Glue Recommendation

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#1
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I need to glue a radial electrolytic down onto a PCB to take a bit of strain off the solder joints (yeh, I know).

Any recommendations on glue type?

I'm thinking something silicon/rubber based to take up some of the gap and leave a bit of shock resistance. Anyone any experience of rubber-filled cyanoacryaltes?

#1 This forum helps those that help themselves

#2 All grounds are not created equal

#3 How have you proved that your chip is running at xxMHz?

#4 "If you think you need floating point to solve the problem then you don't understand the problem. If you really do need floating point then you have a problem you do not understand." - Heater's ex-boss

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Why not hot melt? Easy to apply, and available in formulations that will bond to plastics/metal/PCBs.

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I use hot melt. Fast and works great!

 

In consideration of others, please RTFM!

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Open up anything ever made by Amstrad and you'll find half the components glued down with a hot melt glue gun. Great stuff. On the rare occasions I ever manage to get a bit of delicate soldering to work I then douse it in hot melt glue to make sure it stays that way!

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I'll give the hot melt a go; if it doesn't work I can soon pull it off.

I've got a Tecbond 195 degree gun here along with some '232' adhesive which Tecbond says is OK for general purpose electronics.

It looks like the better option would be Polyamide based glue but I'd need a new (=expensive) 215 degree gun.

#1 This forum helps those that help themselves

#2 All grounds are not created equal

#3 How have you proved that your chip is running at xxMHz?

#4 "If you think you need floating point to solve the problem then you don't understand the problem. If you really do need floating point then you have a problem you do not understand." - Heater's ex-boss

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I've seen polyamide glue sticks with application temps of 135-190, so your current gun should be fine if you go that route. On the other hand, if you're buying a new gun, go for one that has interchangeable nozzles. We have one with a ~25mm long ~3mm wide 'needle' nozzle, it's a huge help for getting into tight spaces.

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Brian Fairchild wrote:
Anyone any experience of rubber-filled cyanoacryaltes?
No experience but there's Rubber-Toughened Bonding Agent by Tech-Bond.

"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

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Loctite 4105 is top notch stuff, but may be a bit expensive for casual use. We use it on Mil spec stuff to stick caps to pcbs....

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So in the end I treated myself to a new hot-melt glue gun, to save having to swap and flush sticks, and a pack of Tecbond 1942 hot-melt glue. Works a treat.

#1 This forum helps those that help themselves

#2 All grounds are not created equal

#3 How have you proved that your chip is running at xxMHz?

#4 "If you think you need floating point to solve the problem then you don't understand the problem. If you really do need floating point then you have a problem you do not understand." - Heater's ex-boss

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If the electrolytic is BIG then I would not solder it to the PCB.
But glue it down and solder it with wires to take the stress.