A good IC for audio amplification

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Hey Im looking to amplify my PWM audio output, can anyone suggest a good IC for amplification, maximum INPUT( not supply) voltage is 5volt. Preferably something that uses few external components and is easy to use.I am going to use an 8ohm speaker with about 0.5-1W rating.

[moved from AVR to GE]

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TDA7052.

Leon

Leon Heller G1HSM

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ive come across that a lot, it doesn't distort with 5V right ,absolute maximum ratings say about 8V input. if someone has used it in one of their projects,was the sound clean?

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I've used it for years. The sound quality is quite good.

Leon

Leon Heller G1HSM

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I stuck an LM386 on rev1 XMega proto board. That chip sounds horrible (very noisy). I have the rev2 board layed out with an ST part # TS4871. Anyone here have experience with it? I'll check out the TDA7052 also.

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telliott wrote:
I stuck an LM386 on rev1 XMega proto board. That chip sounds horrible (very noisy).
Improper separation / filtering of analog and digital power supply.

Stealing Proteus doesn't make you an engineer.

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ArnoldB wrote:
telliott wrote:
I stuck an LM386 on rev1 XMega proto board. That chip sounds horrible (very noisy).
Improper separation / filtering of analog and digital power supply.

Yep. I didn't take as much care as I should have on the layout for the audio amp, but that part seems to be *very* senstive. Even though I have a very clean supply (separate from digital) and bypassed the amp well, it is still noisy. I didn't stick a ferrite on there for the first round, but have it on there now. Good ground plane, and power straight back to the regulator. Have you used the LM386 with good results?

I think I'm just going to use an audio amp intended for cell phone application anyway even if it is a little more in terms of cost.

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No audio IC will sound good if you mess up the wiring :? I have used 2 LM386 for stereo amps in some applications without any problems.

Also used TDA1905 and TDA7240, the whole trick is to have the gut feel about ground, power and signals (in and out) routing or it will sound horrible regarless of which chips is used.

John Samperi

Ampertronics Pty. Ltd.

https://www.ampertronics.com.au

* Electronic Design * Custom Products * Contract Assembly

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telliott wrote:
Have you used the LM386 with good results?
Yes, and I don't remember that it was extra sensitive.

But I am also not the most audiophile guy in the world. I even have used TL431's for audio amplification (great fun, as it is a shunt regulator / adjustable zener, not an audio amplifier). While the sound was OK for me, people complained about distortion, and indeed the o'scope revealed them. But I could only hear them at higher volumes.

Stealing Proteus doesn't make you an engineer.

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The LM386 is a very old chip, and has lots of deficiencies when compared with newer devices.

Leon

Leon Heller G1HSM

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leon_heller wrote:
The LM386 is a very old chip, and has lots of deficiencies when compared with newer devices.
Sure Leon, and what Microchip product would you recommend instead?

The LM386 is old and still in business after decades. That means it is and was "good enough" for gazillions of engineers. There is no reason why it suddenly shouldn't be good enough any more.

Stealing Proteus doesn't make you an engineer.

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I guess the only question is how does the cost of TDA7052 compare to LM386?

(seems to be pretty much even stevens at Digikey)

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ArnoldB wrote:
telliott wrote:
Have you used the LM386 with good results?
Yes, and I don't remember that it was extra sensitive.

As I already mentioned, I may have been able to improve the layout a little, that is probably not the issue. Most likely, it is just a difference of opinion on what is acceptable for noise. I think the LM386 is probably just a noisy power amp in general and is not a good choice for new designs. Doing some google searches reveals that it is probably about as noisy as audio power amps get.

I'll try to update with results of using the TS4871 in 2-3 weeks or so. The TDA7052 Leon mentioned looks good. Cheap and very simple. I like the standby option on the TS4871 though...

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ArnoldB wrote:
leon_heller wrote:
The LM386 is a very old chip, and has lots of deficiencies when compared with newer devices.
Sure Leon, and what Microchip product would you recommend instead?

The LM386 is old and still in business after decades. That means it is and was "good enough" for gazillions of engineers. There is no reason why it suddenly shouldn't be good enough any more.

