How effective are wireless (CDE) anti static wrist straps

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I've seen a number of wireless anti static straps on the market (eg http://www.cablesunlimited.com/products/Prod_Individual3.aspx?groupcode=I3382) and was wondering how effective they were and what to look out for when buying one.

Has anyone here tried one ? What did you think ?

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In these dry winterdays (humiditywise), I use a strap that connects to safetyground (via a resistor). This corona-based strap: I think it's bla bla. It will not let the charge you built up flow away into thin air. Unless I mis something ....

Nard

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There is a chance to get rid of static elektricity be producing ions. A corona discharge is one way, but has the potential to produce at least a little charge by itself. So its defeniteliy nothing if you work on Laserdiodes, unprotected FETs or other very sensitive parts.
What makes me suspiceous is that they don't mention the use of batteries or a power switsch. I would not like the option without batteries : a small radioactive source.

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I own and use one of those and they are sold by a reputable electronic component distributor here.

at first i was really really skeptic about how this thing could dissipate static charge without harming any sensitive devices i touch and work with everyday,
i use it every day, and have so for a year, i have not statically fried anything so far.

I might just be really lucky though as I still do use antistatic work mats, floor tiles, clothing etc.

i sometimes forget this cordless antistatic wrist strap on my arm and get made fun of by my girlfriend(i just tell her that her shoes are ugly >:) ) but i noticed that through the year and since wearing this magical wrist strap almost 24/7 that i dont get shocks off my car when i climb out in winter anymore.

maybe it really works? i actually still dont know.
sorry i couldnt be a provider of conclusions, just my experience with it.

Louis.

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The corona thingy might help; The resistive strap will equalize the potential between you and the desk, whatever potential the desk happens to be at, in a reliable way.
If you were to spot me during the day I wouldn't be wearing a strap. You _would_ see me removing snap-crackle-pop clothing before getting close to anything sensitive, but no wrist strap.
I'm cheating. The floor's conductive, and the shoes I wear for everything (why change something comfortable, I have duck feet. Special edition Jacoform 350's) are dissipative.

My opinion is that people who are aware of the problem don't have the problem. In my personal experience this leads to incompatibility with some people: I'm holding out a component, and the try to take it. I instinctively (I learned this at age 5, it IS hard wired by now) turn my hand to block, forcing them to make skin contact first, which they instinctively don't want to. They can't grasp what that extended pinky is for.

/Kasper

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I checked the link, and I'm quite skeptical. What is clean room approved? They don't list an agency, and clean rooms aren't the issue.

I also don't like the non explanation. Radioactive materials will dissipate static electricity -- before I retired, I worked for a company that made them for a while -- but they don't say anything about radioactivity in the item spec.(Nor would I use a radioactive prodict)

Corona dischrge apparently amounts to ionizing a fluid -- exactly how this would take place I'm not sure, and they certainly don't elaborate.

I'm also skeptical of the Lifetime Guarantee -- every serious guarantee that I've ever seen is very specific.

Finally, I agree that if you're aware of the problem, you can usually avoid the problem. One of my favorite techniques :wink: was presented in the build instructions for my Sinclair ZX-81. This was a microcomputer kit made available in the same year as the first IBM-PC (1981).

Anyway, the typically British instructions said
(quote is close to correct)
"...avoid static electricity. You may want to consider removing shoes and socks while assembling the unit (seriously)."

The "(seriously)" just cracked me up.