gps co-ordinates to useful data

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Is there anyway of making useful information from gps co-ordinates data into information?

Say finding which town/area?

 

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useful information

???  You have to define that!

 

You can plug the data into Google Earth and see where the coordinates are.

 

You could make your own database of X number of locations, and then see which is the closest, and how far you are from it.

 

You need to state more clearly what you would like to do!

 

JC

 

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Google and others have mapping services. You create a request with the co-ordinates and it responds with a map or whatever.

 

https://developers.google.com/ma...

 

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DocJC wrote:

useful information

???  You have to define that!

 

You can plug the data into Google Earth and see where the coordinates are.

 

You could make your own database of X number of locations, and then see which is the closest, and how far you are from it.

 

You need to state more clearly what you would like to do!

 

JC

 

 

Say you have the data, the co-ordinates, and you want the information from these co-ordinates, i.e. Town/County ect?

Is there a database you could download to the mcu.

 

 

EDDITED: Note that Memory is not a problem.

 

Last Edited: Wed. Mar 4, 2020 - 02:06 AM
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There must be  something.

 

Some Garmin GPS have the ability to ask for  a place name, and provide the direction and distance to that place from your current location. I think that list of names plus coordinates is called a "Gazatteer". 

 

In the U.S., the basic table has been provided by the USGS (U.S. Geological Survey) and has been enhanced by various quasi-public and private bodies. In the pre-GPS days, I can remember going to the university library, getting the book from the reference shelf in the map section, looking up names, then pouring through paper maps to find how to get there.

 

Be aware, however, that the U.S. Gazateer is huge. There is one for each state. They list every named stream, hamlet, cross-road, bay, hill, and valley, not just towns and cities.

 

Jim

 

Until Black Lives Matter, we do not have "All Lives Matter"!

 

 

Last Edited: Wed. Mar 4, 2020 - 03:12 AM
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 Note that Memory is not a problem.

 

How can you say this when the database could be terabytes! Memory is obviously a problem for things like tom-toms as you have to load a local database. The average tom-tom is running embedded linux and has a fair slab of ram and a emmc/sdcard for storage.

 

If you want to resolve something like a local timezone, then that database is considerably smaller. 

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The process is called reverse geocoding by people in the industry. There are various online services, as well as offline software, that'll do this for you, but almost all of them require $$$$. If you do a web search for "free reverse geocoding", you'll find a few free online services that have limitations on usage.

 

If you're looking for the underlying data, the US census produces a dataset called "TIGER" that can be used as the basis for reverse geocoding. US only, of course. Looks like about 7GB in the distribution.

 

- S

 

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Thanks lads.  Looks interesting...

This looks interesting. https://address-parser.net/features.php#parser

Last Edited: Wed. Mar 4, 2020 - 04:48 AM
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ka7ehk wrote:
In the pre-GPS days, I can remember going to the university library, getting the book from the reference shelf in the map section, looking up names,
That jogged my memory.

 

When 17 I had asked a girl out and arranged to collect her from her house. But then realised that I only knew her name was Mandy. What would I call either of her parents if they answered the door? Off to the Malvern public library and the reference book section and looked up the street which then listed all the houses and their owners by name. Williams. Saved!

 

Privacy Laws have stopped all of that now.

Ross McKenzie ValuSoft Melbourne Australia

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Fianawarrior wrote:
Is there a database you could download to the mcu.
??? what mcu ARM ?

 

it huge data... use simple way.With modified .kml to receice your coordinate-gps then browse the google map with big cache memory.

 

JSB

 

 

 

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Using the geolocation API, Google can guesstimate your location (with a confidence level) by sending it data about visible wifi APs (and cell towers if you have that capability)

The geocoding API translates a partial address or lat/long coords into a full address

The timezone API will tell you the timezone and DST offsets based on lat/long coords

 

(1) you obviously need network connectivity and the services are HTTPS only

(2) you need to be able to parse the JSON response

(3) you need a developer account key which requires a credit card number, but the free usage limits are reasonable for dev work

(4) it's google, which some people may object to

 

The APIs work well from ESP8266 and ESP32. I use this for self-configuring clock projects.

Last Edited: Wed. Mar 4, 2020 - 08:43 PM