FTDI and Prolific....only two games in town?

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I am toying with the FTDI device, and it is very easy to work with, but not cheap.

 

I looked online at Prolific, but the horror stories I have heard about the devices makes me apprehensive.

 

There has been mention of the CH340x family and I can get those from Octopart, and the price is certainly right, but again, I know little about the company and not much about Octopart.  The only website I can find for the CH340 is:

 

http://wch.cn

 

But that goes nowhere.  The other odd thing is that the USB pins on the part connect DIRECTLY to the USB pins of the connector I will supply where I am used to seeing a couple of series resistors.

 

SO, Prolific is out as far as I am concerned.  The FTDI is a little pricey, and the CH340 is the dark horse in this race.

 

Can anyone shed light on experiences with OCTOPART, and/or the CH340 part?  I can live with the translated datasheets for it and if the vendor actually delivers great.  My only concern is I am going to need possibly 1000 of these and I do not want to design the board for them and end up screwed.

 

JIm

This topic has a solution.

I would rather attempt something great and fail, than attempt nothing and succeed - Fortune Cookie

 

"The critical shortage here is not stuff, but time." - Johan Ekdahl

 

"Step N is required before you can do step N+1!" - ka7ehk

 

"If you want a career with a known path - become an undertaker. Dead people don't sue!" - Kartman

"Why is there a "Highway to Hell" and only a "Stairway to Heaven"? A prediction of the expected traffic load?"  - Lee "theusch"

 

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Please Read: Code-of-Conduct

Atmel Studio6.2/AS7, DipTrace, Quartus, MPLAB, RSLogix user

Last Edited: Fri. Jan 8, 2016 - 03:57 AM
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The FT232 does not use series resistors (at least not in the suggested circuits in the spec sheet). I use a USB transient protector on the inputs. Don't know anything about CH340. My initial reaction is that if it is that good, it ought to be widely available. FTDI was not at first.

 

Jim

 

Until Black Lives Matter, we do not have "All Lives Matter"!

 

 

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There are also parts from Silicon Labs: http://www.silabs.com/products/i...

 

And NXP: http://www.nxp.com/products/micr...

 

And, of course, many microcontrollers can do USB themselves these days ...

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If a device is successful and has a high retail price,   counterfeits will appear.

 

This happened to Prolific,  and now it has happened to FTDI.

 

I am not an USB expert,  but I guess that implementing a USB->UART chip could be done with any popular controller with the appropriate hardware.     So if you can sell a $0.50 controller as a working Brand-Name chip,  it is worth their while.

 

The real mystery is : "Why Prolific?"  .   It was already a cheap chip

FTDI has always been worth counterfeiting.   It did not happen until recently.

 

Both Prolific and FTDI were not very happy.    Meanwhile there were a lot of punters that thought they had bought genuine chips.    Punters were unhappy when FTDI chose to disable / destroy millions of gadgets bought by honest punters.

 

Mind you,  it must have been a bit of a clue when Ebay vendors advertise "Arduino clones with FTDI" or "USB adapters with FTDI" at knockdown prices.

 

Currently the CH340G chips sell very well and very cheaply.    The earlier CHxxx chips were not very good.   The CH340G works fine.  The driver works "fairly" fine.

 

David.

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david.prentice wrote:
The driver works "fairly" fine.

As a user (rather than designer-in) of these things, I would say that this is where FTDI wins hands down.

 

Of all the various USB-to-Serial thingies that I have, the FTDI drivers are rock-solid and full-featured.

 

For all of the Prolific-based things, the drivers are (far) inferior - the biggest deficiency being that they will choose a different COM: number for each different USB socket on the computer!!

 

angry

 

(I guess this may well not be Prolific's fault as such - quite possibly just incompetent implementors?)

 

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Thanks Andy.  The Silicon Labs device is half the cost of FTDI and NXP, but almost 3X the cost of the CH340 in 1000 piece quantity. 

 

Looks like the triangle of development must be consulted again.  I can have it Reliable, Cheap, or Fast..... Pick two. frown

 

 

The earlier CHxxx chips were not very good.   The CH340G works fine.  The driver works "fairly" fine.

THis is encouraging information!  I ordered a few CH340 modules to play with.

 

The quest continues......

 

Thanks for the feedback.

