Fill Me In: Is Atmel a dead horse?

Go To Last Post
38 posts / 0 new
Author
Message
#1
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

Hi,

 

im a complete begginer, i know nothing, but want to learn.

 

Arduino was easy enough for me to kick start in the micro controller world.

 

whats the Next step?

 

ive seen that Atmel was purchased by competitors: Microchip PIC.

and seems to me looking the Microschip website, that they want to kill Atmel...

the Studio7 software is hidden somewhere..

 

the STK600 kit was discontinued... accesory boards are Not clear path..

 

its all weird to me...

Arduino = Easy

STK600 / Studio7 = crazy complex, abandonware.

 

for example:

Studio7 STK600 does Not seem to have examples like Arduino built-it, correct me if im wrong.

 

i want use a Mega8515L PLCC32

but... its imposible to know what type of routing card and adapter board do i need for STK600.

seems that i dont need boards, just ISP wires from STK600 to PLCC32 socket.

but that guess was after searching days on internet..

Not an easy guess, like with a TL866ii programmer its very easy.

 

all i want is to learn enough,

so i can translate a software/circuit made for PIC to Atmel,

and test both circuits to see what "feels better" to me.

 

PICKIT 4 is cheaper, easy, has some problems with older chips, needs a 100ohm resistor in pin1 or bricks some ICs "because its too fast for older IC".

PICKIt 3 is even cheaper, but way slower.

 

there is a video on youtube that shows MPLAB SW for PICKIT 3 that can be used with an Atmel Dragon or something, is recognized as PICKIT 3 form EEVBLOG.

 

there are too much holes in my knowledge...

like Swiss Cheese, holes everywhere,,,

 

seems to me that with Atmel i need to learn history, instead of learning how to program...

 

Is Arduino a trap? learning something that cannot advance?

 

Is Atmel a Dead Horse.?

are Atmel chips programable with PICKIT 4 ? = purchasing STK600 is a waste of money..

 

seems that at some point in time the merge micro+atmel was going well...
but suddently Bang Atmel is gone, PIC or Nothing. Use Atmel at your own risk.

 

 

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

Is Arduino a trap? learning something that cannot advance?

Possibly a trap, but not all traps are bad!  Regardless of the area of knowledge, there is always more to learn, more to do, even in the Arduino world.  The entire field keeps progressing. But there are other parts of micro world to explore as well--you only trap yourself when you quit exploring. 

Remember, the Arduino is a product (a development/application learning platform for beginners) that uses the Atmel chip(s).  As things have progressed, what was once "beginner" becomes more sophisticated.  Power windows used to be one mark of a luxury automobile.  

Many different products use Atmel chips!  Use atmel or use something else ? Do what you enjoy, so you enjoy what you do.

 

 

When in the dark remember-the future looks brighter than ever.   I look forward to being able to predict the future!

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

Why do you want to use the 8515? It is what most of us consider to be an old chip and not for new designs. If you choose a more modern chip then you will find plenty of options for hardware and software.

In fact, why do you want to change from the 328 as used on the Arduino?

#1 Hardware Problem? https://www.avrfreaks.net/forum/...

#2 Hardware Problem? Read AVR042.

#3 All grounds are not created equal

#4 Have you proved your chip is running at xxMHz?

#5 "If you think you need floating point to solve the problem then you don't understand the problem. If you really do need floating point then you have a problem you do not understand."

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

JuanPC2020 wrote:

Is Atmel a Dead Horse.?

No, merely the brand name has swallowed into Microchip.

Look at recent part family releases based on Atmel cores.

 

JuanPC2020 wrote:

i want use a Mega8515L PLCC32

 

hehe, and you are asking/worried  about dead horse ? 

PLCC32 is an ancient package, and PLCC are only used for existing mature designs, for new designs.  

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

In my opinion AVR architecture is superior to PIC, others will likely agree. It executes instructions in less cycles, develop tool are free, ect. Microchip bought AVR (Atmel) for a reason, it's market share was substantial and AVR was kicking butt. That being said, I feel you will enjoy AVR more than PIC. Simply because I do. Microchip is still releasing new AVR, the new Mega0 and TinyAvr1 series is much improved over old series. So infact they are still actively developing AVR products. Another recommendation, work on some lower level stuff other than adruino, learn some assembly, write your own classes, write your own bootloader, ect. Adruino makes it easy to start but can become a crutch; As far as it being a trap.. I consider it a hobby learning tool, like old basic stamps, something to get you started, ideally those who dig deeper or move from hobby to career will migrate to lower level coding and ditch the Adruino in favor of more optimized designs targeting a specific a product (after all, an Adruino is just an Avr on a breakout board with support classes someone else wrote). I've been programming AVR since their first chip was introduced, back then their was no "development boards" you just bought some chips and breadboarded up some test circuits and wrote code (no support classes, you wrote all of it). I still feel like that is a good learning experience way of doing things.

