High voltage switch?

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#1
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Hi,

 

I have a pet project that requires the switching of ~10kv on/off. I would prefer to find some already assembled product that accepts a trigger + 10kv and outputs 10kv when triggered with a signal from my signal generator. Alternatively, if such a device does not exist or is to expensive then I would like to know what kind of FET/triacs/etc... you guys would recommend.

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Rise time? Power? If you cant wait for a HV power supply to turn on,  a thyratron can do the job

http://www.ebay.com/itm/2-5Amp-1...

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Current is around 10mA, rise time/fall time no idea, I want to switch upto 100 mhz. 10kv power supply will be on all the time.

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And if you need to switch a lot of current at 10KV, then you could also consider a vacuum relay.

It is exactly what is sounds like, a relay within a glass envelope, with a vacuum.

With no oxygen in the surrounding atmosphere you burn / bit the electrodes less.

 

BTW, BangGood Electronics has several small HV power supply modules, (presumably low current output, I don't recall the "spec's").

On those, if it met your other requirements, I think you could just switch the primary side on and off, either with a small high-side-driver PFet/NFet pair, or perhaps just an NFet in the ground lead.

 

JC

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I want to switch upto 100 mhz

 Is this correct? 100 mHz is "kind of fast" 8)

Tom Pappano
Tulsa, Oklahoma

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The problem with semiconductor devices is that they are leaky. And they are usually only good for 1200V, so you'd need a chain of them along with circuitry to drive them. I gather you mean 100MHz rather than 100 milli Hertz.
As the Doc says, it would be easier on the low voltage side of the transformer. This is making a rather nasty RF transmitter.

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ok I think i can make do with 10 Mhz switching.

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Even 10MHz is fast for 10KV. Radio transmitters don't even use voltages like that (any more).

 

What is the load on the output side of this switch?

 

Jim

 

Until Black Lives Matter, we do not have "All Lives Matter"!

 

 

Last Edited: Sat. Oct 1, 2016 - 01:39 AM
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I would use RF vacuum relay, it needs to have a proper rating at the desired frequency or else it will fail, if you dont need much current handling relay shouldnt be to expensive

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for lower frequencies what is the best bang for buck high voltage switcher? 

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I have a pet project that requires the switching of ~10kv on/off.

Are you trying to kill the pet?

John Samperi

Ampertronics Pty. Ltd.

www.ampertronics.com.au

* Electronic Design * Custom Products * Contract Assembly

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I am trying to replicate an experiment I read in a book. I do not want to say the experiment because it might make me look like a retard, but I just wanted to see for myself what is true is what is not.

 

The top priority is that i do not want to die from electrocution, 2nd is cost. I suppose proper execution of the experiment should be on the priority list, but it is just to satisfy curiosity.

Last Edited: Sat. Oct 1, 2016 - 05:26 AM
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Hi,

 

so do you want to actually switch it at 10MHz? so that the output is an almost rectangular signal? Or do you want to modulate it,  so that the output is a sine wave? Like 10kV 10MHz AC?

Because switching at this frequency is almost impossible without spending a sh**load of money . And you're likely to get sued for disturbing pretty much any form of radio transmission within many miles of your location.

 

Modulating the signal however could be done with a a high power radio transmitter vacuum tube. It's still not easy though.

 

Cheers,

Patrick

"Some people die at 25 and aren't buried until 75." -Benjamin Franklin

 

What is life's greatest illusion?"  "Innocence, my brother." -Skyrim

 

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Unless you are going to conduct your experiment inside a Faraday cage you are going to have the authorities around very quickly.

 

 

#1 Hardware Problem? https://www.avrfreaks.net/forum/...

#2 Hardware Problem? Read AVR042.

#3 All grounds are not created equal

#4 Have you proved your chip is running at xxMHz?

#5 "If you think you need floating point to solve the problem then you don't understand the problem. If you really do need floating point then you have a problem you do not understand."

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Tesla didn't have those problems in his day!

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@toalan,

 

It would help to know what you want to do.  Do you want to:

 

  • take a 10kV DC and switch that 10 million times a second
  • switch a 10kV 10MHz signal on and off at a rate 1Hz or less

 

​very different things and difficult to know what you want to replicate.  Are you reading 'a modern Prometheus'?  

 

David

 

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Sell the 10kV supply, buy a 0-20V, 20A DC supply. Then get a few ignition IGBTs, and 1:100 ignition coils, and HV diodes to sum on bus. Build a multi-phase arbitrary step up DC-DC power converter, with closed loop feedback. An AVR could be used for proof of concept, might need something faster, once specs are less nebulous.

It all starts with a mental vision.

Last Edited: Sun. Oct 2, 2016 - 12:20 PM