 

Jim

I would rather attempt something great and fail, than attempt nothing and succeed - Fortune Cookie

 

"The critical shortage here is not stuff, but time." - Johan Ekdahl

 

"Step N is required before you can do step N+1!" - ka7ehk

 

"If you want a career with a known path - become an undertaker. Dead people don't sue!" - Kartman

"Why is there a "Highway to Hell" and only a "Stairway to Heaven"? A prediction of the expected traffic load?"  - Lee "theusch"

 

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I agree that FTDI chips and drivers are rock-solid.

 

OTOH,  I would be wary of selling products with FTDI after the "disable" episode.    Punters will be nervous that it might happen again.    Even though all your products have bona-fide chips. 

 

David.

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david.prentice wrote:
The [CH340G] driver works "fairly" fine.

Remember that the only thing your customers are actually going to see is, effectively, the driver.

 

They will neither know nor care which chip you use, but will be hit by any driver annoyances ...

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Maxim also has/had one. Have not heard much about it recently. I would guess that between price and unreliable supply, folks would have been reluctant to use it (I never would).

 

Jim

 

Until Black Lives Matter, we do not have "All Lives Matter"!

 

 

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Nowadays Arduino's use CH340. Have seen quite a few, on various PC's and it all works fine. No problems so far.

( Not tested with Win10, I still refuse to use that )

The 50 mil pin spacing (SOIC) makes it attractive too.

 

Atmel's own 8u2 and 16u2 are a good alternative though! Familiar stuff, nice forum  (friendly) ......

but you need a crystal and ISP-pins. And probably more.

 

FTDI: my favorite. Smart design, well documented, proper support and versatile. When I need more than plain USB to UART, that is the chip of my choice.

 

Prolific: too much driver-troubles in the recent past

 

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jgmdesign wrote:

 The Silicon Labs device is half the cost of FTDI and NXP, but almost 3X the cost of the CH340 in 1000 piece quantity. 

Looks like the triangle of development must be consulted again.  I can have it Reliable, Cheap, or Fast..... Pick two. frown

The only info I can find on CH340G has it using an external 12MHz crystal.

As too does the Freescale(NXP) offering.

 

FTDI and SiLabs et al ceased doing that a long time ago.

 

Many of the cheap USB devices also limit the BAUD choices. SiLabs and FTDI do not do that.

 

For SiLabs I find CP2105 = Dual UART, $1.40/1k, CP2104  Single Uart  $1.33/1k

 

You could also look at EFM8UB1 from Silabs, that shows for ~60c/1k & they have libraries that use their CP21xx drivers.

You can probably swallow other parts into that, for further savings.

 

Exar also have some USB Bridge Uarts,

https://www.exar.com/connectivit...

but they are not at the cheap end of your triangle, however,  they are the fastest 12MHz USB UARTS we have tested, and have the finest Baud granularity.  Their price curve looks steeper, so you could check into > 1k

 

What specs do you actually NEED ?

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Hmmmm,

The crystal/no crystal is a major factor I had not thought about.  I can get the CH340G for $0.63/each in 1000 piece lots.  But add the crystal and two caps and I am in the range of $1.20 per unit.

 

Of course I plan on the whole thing (PCB and Assembly) being done by PCBWay so I will have to see what the total cost comes out to.  At the same time using them means they will buy the parts so in the grand scheme I may not get authentic parts to begin with - Risks all the way around.

 

Atmel's own 8u2 and 16u2 are a good alternative though! Familiar stuff, nice forum  (friendly) ......

but you need a crystal and ISP-pins. And probably more.

I had thought about this as the USB must talk to an AVR, but I do not know how much code space the actual app needs and then there is getting LUFA to fit in with the whole thing.  The cost is almost a wash between using an AVR and the USB/TTL pair as opposed to a single AVR.  There are some other parameters that I cannot get into which makes using the pair a better choice at this time, but maybe after the first 1000 are out the dos a rework might be in order.

 

Will have to look more at pricing and see the numbers side by side.

