How do Tesla Chargers Work?

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OK Pawi, explanation is clear describing how we can get 1A with < 4.2V. I guess I was thinking about car batteries where you can really hit them in the bulk stage, then finish off at 14.4 and 13.2V. While everyone is thinking about multi mode chargers, how do those tesla chargers work? Whats the V and A? Do you need a credit card to use them? How much does it cost? (I assume its more than $.15 per KWhr?) I've only seen one Tesla, never ridden in one, and I saw a charger in front of some lawyers office. Seems like negative advertising if you're looking for some bargain legal advice.

 

 

 

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Jim

Imagecraft compiler user

Last Edited: Tue. Jan 3, 2017 - 02:10 AM
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bobgardner wrote:

While everyone is thinking about multi mode chargers, how do those tesla chargers work? Whats the V and A?

 

Honestly, I have no clue at what voltages and currents Teslas operate. I only know that Renault uses about 400V packs, probably 100 cells in series. It is certain however that they all use the CC/CV method as it's the only sensible one there is.

As for Renault, it's also evident from the fact that it takes very little time to go to 80% charge compared to the last 20%. Some charging stations also display the current current (this isn't correct English, is it?!). On these chargers, this CC/CV thing can be observed quite clearly.

The Renaults can use up to 400V at 16A tri-phase AC.

For the the people from areas with different mains power: This kind of power is standard in most of central Europe. 230V AC from line to neutral, 400V from line to line, three lines at 120° phase shift. The normal outlets have three wires: line, neutral and ground, and they deliver nominally 230V at 10A. Tri-phase is used almost exclusively for appliances like dishwashers, washing machines and ovens. Therefore the five pin outlet(3 lines, neutral , gnd) is only found in kitchens, laundry rooms and sometimes garages.

 

Edit: formatting

"Some people die at 25 and aren't buried until 75." -Benjamin Franklin

 

What is life's greatest illusion?"  "Innocence, my brother." -Skyrim

 

Last Edited: Mon. Jan 2, 2017 - 08:39 PM
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pawi777 wrote:
... but why bother?
Alternate instruments and methods.

The Linear Technology solution has less volume with much less noise than the portable switcher I operated twenty years ago.

The PowerStream solution is less expensive, has battery charging information with it, and PowerStream is a source of battery information and chargers.

 

"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

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bobgardner wrote:
... how do those tesla chargers work? Whats the V and A?
Up to 120kW

bobgardner wrote:
Do you need a credit card to use them? How much does it cost? (I assume its more than $.15 per KWhr?)
Zero price; an assumption is the cost is a part of sales and leases.

Locally, have seen EV chargers at a Cracker Barrel and new hotels (a few parking spots)

For Texas, the Tesla Motors Supercharger network appears to be more for urban, semi-urban, and along interstates.

There are Tesla Motors operators in rural Texas; likely modified their garages and barns to add a common EV charger (guests may have a Chevrolet Volt, Nissan Leaf, etc)


https://www.tesla.com/supercharger

https://www.tesla.com/support/supercharging

https://www.crackerbarrel.com/

 

"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

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I used the tesla supercharger info to make this ss. Looks like a half hour on a supercharger is worth $12 or so. You cant charge it for an hr because it aint got that many kwhrs. So 170 mi at 30 mpg in a gasser should use 5.6 gal at $2.40/gal or $13.60, so I claim the tesla 'gets about 30 mpg'.

 

file teslacharger.xls              
Jan 2 17 Bob G   0.15 $/kwhr        
      miles per 1hr charge units? v a A per phase 1hr cost
single 10 kw 28 2.8 120 83.3    $       1.50
dual 20 kw 52 2.6 240 83.3    $       3.00
super 170 kw 340 130.8 480 354.2 118.1  $    25.50

 

I reworked the ss. Units is KWhr/mi, and the last row is same as the middle row, 2.8. Recip is Mi/KWhr. Amps per phase is same 83.3, 1 hr cost on the supercharger is $12, so that should double the equivalent mpg. I'm at work, but I'll edit the msg with the new ss when I get home.

 

Imagecraft compiler user

Last Edited: Tue. Jan 3, 2017 - 03:16 PM
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The local EV chargers :

  • EVgo, 50kW, 2 parking spots for one dual charger, RFID, one hour limit
  • BMW dealership, BMW i3, one charger though probably more

 

"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

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The university where I hang out has 21 chargers scattered around campus. These are the plug-in type. Some are from "Blink" and some are from "ChargePoint". There is a "membership fee" to use the Blink chargers (don't know how it is metered). 

 

The university, itself, has many electric vehicles. Some are like big ATVs while others are full vans, for the campus mail and maintenance folks, for example. The vehicle noise level on campus is much lower than it was just a few years ago. The campus is moderately large in area, with a core that is close to 1 square mile. 

 

Jim

 

Until Black Lives Matter, we do not have "All Lives Matter"!

 

 

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bobgardner wrote:
I've only seen one Tesla

I guess I see  about one a week these days on my commute (so it could be the same ones over & over).

 

That's in addition to other EVs/Hybrids.

 

EV chargers are quite common around here these days

 

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Most DC chargers will operate between 200V and 500V. The current will be regulated by the charger although the vehicle will give its maximums and its requests. I expect Tesla chargers work the same as SAE/IEC/CHAdeMO/GBT and whatever else is out there. The charger will generally charge at the fastest rate the vehicle supports. This will be up to the amount of KWH the user has paid for.

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Some stores were simply too far ahead of their time

When in the dark remember-the future looks brighter than ever.   I look forward to being able to predict the future!

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5+ YO thread?

