's, add r's, and do other amazing feats of linguistic gymnastics on the language. Not to be confused with Canadian, British, or Australian English, all also different while mostly similar.

Chuck Baird

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Quote:

... just don't ...

Shouldn't that be more nearly "jest" or "jist"? ;)

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Quote:
Shouldn't that be more nearly "jest" or "jist"?

He also abbreviated it - I think it's more like "jist don y'uns be commin down heeya, heeya?

Chuck Baird

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Does this mean that if you don't come to your senses, you'se are 'senseorless'? :wink:

Jim

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Thanks to all !

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Quote:

Canadian, British, or Australian English, all also different while mostly similar.

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Over here its pronounced "liss".
The OP must have applied 220V to his temperature sensor and now he is sensorless.

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theusch wrote:
Quote:

... just don't ...

Shouldn't that be more nearly "jest" or "jist"? ;)

The words are spelled the same, even if spoken by Jed Clampett. 'Just' is spelled just, even if it is pronounced with four or five syllabus. Anyway, the OP misspelled sensorless, I think he was referring to senseless, describing the nature of this topic.

Smiley

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A guy at work said he could tell which COUNTY you were from in South Carolina if he heard you talk. Very subtle differences in southern regional dialects. Careful listeners can tell Mississippi, Georgia, Tennessee speakers by their accents.

Imagecraft compiler user

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Quote:
You wouldn't hear the difference between prince Charles and an Australian miner?

The miner would be the one I could understand. And the one with a professional future.

Chuck Baird

"I wish I were dumber so I could be more certain about my opinions. It looks fun." -- Scott Adams

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Brushless DC motors come in versions with sensors, and sensorless.

Imagecraft compiler user

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zbaird wrote:
For those unfamiliar with American regionalism, as Smiley so eloquently and picturesquely points out, there are marked differences in pronunciation (and style) across the US. Television has produced a bland, universal "English" sometimes referred to as coming from Nebraska (right in the middle of the country), but as you travel around you find areas that drop r's, add r's, and do other amazing feats of linguistic gymnastics on the language. Not to be confused with Canadian, British, or Australian English, all also different while mostly similar.

I have a mid-atlantic accent, and I thought that most of the TV accents are the same. I think I can hear a Nebraska accent. Not strong, and only apparent in certain words.

I pronounce "sensorless" somewhere in between "liss" and "less", closer to the "liss", unless I am stressing the "less" part of the word.

To a degree it also depends on the next word in the sentence. I will probably elide "sensorless" a little bit with the next word, so if the next word starts with the mouth in a position more like the "i" is "liss" then I will probably pronounce it more like "liss" than "less". The converse would also be true.

-Tony