 

JIm

I would rather attempt something great and fail, than attempt nothing and succeed - Fortune Cookie

 

"The critical shortage here is not stuff, but time." - Johan Ekdahl

 

"Step N is required before you can do step N+1!" - ka7ehk

 

"If you want a career with a known path - become an undertaker. Dead people don't sue!" - Kartman

"Why is there a "Highway to Hell" and only a "Stairway to Heaven"? A prediction of the expected traffic load?"  - Lee "theusch"

 

Speak sweetly. It makes your words easier to digest when at a later date you have to eat them ;-)  - Source Unknown

Please Read: Code-of-Conduct

Atmel Studio6.2/AS7, DipTrace, Quartus, MPLAB, RSLogix user

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jgmdesign wrote:

Hmmmm,

The crystal/no crystal is a major factor I had not thought about.  I can get the CH340G for $0.63/each in 1000 piece lots.  But add the crystal and two caps and I am in the range of $1.20 per unit.

 

Of course I plan on the whole thing (PCB and Assembly) being done by PCBWay so I will have to see what the total cost comes out to.  At the same time using them means they will buy the parts so in the grand scheme I may not get authentic parts to begin with - Risks all the way around.

Sounds like a good reason to stick more main stream.

 

jgmdesign wrote:

Atmel's own 8u2 and 16u2 are a good alternative though! Familiar stuff, nice forum  (friendly) ......

but you need a crystal and ISP-pins. And probably more.

I had thought about this as the USB must talk to an AVR, but I do not know how much code space the actual app needs and then there is getting LUFA to fit in with the whole thing.  The cost is almost a wash between using an AVR and the USB/TTL pair as opposed to a single AVR.  There are some other parameters that I cannot get into which makes using the pair a better choice at this time, but maybe after the first 1000 are out the dos a rework might be in order.

The 8u2 does not look cheap, but you can easily try a EFM8UB1 for just $30  for the STK, and see how their examples run up.

 

What Baud speed(s) do you actually need, and what other functions ?

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What Baud speed(s) do you actually need, and what other functions ?

Baud rte is a non issue as all the parts listed so far handle all the common speeds.  As far as other functions go just the sync lines.

 

All very basic.

 

Looking at the choices the CH340G may be the best option overall as they seem to be readily available in the PAC-RIM where the boards are going to be made so I would think that I would have a better shot at getting a real one as opposed to the FTDI

 

Again, it's a risk all the way around.

 

JIm

I would rather attempt something great and fail, than attempt nothing and succeed - Fortune Cookie

 

"The critical shortage here is not stuff, but time." - Johan Ekdahl

 

"Step N is required before you can do step N+1!" - ka7ehk

 

"If you want a career with a known path - become an undertaker. Dead people don't sue!" - Kartman

"Why is there a "Highway to Hell" and only a "Stairway to Heaven"? A prediction of the expected traffic load?"  - Lee "theusch"

 

Speak sweetly. It makes your words easier to digest when at a later date you have to eat them ;-)  - Source Unknown

Please Read: Code-of-Conduct

Atmel Studio6.2/AS7, DipTrace, Quartus, MPLAB, RSLogix user

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jgmdesign wrote:
I ordered a few CH340 modules to play with.
Digi-Key and Mouser can stock the Seeed CH340G module.

http://www.digikey.com/product-search/en/computers-office-components-accessories/adapters/3670173?k=ch340

http://www.mouser.com/Seeed-Studio/_/N-1yoj29v?Keyword=ch340&FS=True

http://www.seeedstudio.com/depot/CH340G-USB-to-Serial-TTL-ModuleAdapter-p-2359.html

 

Olimex has moved from FTDI to CH340T in one open source hardware module; Olimex has a number of distributors.

https://olimex.wordpress.com/2015/06/26/new-kicad-oshw-pcb-project-getting-rid-of-ftdi-bb-ch340t-usb-to-serial-converter/

The Olimex module does not have any handshaking signals, like DTR, on its connector.

"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

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Yes I know those vendors have the modules, but I need the actual IC.

 

Thanks,

 

JIm

I would rather attempt something great and fail, than attempt nothing and succeed - Fortune Cookie

 

"The critical shortage here is not stuff, but time." - Johan Ekdahl

 

"Step N is required before you can do step N+1!" - ka7ehk

 

"If you want a career with a known path - become an undertaker. Dead people don't sue!" - Kartman

"Why is there a "Highway to Hell" and only a "Stairway to Heaven"? A prediction of the expected traffic load?"  - Lee "theusch"

 

Speak sweetly. It makes your words easier to digest when at a later date you have to eat them ;-)  - Source Unknown

Please Read: Code-of-Conduct

Atmel Studio6.2/AS7, DipTrace, Quartus, MPLAB, RSLogix user

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jgmdesign wrote:

 

Looking at the choices the CH340G may be the best option overall as they seem to be readily available in the PAC-RIM where the boards are going to be made so I would think that I would have a better shot at getting a real one as opposed to the FTDI

 

Again, it's a risk all the way around.

