Gigabytes: No way!

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I got my start in programming when 64K was a LOT of ram to have in a computer.

 

We're having a problem now as we have an app that won't build in a linux computer with only 8Gig.

 

(I thought I was putting this in Off Topic)

The largest known prime number: 282589933-1

It's easy to stop breaking the 10th commandment! Break the 8th instead. 

Last Edited: Thu. Jun 27, 2019 - 09:03 PM
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I started with a 1K ram "computer", had enough space to run the monitor program and user programs. Then I managed to get another 6 chips on an expansion board then I had 4K.

 

That was HUGE and could run BASIC.

John Samperi

Ampertronics Pty. Ltd.

www.ampertronics.com.au

* Electronic Design * Custom Products * Contract Assembly

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The Commodore VIC-20 had 4K built-in and

you could buy a cartridge with an additional 4K.

I didn't have a way to save my work so I didn't

get very far with it.

 

--Mike

 

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My Timex Sinclair 1000 I think came with 2K built in, and I had the 16k expansion module.

 

And that bloody membrane keyboard.

 

 

My Commodore 64...64K

 

My Commodore PET - 16K

 

My CBM 4032 - 32k

 

I also had the CBM 4040 Dual Disk Drive unit as well.

 

Ahh the good old days!!

 

JIm

 

 

I would rather attempt something great and fail, than attempt nothing and succeed - Fortune Cookie

 

"The critical shortage here is not stuff, but time." - Johan Ekdahl

 

"Step N is required before you can do step N+1!" - ka7ehk

 

"If you want a career with a known path - become an undertaker. Dead people don't sue!" - Kartman

"Why is there a "Highway to Hell" and only a "Stairway to Heaven"? A prediction of the expected traffic load?"  - Lee "theusch"

 

Speak sweetly. It makes your words easier to digest when at a later date you have to eat them ;-)  - Source Unknown

Please Read: Code-of-Conduct

Atmel Studio6.2/AS7, DipTrace, Quartus, MPLAB, RSLogix user

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The MAINFRAME computer I started on (capable of supporting ~60 simultaneous users) had a maximum configuration of about 16Mbytes of RAM (4Mwords * 36bits)  2kwords of cache...
The biggest system I worked on had about 2GB of disk, four of those washing-machine sized things at 500MB each...

 

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Our HP9830A had 3808 words of memory.....and we had a card reader..I just ran across some of those cards the other day in an old box.

I have an old VIC-20 with 4K around here somewherzz.

When in the dark remember-the future looks brighter than ever.   I look forward to being able to predict the future!

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My first computer had 256 bytes. This is starting to sound like Four Yorkshiremen!

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My own first "computer" was an COSMAC ELF board. Toggle in a program byte by byte. RCA 1802 micro & a couple of 7 segment LED (single character) displays. Learned a lot from that board. Learned about program structuring and interrupts and interpreting both binary and hex. I may still have it.

 

Jim

Jim Wagner Oregon Research Electronics, Consulting Div. Tangent, OR, USA http://www.orelectronics.net

Last Edited: Thu. Jun 27, 2019 - 11:00 PM
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I remember really wishing I had an ELF system (nowadays kids wish for ELF on the shelf).

We used the CDP1802, since it was one of the first CMOS micros...great for battery power.

 

I used a Rockwell AIM65 6502 "development system" ---I still have an AIM65 book that I occasionally run into.

When in the dark remember-the future looks brighter than ever.   I look forward to being able to predict the future!

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My first computer had 128 bytes. You needed to add another toggle switch and a board to get to 256 bytes! A MK14 was luxury!

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I wanted to get an "Exidy Sourcerer," but couldn't raise the funds as a teen.

The largest known prime number: 282589933-1

It's easy to stop breaking the 10th commandment! Break the 8th instead. 

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My Timex Sinclair 1000 I think came with 2K built in, and I had the 16k expansion module.

Like Jim, I had (actually still have) a Timex Sinclair 1000 with a 16K memory expansion module.

I also had one of the original Sinclair units as a kit which preceded the Timex Sinclair version.

 

I broke the expansion bus out the back and routed it to the 16 K memory module, and to my expansion card, (Serial port and EEPROM burner).

 

The sticker has the "Basic" program to poke a few memory instructions to force it to start executing a User program stored somewhere else within its memory range.

 

The extra holes drilled in the case above the "1 2 3 " keys were for improved air flow over the PCB's power supply.

 

The colored ribbon cable is a lengthy RS-232 cable.  The computer often saw use as a terminal for dial up modem comm's.

 

JC

 

   

Last Edited: Fri. Jun 28, 2019 - 12:17 AM
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When I was a graduate student, the computer center had a CDC 6600 for the entire engineering/physics department.  I would walk my box of cards over every time I wanted a run, and pick up a stack of the big paper with green and white stripes and the holes along the side later in the day, hopefully with results and not a core dump.  If it was a thick output it was a core dump.  Just a few pages meant a successful calculation.  The kicker was the max memory I could request was 107k octal words, but I believe they were 64 bit words, so it is not as bad as it looks.  I thought it was a lot!  We used it to invert a 40 x 40 array to solve an integro-differential equation.  We thought we were pretty hot stuff.  Now I could do that calculation on my phone about 10 times faster or 100 times, or 1000 times.

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Like Jim, I had (actually still have) a Timex Sinclair 1000 with a 16K memory expansion module.

