Good Curiosity Nano tutorial!

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#1
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Total votes: 3

I usually find online tutorials to be high on marketing speak and low on the sort of technical content that I'd like to see, but an ad for this Microcontrol tutorial popped up and I decided to check it out.

https://mu.microchip.com/rapid-p...

 

I found it very impressive.  There was a lot of info in there on the Curiosity board features and philosophy that is common (supposedly) across ALL of the boards, which I didn't even realize was a thing.  And some other stuff that I had never read the manuals carefully enough to realize, or match up.  Such as:

 

  1. Pinout commonality.
  2. Features of the virtual disk other than code loading.
  3. Hetails of operation for the USB/Serial conversion.
  4. What the DGI does, and how to use it.

 

Very little marketing, stayed away from details of coding, and was information-dense and well-paced.

 

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Total votes: 0

Excellent tutorial...thanks for the link

Happy Trails,

Mike

JaxCoder.com

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Total votes: 0

Excellent tutorial.    Microchip have achieved a good balance.

 

Incidentally,   Microchip have updated some of the older Atmel Application Notes

e.g. AN2451 Getting Started with Core Independent Peripherals on AVR® is rewritten as TB3218 Getting Started with Configurable Custom Logic (CCL)

 

David.

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Total votes: 1

westfw wrote:

I found it very impressive.  There was a lot of info in there on the Curiosity board features and philosophy that is common (supposedly) across ALL of the boards, which I didn't even realize was a thing.  And some other stuff that I had never read the manuals carefully enough to realize, or match up.  Such as:

 

  1. Pinout commonality.
  2. Features of the virtual disk other than code loading.
  3. Details of operation for the USB/Serial conversion.
  4. What the DGI does, and how to use it.

 

Very little marketing, stayed away from details of coding, and was information-dense and well-paced.

 

 

I can confirm that the same team has designed all the Curiosity Nano boards for the 8-bit MCUs and that a considerable amount of time has been used to make sure they follow the same design philosophy ;) All the boards use the same on-board debugger which runs the same (configurable) firmware so the details does match up between the boards.