 Could pay to get the PCB assembler to quote on multiple, and get modules with each choice so you can prove the  SW side of things, in typical user cases.

 

 You want to avoid choosing the cheapest chip, only to find your customers have driver-nightmares.

 

Having many modules in the labs also helps development, as you can quickly prove if it is an issue related to one vendor.

 

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I just saw this & am somewhat alarmed as we use the FT232 in products...is there still an issue? 

 

After poking around the web, apparently FTDI has disabled chips by deploying new drivers.  How do they determine which chips are to be disabled?

So far we have had no complaints, so our chips are likely "genuine".

 

I did buy some TO-220 temperature protected mosfets overseas (to lower cost) last year, at a great price (like 1/4 US distributor cost).

Trouble was, during my follow-up testing I could never get the protection to kick in (it worked perfectly during prototyping)--even after removing the heatsink.  Turns out, these had no protection--they were labeled as such, but were fake devices.

I was surprised at how well they did work--these FET's seemed to hum along up to around 550 degrees (F) , switching 20-30 amps around 100 Hz, with no sign of trouble, stress, or strain.

They actually seemed indestructible (for the few hours I tried to roast them).  At least if I got super-cheap fake parts they worked good! But obviously wouldn't use them since they didn't have the protection we needed.

It was fun applying 100W soldering iron & a heat gun trying (without success) to destroy them.

When in the dark remember-the future looks brighter than ever.   I look forward to being able to predict the future!

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AFIK, the clone chips all worked fine with the existing drivers. However, FTDI could detect the differences by diagnosing differnces in registers, timing, ...
Having detected genuine and clone, FTDI disabled the clones.
If your products contained genuine FTDI, your customers would be fine.
If the same customer happens to own another device that had the clone, it would fail mysteriously.
I would certainly avoid any product that claimed to use FTDI but seems to be cheap.
And if your products are assembled in China, the assembly house might be using clones without your knowledge.

As I said earlier, I can understand the FTDI clones. I do not see the commercial advantage in cloning Prolific chips.

Both companies have suffered.

David.

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Nowadays Arduino's use CH340.

 No, some "Arduino compatibles" use CH340.  Both "genuine" arduino companies are using Atmel 16u2 chips.

 

I am toying with the FTDI device, and it is very easy to work with, but not cheap.

Are you looking at the new generating (FT230x and related, rather than FT232)?  They're about half the price of the older chips.

 

The other "common" chip you didn't mention is the Cypress CP2101.

 

Microchip and TI have USB/Serial converters as well.  And these days there are a relatively wide set of USB-capable general purpose microcontrollers that could be used as serial converters as well, but the driver issues become significant...

 

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Great information Westfw. Will look at the those suggestions

Jim

I would rather attempt something great and fail, than attempt nothing and succeed - Fortune Cookie

 

"The critical shortage here is not stuff, but time." - Johan Ekdahl

 

"Step N is required before you can do step N+1!" - ka7ehk

 

"If you want a career with a known path - become an undertaker. Dead people don't sue!" - Kartman

"Why is there a "Highway to Hell" and only a "Stairway to Heaven"? A prediction of the expected traffic load?"  - Lee "theusch"

 

Speak sweetly. It makes your words easier to digest when at a later date you have to eat them ;-)  - Source Unknown

Please Read: Code-of-Conduct

Atmel Studio6.2/AS7, DipTrace, Quartus, MPLAB, RSLogix user

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"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

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What voltage and how much current does the board use?

 

One of the additional features of the FTDI is that one can use it's internal 3.3 V power supply to power the remainder of a low power board.

I don't have the data sheet out, but I think 3.3V @ 50 mA is easily available, (I don't recall the spec on the max current available).

 

Depending upon the project, this could eliminate the power supply portion of the project.

 

JC

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BTW, I've never had any problems with FTDI USB bridge chips on any of my Windows PCs.