I also had one of the original Sinclair units as a kit which preceded the Timex Sinclair version

That's cool that you still have it!!  Before you know it, those treasure hunters will show up at your door & offer you $250 for it.  I'm waiting for them to stop here & see my large wall of databooks.

When in the dark remember-the future looks brighter than ever.   I look forward to being able to predict the future!

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avrcandies wrote:
Before you know it, those treasure hunters will show up at your door & offer you $250 for it.

 

Wished I had saved all my original MAC Classics and the associated hardware.  Same thing for my Commodore 64 with 2 external Disk Drives and the hundreds of games I had for it.

 

Jim

I would rather attempt something great and fail, than attempt nothing and succeed - Fortune Cookie

 

"The critical shortage here is not stuff, but time." - Johan Ekdahl

 

"Step N is required before you can do step N+1!" - ka7ehk

 

"If you want a career with a known path - become an undertaker. Dead people don't sue!" - Kartman

"Why is there a "Highway to Hell" and only a "Stairway to Heaven"? A prediction of the expected traffic load?"  - Lee "theusch"

 

Speak sweetly. It makes your words easier to digest when at a later date you have to eat them ;-)  - Source Unknown

Please Read: Code-of-Conduct

Atmel Studio6.2/AS7, DipTrace, Quartus, MPLAB, RSLogix user

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jgmdesign wrote:
Wished I had saved all my original MAC Classics and the associated hardware
Me too! :(

"Experience is what enables you to recognise a mistake the second time you make it."

"Good judgement comes from experience.  Experience comes from bad judgement."

"Wisdom is always wont to arrive late, and to be a little approximate on first possession."

"When you hear hoofbeats, think horses, not unicorns."

"Fast.  Cheap.  Good.  Pick two."

"We see a lot of arses on handlebars around here." - [J Ekdahl]

 

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Wished I had saved all my original MAC Classics and the associated hardware

Thirty years ago, someone gave me an ancient (it was from the 60's) boat-anchor Friden calculator, with a CRT display.  I regret getting rid of it, as it was one of the world's first all-electronic calculators (I either gave it away, or threw it away).   At least my back appreciates not lugging it around all these years!

https://www.ebay.com/itm/Vintage-1960s-Friden-EC-130-Electronic-Calculator-Untested/312632264736?hash=item48ca55c820:g:kh4AAOSw0EJc7aWK

When in the dark remember-the future looks brighter than ever.   I look forward to being able to predict the future!

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ka7ehk wrote:
My own first "computer" was an COSMAC ELF board. Toggle in a program byte by byte. RCA 1802 micro & a couple of 7 segment LED (single character) displays
That sounds exactly like the one I had too! Thinking back now it was a VERY clever design as there was NO firmware whatsoever. Just the 256 bytes of SRAM, no ROM. The way that worked was because the 1802 actually had a very clever DMA mode. So with a hex keypad and a couple of latches (and also a couple of 74 7-seg drivers. You could "clock" bytes into the RAM one at a time. Another button reset PC and let the code execute. If you made a mistake part way through entering your hand assembled 1802 code you had to start over. More important than anything the "Q" output had an LED on it.

 

Unlike boards such as MK14, that were contemporary, unfortunately this design never really made the "big time" so I don't know if there was even a "company" behind it or whether it was just some bloke making the board kits up in his back bedroom. As such I don't think it had a commercial name to locate it.

 

I also had a very early Sinclair ZX80 we built from a kit (our one was serial 00000335 I seem to remember) but I lent it to Microsoft UK at some point, as they were setting up an exhibition of "early home computers", and the bastards went and lost it. angry

 

While I later got an Acorn Atom my twin got the Tangerine Microtan 6502 - with only the hex pad (we didn't pay for a QWERTY) it was kind of fun typing in 2K of hex digits for it to run space invaders! At least that one let you go back and edit typing mistakes.

 

(I see ZX80 on ebay for £600 now!)

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hehe

 

My point was: You can't build this app on a computer with "only 8 gig?"

The largest known prime number: 282589933-1

It's easy to stop breaking the 10th commandment! Break the 8th instead. 

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Torby wrote:
My point was: You can't build this app on a computer with "only 8 gig?"

That must be one h**l of a symbol table!

 

Jim

 

Click Link: Get Free Stock: Retire early! PM for strategy

share.robinhood.com/jamesc3274
get $5 free gold/silver https://www.onegold.com/join/713...

 

 

 

 

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Yea. Sometimes I wonder what they're making.

 

I'd bet you could do this in an xMega with an external server holding things like the css and image files. I hear them say things like, "but I'd have to define 9 thousand new variables for each one of those you want to record."

The largest known prime number: 282589933-1

It's easy to stop breaking the 10th commandment! Break the 8th instead. 

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When I was a cub scout our fearless leader took us on a field trip to see a computer.  It must have been in the early sixties.  We went in a room with a box that sort of looked like a refrigerator and had a teletype on a table next to it.  I thought to myself what is the big deal.  It made no impression on me at all.  Little did I know I would spend 40 years of my live writing code for one of them.

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Little did I know I would spend 40 years of my live writing code for one of them.

 They forgot to show you the poster: computers are a huge time-saver & a revolutionary source of endless leisure for mankind.     crying

 

I find the 15 hours a day I spend on the internet a HUGE timesaver...I couldn't imagine how much tougher things would be without this gain in efficiency.  

When in the dark remember-the future looks brighter than ever.   I look forward to being able to predict the future!

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Well, we now have a large supply of cat videos which need watching.

 

--Mike