GCC based Ada compiler released for AVR

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Snipped from usenet

Quote:

It's been available for almost three weeks now, but I was away on a
business trip without good internet access. Anyway, here is the
announcement:

[Announce] AVR-Ada V0.2.1 released

We are proud to announce a new release of AVR-Ada, one of the first
GCC based Ada compilers targeting 8-bit microcontrolers.

You can get the project description and some documentation at

avr-ada.sourceforge.net

The SF development pages with the download section are at

www.sourceforge.net/projects/avr...

AVR-Ada is available in source form only. Binary packages of the
cross compiler hosted on Linux and Windows are expected to appear with
future releases of cdk4avr (cdk4avr.sourceforge.net) and WinAVR
(winavr.sourceforge.net).

Feel free to join the mailing list at

http://lists.sourceforge.net/mai....

It has quite low traffic.

Ehh...

Btw : Who's using Ada , for what ???
Is that the language that US governement requires
everything made in ???

/Bingo

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as far as i know C is good enough for goverment projects... :D

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I have never even heard of this programming language before.
What's the prupose of using this language when everyone else use C/C++ as programming language for embedded programming?

I looked up ADA in the encyclopedia here:
http://encyclopedia.thefreedicti...

Bingo600 wrote:
Is that the language that US governement requires
everything made in ???

Quote from the encyclopedia:
Quote:
The US Department of Defense required the use of Ada (the Ada mandate) for every software project where new code was more than 30% of result, though exceptions to this rule were often granted. This requirement was effectively removed in 1997. Similar requirements existed in other North Atlantic Treaty Organization countries.

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Quote:
I have never even heard of this programming language before.

Ignorance is bliss... :wink:

IIRC Ada surfaced in the 1980s and I think the intent at the time was for a universal programming language to be used throughout US government.

The language has its name after Ada Lovelace, assistant to Charles Babbage who designed mechanical computing machinery in the 19th century. She is often considered the first programmer. (Babbages machines where only partly implemented by himself. The successful implementation of the Difference Engine where done by the brothers Georg and Edvard Scheutz, from Sweden of course...)

I seem to recall that the language came about through a contest, arranged by the US government, between several competing "language design teams".

The language has some similarities to languages in the Algol-family (eg. Pascal, Modula-2) and some to the IBM-behemoth-language PL/1. It has strong type checking and support for modularization, but not for object-orientation (no inheritance and polymorphism,this could have changed since the 80s though).

Quote:
What's the prupose of using this language when everyone else use C/C++ as programming language for embedded programming?

Answer #1: "Everyone else"? Really?

#2: Source code in Ada that is to be ported to an AVR?

#3: Good knowledge of the language?

#4: Sheer fun?

Going off-track now..: Personally I'd love to program in a language which by default has strong type-checking, bounds checking etc and a high abstraction of the hardware. (For me the thing in the paranthesis afer an if should be a strong typed bool, not any freakin' value that can be interpreted as a number equal, or not, to zero.) Then again I'm seldomly pressed for optimization in the things I do with AVRs, not in execution time, nor in code size. I'm a hobbyist and can happily pay the few $ extra for a bigger AVR when I need one. I also believe that it is rare that I can do a better job optimizing than a compiler. This does not in any way mean that I don't understand that for the "professional embedded programmer" a few cents can mean make or break for a product, and that they know when and how to optimize hard. My opinion comes in part from 20+ years as both a programmer (non-embedded apps) and a teacher of programming. The thing to optimize when doing s/w for eg. a Windows app is development time, product stability and maintainability. So flame me :D

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30 years in the military training simulator business has allowed me to watch how languages used in training systems has changed. The military weapon systems software went thru similar life cycle. In the 70s was a mishmash of proprietary computers and languages... some Dept of Defense study showed millions going to maintain this mess...
At ECC simulators, we used a homemade 6800 based training computer called the EC3 thru the mid 70s... every training simulator job magically became a job for an EC3.... we had a self hosted line editor, absolute assembler, and a rudimentary file system that thought the single side single density floppies were one big file like a cassette. We had a cross assembler on a nova with a teletype (assembled 6800 assy, written in nove assy). In the 80s we used vaxes and vms and fortran, then went to ada as the requirements trickled down from the real systems to the training systems.
For a while DoD mandated a common computer architecture... this was somewhat successful, but by the time the std cpu got second sourced, it was obsoleted by some commercial off the shelf cheaper processor. The Ada mandate was indeed the result of a fly off between different languages developed from requirements... strongly typed, but also has tasks built into the language.... The COTS directive allows commercial computers and software and compilers to be considered. There werent enough Ada programmers in the world to provide the millions of lines of code needed in all the weapon systems sw... planes, tanks, artillery....space battle stations...

Imagecraft compiler user

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BTW, I've been aware of AVR-Ada for some time now (I'm on their mailing list). At some point in the future, it will probably be included in WinAVR, once it's a little more stabilized, which IIRC is not too far off....