 

I've had several Prolific problems, eventually resolvable, but not without great diffiiculty.

(Except for one USB to Serial converter, with a Prolific chip, that only works on Pre-Win7 systems).

 

I recall removing and reloading Prolific drivers without success, (many times, reboot, reboot, re-boot...).

I finally followed the directions, EXACTLY, as listed in a HAM forum, for the Prolific chip/driver, and it finally worked.

It was never clear to me what the actual difference was between the routine driver replacement method and the one that worked.

All-in-all I still recall it as a very unpleasant experience.

 

JC

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DocJC wrote:

All-in-all I still recall it as a very unpleasant experience.

Especially because it takes so much time !

And then, the next day, the error returns ... like the Jedi frown

 

Btw Jay, the 10k is almost there ! yes

 

Nard

A GIF is worth a thousend words   They are called Rosa, Sylvia, Tessa and Tina, You can find them https://www.linuxmint.com/

Dragon broken ? http://aplomb.nl/TechStuff/Dragon/Dragon.html for how-to-fix tips

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Isn't Octopart just a parts search engine?

Leon

Leon Heller G1HSM

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Would have been easier to keep PC serial ports available, then....no converter needed

 

I suppose when USB eventually "goes away", we'll need usb converters to allow us to use our serial port converters.

When in the dark remember-the future looks brighter than ever.   I look forward to being able to predict the future!

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I've been away for a few days so only just saw this thread. Bit surprised no one has mentioned this:

 

http://www.microchip.com/wwwprod...

 

so far. (not even Leon!) 

 

But if this is an AVR based device why are you even considering a separate USB-UART? As has been mentioned in passing there are many USB enabled AVRs and you'd just stick LUFA into it doing CDC-ACM and you'd likely have your solution for a lot less than a dedicated, separate $1 chip. 

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I thought of it. :-) But I'm stuck in hospital with just a Smartphone and it would be difficult to find suitable devices. I was hit by a taxi while crossing the road - his fault - resulting in a broken pelvis.

Leon Heller G1HSM

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clawson wrote:

I've been away for a few days so only just saw this thread. Bit surprised no one has mentioned this:

http://www.microchip.com/wwwprod...

so far.

 

That's similar to the NXP(Freescale) one, IIRC it also needs a crystal & has limited Baud, and is not exactly cheap.

 

clawson wrote:

But if this is an AVR based device why are you even considering a separate USB-UART? As has been mentioned in passing there are many USB enabled AVRs and you'd just stick LUFA into it doing CDC-ACM and you'd likely have your solution for a lot less than a dedicated, separate $1 chip. 

That would be true, if every AVR had 'USB in the corner', - problem is, the choice of USB AVRs is somewhat limited.

Digikey says cheapest are in 44 pin packages, & those in the XMega family and still $1.51/1k

The ATMEGA8U2 comes in at $2.16/1k, in TQFP32 - nowhere near the new EFM8UB1 in price.

 

Sure, it is worth looking into single chip - the OP may be lucky, and be able to fit both his code, and USB, into one device.

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clawson:

But if this is an AVR based device why are you even considering a separate USB-UART? As has been mentioned in passing there are many USB enabled AVRs and you'd just stick LUFA into it doing CDC-ACM and you'd likely have your solution for a lot less than a dedicated, separate $1 chip. 

The ATmega32u4 costs about $4.00usd in 1000 piece quantity, and I don't know if LUFA will play nicely with the app that is pretty much finished.

 

Will ponder, but probably will not pursue.

 

JIm

I would rather attempt something great and fail, than attempt nothing and succeed - Fortune Cookie

 

"The critical shortage here is not stuff, but time." - Johan Ekdahl

 

"Step N is required before you can do step N+1!" - ka7ehk

 

"If you want a career with a known path - become an undertaker. Dead people don't sue!" - Kartman

"Why is there a "Highway to Hell" and only a "Stairway to Heaven"? A prediction of the expected traffic load?"  - Lee "theusch"

 

Speak sweetly. It makes your words easier to digest when at a later date you have to eat them ;-)  - Source Unknown

Please Read: Code-of-Conduct

Atmel Studio6.2/AS7, DipTrace, Quartus, MPLAB, RSLogix user

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And integration with E-CAD.