I don't think that Microchip makes audio amplifiers. What Atmel product would you recommend?

The LM386 is very popular with hobbyists and radio amateurs who don't know any better. I very much doubt if any professional engineers use it any more. Have you compared the specs?

Leon

Leon Heller G1HSM

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Quote:

Have you compared the specs?

Presumably YOU have - so how's about a quick run-down of why th TDA is "better"? Power consumption? Noise?

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/Beginning to sound like a serious debate here/

I tried the TDA7052 today, and worked like a charm and i didnt use a single extra component not even a capacitor.Just a POT for volume control.

I tried the LM386 to noisy as hell,but probably because Im a noob and maybe some component values werent exact,especially the capacitors.

For the same amount of time spent , the TDA7052 worked out definitely better took me 10-15 min to assemble on the breadboard. It did cost more though about 60Rs(1 dollar and some cents) and LM386 10 Rs( few cents),but a little extra dough saved me a lot of trouble and provided me with volume control.

Having said that this is just my experience and other users might still prefer the LM386(although i still dont see many reasons for that). Just wanted to give a noob's perspective.

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Q.:

Quote:
Sure Leon, and what Microchip product would you recommend instead?

A.:
Quote:
I don't think that Microchip makes audio amplifiers. What Atmel product would you recommend?

:lol: :lol:

Like the old geezers told already: LM386 is old, a bit touchy to use: you MUST have proper decoupling and ground routing. In other words: it bites when not handled properly. Like uhm .... o, ... that's OffTopic ;)
The TDA7052: I used the TDA7052A, which has DC controlled volume control. Much more forgiving than the LM386.
My supplier: TDA7052A €1.- , LM386 €0.48

Nard

A GIF is worth a thousend words   They are called Rosa, Sylvia, Tricia, and Ulyana. You can find them https://www.linuxmint.com/

Dragon broken ? http://aplomb.nl/TechStuff/Dragon/Dragon.html for how-to-fix tips

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clawson wrote:
Quote:

Have you compared the specs?

Presumably YOU have - so how's about a quick run-down of why th TDA is "better"? Power consumption? Noise?

Quiescent current is the same.

LM386 THD is 10% at 325 mW, TDA7052 THD is 10% at 1.2W.

LM386 noise isn't specified, but it was pretty bad when I last used one, many years ago. The TDA7052 is 60 uV, typical.

The TDA7052 doesn't need any external components, and will therefore work out cheaper.

Leon

Leon Heller G1HSM

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leon_heller wrote:
clawson wrote:
Quote:

Have you compared the specs?

Presumably YOU have - so how's about a quick run-down of why th TDA is "better"? Power consumption? Noise?

Quiescent current is the same.

LM386 THD is 10% at 325 mW, TDA7052 THD is 10% at 1.2W.

LM386 noise isn't specified, but it was pretty bad when I last used one, many years ago. The TDA7052 is 60 uV, typical.

The TDA7052 doesn't need any external components, and will therefore work out cheaper.

Leon

Next can of worms:

Will the difference between amplifiers be appreciable given a (presumably) mediocre speaker and whatever housing it is attached to? Even assuming each chip is performing optimally?

-- Damien

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The noise and distortion will be just as noticeable, I'd have thought.

Leon

Leon Heller G1HSM

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hey im getting clicks on my audio output when i put a coupling capacitor at the input, how to avoid this im using 0.47uf capacitor right now

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Schematic?

Leon

Leon Heller G1HSM

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Plons wrote:
Q.:
Quote:
Sure Leon, and what Microchip product would you recommend instead?

A.:
Quote:
I don't think that Microchip makes audio amplifiers. What Atmel product would you recommend?

:lol: :lol:

AT73C240[1] :lol: :lol: :lol:

---
[1]Yes, I had to scrap the bottom of the barrel to find something in that area.

Stealing Proteus doesn't make you an engineer.

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telliott wrote:

I'll try to update with results of using the TS4871 in 2-3 weeks or so. The TDA7052 Leon mentioned looks good. Cheap and very simple. I like the standby option on the TS4871 though...

Got the new rev built up today. The TS4871 is much quieter than the LM386. Very small footprint too. It fits right between the speaker posts.