FPGA Pinout

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hi all i really mixed up in fpga pins, i dont know which one is 1 and which is 2, i want to design PCB of 84 and 44 pin (not smd)

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Well, there ought to be a diagram in the spec sheet.

If its DIP, it will be at one of two corners. Usually, there is an index mark.

Jim

Jim Wagner Oregon Research Electronics, Consulting Div. Tangent, OR, USA http://www.orelectronics.net

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i think it is plcc and problem is with plcc through-hole socket :)
measure, or find plcc-socket in your pcb editor
if this is eagle - should be defined
if its protel - i think i should have this... somewhere...

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maybe giving us a part number would help?

Go electric!
Happy electric car owner / builder

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PLCC-44

Attachment(s): 

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This is really confusing. PLCC-44 is just a package. It's like asking for the pinout of a DIL-22. Makes no sense whatsoever.

"Pinout" usually refers to what signals is on which pins of the package, and in order to talk about that the device must also be known. So what are we talking about. An AVR? If so which AVR, if not then what?

Anyhow, knowing the device then the pinout should be readily available, usually in the data sheet for the device.

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"Some questions have no answers."[C Baird] "There comes a point where the spoon-feeding has to stop and the independent thinking has to start." [C Lawson] "There are always ways to disagree, without being disagreeable."[E Weddington] "Words represent concepts. Use the wrong words, communicate the wrong concept." [J Morin] "Persistence only goes so far if you set yourself up for failure." [Kartman]

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Pin 1 is usually marked with an index of some sort. Pins are numbered counter-clockwise from the index, usually.

On PLCC packages, the index is usually a small indentation in one corner or that corner not "pointed" (ie, beveled). Pin 1 is the first pin counter clockwise from the corner. Pin 2 is the next one, counter clockwise, from pin 1.

Jim

Jim Wagner Oregon Research Electronics, Consulting Div. Tangent, OR, USA http://www.orelectronics.net

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PLCC FPGAs like the Altera Flex 10K have pin 1 in the middle of one side.

Leon

Leon Heller G1HSM

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Oh, great! Then you HAVE to read a real data sheet. There WILL be a picture/diagram of the pin numbering. Somewhere.

Jim

Jim Wagner Oregon Research Electronics, Consulting Div. Tangent, OR, USA http://www.orelectronics.net

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have any of you seen plcc-44 through-hole socket?
or you just too proud/stubborn to acknowledge that pin numbering in that socket can be tricky

jim: i've never seen plcc package that would have pin #1 on any of its corners
maybe i'm just not old enought

fortunatly zauberer did provide right answer

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wow candle you should lay off the caffeine for a while! Relax. I don't know of any package where the pin numbering is "tricky". If the original poster would just tell us the manufacturer's part number of the particular part he or she is talking about we could solve this problem in one post. For some reason he is being cagey about what part he is using. Knowing that it is a PLCC 44 is not helpful.

Go electric!
Happy electric car owner / builder

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i'm pretty relaxed, just it makes me wonder noone seems to get what the author of orginal message wanted to say
so it might seems that knowing that it is a plccc-44 is not enought, but when you combine it with author's desire of making pcb for plcc-44 chip not being smd (for the recall - plcc is smd device) one should conclude what author really is asking for

i don't know if majority of forum's users are english-speaking, but i would rather assume this is not true
i'm certainly not, just getting around, trying to understand what everyone else is trying to express
and this is what i expect from anyone else
if this is too much, guess i have too high expectations then

anyways - i didn't want to be rude, just have low tolerance for certain things

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Quote:

have any of you seen plcc-44 through-hole socket?

Yes. I have. And I would expect many other have too.

You haven't? Here's one example: http://parts.digikey.com/1/parts... (image at bottom of page).

As of January 15, 2018, Site fix-up work has begun! Now do your part and report any bugs or deficiencies here

No guarantees, but if we don't report problems they won't get much of  a chance to be fixed! Details/discussions at link given just above.

 

"Some questions have no answers."[C Baird] "There comes a point where the spoon-feeding has to stop and the independent thinking has to start." [C Lawson] "There are always ways to disagree, without being disagreeable."[E Weddington] "Words represent concepts. Use the wrong words, communicate the wrong concept." [J Morin] "Persistence only goes so far if you set yourself up for failure." [Kartman]

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I've actually used them with FPGAs and MCUs.

Leon

Leon Heller G1HSM

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Re-reading your post:

Quote:

for the recall - plcc is smd device

...or socketed.

As of January 15, 2018, Site fix-up work has begun! Now do your part and report any bugs or deficiencies here

No guarantees, but if we don't report problems they won't get much of  a chance to be fixed! Details/discussions at link given just above.

 

"Some questions have no answers."[C Baird] "There comes a point where the spoon-feeding has to stop and the independent thinking has to start." [C Lawson] "There are always ways to disagree, without being disagreeable."[E Weddington] "Words represent concepts. Use the wrong words, communicate the wrong concept." [J Morin] "Persistence only goes so far if you set yourself up for failure." [Kartman]

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I've actually used them with FPGAs (84-pin) and MCUs.

Leon

Leon Heller G1HSM

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Yes, the PLCC socket in through-hole is tricky. But, it only takes a continuity checker to verify which pin goes where. Been there, done that.

As for PLCC pin1 at corner, you are correct. Bevel corner does not (usually) match pin 1 which is (usually) in the middle of one side. I stand corrected. But, the pin numbering DOES go counter-clockwise from pin 1 and you CAN tell which through-hole socket pin goes with which device pin.

Jim

Jim Wagner Oregon Research Electronics, Consulting Div. Tangent, OR, USA http://www.orelectronics.net

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hmdtop wrote:
hi all i really mixed up in fpga pins, i dont know which one is 1 and which is 2, i want to design PCB of 84 and 44 pin (not smd)

Sigh...I will make my comment one last time....

The original poster never said anything about PLCCs or sockets or anything of the sort. All we know for sure is FPGA, 84, and 44 pins. EVERYTHING ELSE IS SPECULATION! I will agree that it is PROBABLY a PLCC given the pin count but WE DON'T KNOW.

The manufacturer's part number of the FPGA in question is the FIRST place to start.

Go electric!
Happy electric car owner / builder