Blog

Octopart and CircuitMaker

by Ben Jordan

Sep 08, 2015

http://blog.circuitmaker.com/#Blogs/octopart-and-circuitmaker

...

... Octopart as a component database ...

...

Octopart has a really awesome BOM tool which is a perfect fit for the CircuitMaker (and Altium) community, as well as an Excel add-in and the Common Parts Libraries, all completely free.

...

"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

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The ATmega32u4 costs about $4.00usd in 1000 piece quantity, and I don't know if LUFA will play nicely with the app that is pretty much finished.

Ah I guess I missed that detail. I thought you were at the design phase not just trying to shoehorn something already existing into the hardware.

 

It's certainly true that if one is starting out to look at a new design that is going to involve USB, even just the CDC-ACM variety, that it could well prove cheaper/easier in the overall system cost to use a single $4 AVR rather than a $3 AVR and a $1.5 USB-UART chip but as Who-me points out this does limit your AVR choice unless you are willing to look at the wider range of Xmega-USB chips but that, in itself, could introduce other limitations.

 

But for what you want to achieve here it's possible that just AVR + external interface chip is the "easier" solution.

 

BTW it's interesting to note that after a while of making 328+FTDI Arduinos they later made 32U4 based ones ( https://www.arduino.cc/en/Main/A... ) in which the two chips were absorbed into just one. I presume that was done for "cost engineering" purposes.

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Clawson, post #20 mentioned Microchip. :)

 

Leon! My wish is you heal quickly! Sorry to hear! Hope your hospital stay is short and makes you well.

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jgmdesign wrote:
THis is encouraging information!  I ordered a few CH340 modules to play with.

Hi - Where did you purchase them?

"When all else fails, read the directions"

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I have used 100's of counterfeit Arduino Nano's which use CH340.  They are rock solid!

The CH340's are so cheap there is no point in knocking them off, so that it is unlikely to have the Prolific driver bullshat with the CH340.   Support China!

Charles Darwin, Lord Kelvin & Murphy are always lurking about!
Lee -.-
Riddle me this...How did the serpent move around before the fall?

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PhillyNJ wrote:

jgmdesign wrote:
THis is encouraging information!  I ordered a few CH340 modules to play with.

Hi - Where did you purchase them?

 

HEre:

http://www.ebay.com/itm/USB-RS23...

 

he CH340's are so cheap there is no point in knocking them off,

Too bad I am having a helluva time finding a supplier of just the IC.  Alibaba probably.

 

Jim

I would rather attempt something great and fail, than attempt nothing and succeed - Fortune Cookie

 

"The critical shortage here is not stuff, but time." - Johan Ekdahl

 

"Step N is required before you can do step N+1!" - ka7ehk

 

"If you want a career with a known path - become an undertaker. Dead people don't sue!" - Kartman

"Why is there a "Highway to Hell" and only a "Stairway to Heaven"? A prediction of the expected traffic load?"  - Lee "theusch"

 

Speak sweetly. It makes your words easier to digest when at a later date you have to eat them ;-)  - Source Unknown

Please Read: Code-of-Conduct

Atmel Studio6.2/AS7, DipTrace, Quartus, MPLAB, RSLogix user

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LDEVRIES wrote:
... knocking them off, ...
Some of the CH340 are in SOIC (easy to prototype); CH340 are also in SSOP (more difficult).

Ian Lesnet located some CH340 SOIC projects :

  • Isolated USB to serial (DTR signal included)
  • USB to serial via a SOIC-to-DIP adapter

Ian also posted some solutions for CH340G versus CH340R and CH340T.


http://dangerousprototypes.com/?s=ch340

Fix (or break) it

CH340G In eagle

by Ian

30th November 2014

http://fobit.blogspot.com/2014/11/ch340g-in-eagle.html

Edit : typo.

"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

Last Edited: Thu. Jan 7, 2016 - 04:22 PM
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Welcome back Lee.

 

Ross McKenzie ValuSoft Melbourne Australia

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jgmdesign wrote:

he CH340's are so cheap there is no point in knocking them off,

Too bad I am having a helluva time finding a supplier of just the IC.  Alibaba probably.

 

Jim

 

Aliexpress... 31.5 cents each in lots of 100.

 

http://www.aliexpress.com/item/C...