John Samperi

Ampertronics Pty. Ltd.

https://www.ampertronics.com.au

* Electronic Design * Custom Products * Contract Assembly

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What happened to the guy?

“Everyone knows that debugging is twice as hard as writing a program in the first place. So if you're as clever as you can be when you write it, how will you ever debug it?” - Brian W. Kernighan
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Heisen wrote:
What happened to the guy?
Continually broke the "be nice" rules.

Ross McKenzie, Melbourne Australia

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We have zillions of Teslas driving around in San Francisco.  They are very popular.  They seem, in general, to be above the traffic laws requiring cars to stop at stop signs, as are the bicycle riders.  I sense a tone of self righteousness amongst them all.  My comment about electric cars is: many of the electrons come from coal fired plants in distant places, so the zero emissions claim is a myth.  Although, I must admit the efficiency of the generating plant is probably greater than that of an internal combustion engine, and electric motors are 90+% efficient.

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MarkThomas wrote:
... to stop at stop signs, as are the bicycle riders.
The ones in one STATE OF TEXAS jurisdiction are keen; a bicycle club's ride leader states during the pre-ride instructions to briefly stop with one foot down (a track stand doesn't cut it)

MarkThomas wrote:
... and electric motors are 90+% efficient.
Indeed though, here, one can get into a dustup on certain generators (wind); am uncertain on the status of the local photovoltaic plant.

 


High Torque Fully Modular Smart Motors & Generators | Linear Lab

 

"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

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gchapman wrote:

The ones in one STATE OF TEXAS jurisdiction are keen

There is a large group of bicycle riders in San Francisco that used to all come out at a prearranged time and proceed to snarl traffic in the whole city.  All the cars were stuck in place, blocked by other cars ahead and behind, and traffic everywhere came to a standstill.  They haven't done it for a good number of years.  I guess they figured they made their point, whatever it was.  Probably: don't mess with bicycle riders, or else.  Now most have become arrogant enough to ignore the rules of the road that inconvenience them in some way.  California law says bicycles are to obey the same rules as automobiles.

 

gchapman wrote:

Indeed though, here, one can get into a dustup on certain generators (wind); am uncertain on the status of the local photovoltaic plant.

I always thought wind turbines killed way more than their share of birds, but the Audubon website says not.  I thought I read that the turbine blades trick bats.  And lots of people don't want to have to listen to them.  I think photovoltaic roofing materials is a win-win if reasonably priced and keep out the rain.  If all the houses were roofed that way, the coal plants would only have to run at night, when nobody can see the smoke coming out the smokestacks.  Although it is true that silicon fabs are dirty to the outside.

 

Fusion is the obvious solution, although it is a difficult engineering problem.  Government subsidies to oil companies are more than 700 times as large as grants to labs and universities doing fusion research and engineering.  So we know which way that breeze blows.

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MarkThomas wrote:
the coal plants would only have to run at night, 
Likewise battery discharge.

MarkThomas wrote:
Fusion is the obvious solution, although it is a difficult engineering problem.
I hear, listen, and try to comprehend heretics in engineering, physics, medicine, ...

MarkThomas wrote:
Government subsidies to oil companies are more than 700 times as large as grants to labs and universities doing fusion research and engineering. 
That which is unsustainable will not be sustained.

MarkThomas wrote:
So we know which way that breeze blows.
fyi, one effect of climate change is the reduction in the number of high intensity tornadoes.

Atmosphere | Free Full-Text | Trend Analysis of U. S. Tornado Activity Frequency

via

Can Earth Handle a Superflare? Ionosphere, Tornados, and more | S0 News Mar.27.2022 - YouTube (4m16s)

 

"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

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gchapman wrote:

I hear, listen, and try to comprehend heretics in engineering, physics, medicine, ...

My ex boss said he worked on plasmas for 3 years and fusion will never happen.  As soon as you solve one problem a new one pops up.

 

gchapman wrote:

fyi, one effect of climate change is the reduction in the number of high intensity tornadoes.

But aren't hurricanes increasing in number and intensity?

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MarkThomas wrote:
But aren't hurricanes increasing in number and intensity?
IDK

 

"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

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MarkThomas wrote:
But aren't hurricanes increasing in number and intensity?

Only if you listen to NPR regularly!

 

FF = PI > S.E.T

 

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I never listen to NPR.  I used to listen to Terry Gross interview famous people on her show Fresh Air, which was on NPR and started at 7:00PM.  I began the 40 mile commute home from KLA-Tencor at 7PM, to miss the worst of rush hour traffic on Hiway 101.

 

I do know from direct observation that in San Francisco it has been raining less for quite some number of years than it did 10 and more years ago.  It used to rain reliably in November and February, and had for a long time.  Now it doesn't.  The 90+ foot tall redwood tree in our back yard prays for rain every day.  San Francisco was famous for being cold and foggy in the summer, and had been like that for a century or more.  Now it's rare to have a foggy summer day.  To see such change in a lifetime is remarkable.

 

The weather models are so far behind on the adjustable parameters that predictions for more than a day ahead are almost always wrong.  It has become like the old joke in Los Angeles: the best weather prediction being tomorrow will be just like today.

 

Now I'm depressed.

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in San Francisco it has been raining less for quite some number of years than it did 10 and more years ago. 

PLEASE take some of our rain, it hasn't stopped raining for 6 month here, my fence palings are sprouting.

John Samperi

Ampertronics Pty. Ltd.

https://www.ampertronics.com.au

* Electronic Design * Custom Products * Contract Assembly

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If only.

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It snowed on me yesterday...

 

Neil