Ross McKenzie ValuSoft Melbourne Australia

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Thanks Ross!

 

I may have a solution and Cliff was on the right track.  I have to test something out first though.

 

Jim

I would rather attempt something great and fail, than attempt nothing and succeed - Fortune Cookie

 

"The critical shortage here is not stuff, but time." - Johan Ekdahl

 

"Step N is required before you can do step N+1!" - ka7ehk

 

"If you want a career with a known path - become an undertaker. Dead people don't sue!" - Kartman

"Why is there a "Highway to Hell" and only a "Stairway to Heaven"? A prediction of the expected traffic load?"  - Lee "theusch"

 

Speak sweetly. It makes your words easier to digest when at a later date you have to eat them ;-)  - Source Unknown

Please Read: Code-of-Conduct

Atmel Studio6.2/AS7, DipTrace, Quartus, MPLAB, RSLogix user

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Except for need for the external crystal, and the lack of English documentation, the CH340 seems like a nice chip.  I wish someone else had done an SOIC USB/Serial chip a long time ago...

 

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westfw wrote:

Except for need for the external crystal, and the lack of English documentation, the CH340 seems like a nice chip.  I wish someone else had done an SOIC USB/Serial chip a long time ago...

The EFM8UB1 comes in gull wing SOIC, and does not need a crystal.

The QSOP24 is the same size package as SO14/SO16, but with half the lead pitch.

A SO16 version could be interesting.

Prolific have a SO8 USB device, but that one has severely limited handshake options.

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Congratulations...

 

Ross McKenzie ValuSoft Melbourne Australia

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valusoft wrote:

Congratulations...

 

Well done!

 

Jim

I would rather attempt something great and fail, than attempt nothing and succeed - Fortune Cookie

 

"The critical shortage here is not stuff, but time." - Johan Ekdahl

 

"Step N is required before you can do step N+1!" - ka7ehk

 

"If you want a career with a known path - become an undertaker. Dead people don't sue!" - Kartman

"Why is there a "Highway to Hell" and only a "Stairway to Heaven"? A prediction of the expected traffic load?"  - Lee "theusch"

 

Speak sweetly. It makes your words easier to digest when at a later date you have to eat them ;-)  - Source Unknown

Please Read: Code-of-Conduct

Atmel Studio6.2/AS7, DipTrace, Quartus, MPLAB, RSLogix user

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valusoft wrote:

Congratulations...

Hehe  - it's never good to see how many posts gave crept onto the counter over time...

 

Still a minnow compared with

jgmdesign:   Total posts: 9996
valusoft:    Total posts: 10208

 

someone is about to break 10k :)

 

Last Edited: Fri. Jan 8, 2016 - 03:29 AM
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Come on Jim... just 4 more.

 

Ross McKenzie ValuSoft Melbourne Australia

Last Edited: Fri. Jan 8, 2016 - 03:28 AM
This reply has been marked as the solution. 
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Well the solution belongs to Who-me and clawson on this project, but since I cannot flag their posts combined I will give credit here, and tag this post as the solution.

 

It turns out the Mega32u4 IS the optimal solution.  Turns out that client I have wrote everything in Arduino-ese on an UNO so moving from the UNO to the Leonardo did not phase anything.  Load the bootloader into the AVR and then load the application and POOF!  Jim's your Uncle. smiley

 

From my reading the bootloader is LUFA with a twist, so no problems there.  I'll put something in Deans basket as thanks.

 

My only part of this gig was to design the PCBoard and lower the parts count.  This does the trick.

 

 

Thanks all.

JIm

 

 

I would rather attempt something great and fail, than attempt nothing and succeed - Fortune Cookie

 

"The critical shortage here is not stuff, but time." - Johan Ekdahl

 

"Step N is required before you can do step N+1!" - ka7ehk

 

"If you want a career with a known path - become an undertaker. Dead people don't sue!" - Kartman

"Why is there a "Highway to Hell" and only a "Stairway to Heaven"? A prediction of the expected traffic load?"  - Lee "theusch"

 

Speak sweetly. It makes your words easier to digest when at a later date you have to eat them ;-)  - Source Unknown

Please Read: Code-of-Conduct

Atmel Studio6.2/AS7, DipTrace, Quartus, MPLAB, RSLogix user