Last Edited: Fri. Oct 30, 2020 - 07:05 AM
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 1

Just about anything is better than PIC architecture. PIC was born to be cheap n cheerful with 70’s technology. Nevertheless, that didn’t seem to stunt its adoption. Microchip grew bigger than Atmel.
It’s interesting that Arduino isn’t considered bare metal. Its no less bare metal than what you'd write yourself. Personally, the challenge is writing code to solve the problem rather than worrying about writing a i2c driver or whatnot.

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

JuanPC2020 wrote:
Atmel was purchased by competitors: Microchip PIC

Microchip is much more than just PIC!

 

Just in terms of microcontrollers, they now have PIC, AVR, 8051, and ARM - plus FPGAs.

and maybe some I've missed?

 

And, beyond that, Microchip is a lot more than just microcontrollers.

 

JuanPC2020 wrote:
the STK600 kit was discontinued... accesory boards are Not clear path

AIUI, they were on the way out before the acquisition. They never supported the SAM range.

 

The way forward (from before the acquisition) was the XPlained boards which give you a small, low-cost board - complete with full debugger - rather than a big, expensive platform like STK.

The XPlained boards do come with examples - they are recognised by Atmel Studio when you plug them in, and it will present you with the list of specific examples for that board.

 

https://www.avrfreaks.net/commen...

https://www.avrfreaks.net/commen...

 

JuanPC2020 wrote:
seems to me that with Atmel i need to learn history

JuanPC2020 wrote:
i want use a Mega8515L PLCC32

Now that really is a history lesson!

 

JuanPC2020 wrote:
Is Arduino a trap?

Being entirely open-source - both hardware and software - I don't really see how it can be called a trap?

 

JuanPC2020 wrote:
something that cannot advance?

You can get a long way with Arduino!

 

You are not limited to just using the Arduino framework and IDE to create code for Arduino hardware; eg,

 

https://www.element14.com/commun...

 

You can import Arduino "sketches" into Atmel Studio, and work on them as "normal" C++ projects:

 

https://www.avrfreaks.net/forum/...

 

In conclusion, although Atmel no longer exists as a separate entity, its microcontroller lines continue to be available, supported, and developed.

Top Tips:

  1. How to properly post source code - see: https://www.avrfreaks.net/comment... - also how to properly include images/pictures
  2. "Garbage" characters on a serial terminal are (almost?) invariably due to wrong baud rate - see: https://learn.sparkfun.com/tutorials/serial-communication
  3. Wrong baud rate is usually due to not running at the speed you thought; check by blinking a LED to see if you get the speed you expected
  4. Difference between a crystal, and a crystal oscillatorhttps://www.avrfreaks.net/comment...
  5. When your question is resolved, mark the solution: https://www.avrfreaks.net/comment...
  6. Beginner's "Getting Started" tips: https://www.avrfreaks.net/comment...
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

12oclocker wrote:
Microchip bought AVR (Atmel)

I think it's more likely that Microchip bought Atmel for their ARM licences - as Microchip previously stuck out like a sore thumb being one of the very few chip makers that didn't have any ARM product.

 

IIRC, there were many worried voices here that Microchip would dump AVR - leaving only PIC and SAM.

 

Clearly, that has not happened.

 

 

Top Tips:

  1. How to properly post source code - see: https://www.avrfreaks.net/comment... - also how to properly include images/pictures
  2. "Garbage" characters on a serial terminal are (almost?) invariably due to wrong baud rate - see: https://learn.sparkfun.com/tutorials/serial-communication
  3. Wrong baud rate is usually due to not running at the speed you thought; check by blinking a LED to see if you get the speed you expected
  4. Difference between a crystal, and a crystal oscillatorhttps://www.avrfreaks.net/comment...
  5. When your question is resolved, mark the solution: https://www.avrfreaks.net/comment...
  6. Beginner's "Getting Started" tips: https://www.avrfreaks.net/comment...
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 1

JuanPC2020 wrote:

Is Arduino a trap? learning something that cannot advance?

 

Is Atmel a Dead Horse.?

are Atmel chips programable with PICKIT 4 ? = purchasing STK600 is a waste of money..

Boy did you ever get the wrong end of the stick? As far as I can see Microchip are now releasing new models of AVR at a faster rate than Atmel ever did. The future looks very rosy indeed.

 

Also as I posted in another thread, I used a 10 year old Dragon and a 15 year old STK500 just the other day so it's not like these things suddenly lose viability because Atmel move on to develop other things.

 

Back in the day perhaps the classic "entry level" AVR development board that everyone bought one of for all kinds of job was the Atmel Butterfly (mega169 CPU), those who got heavily into AVR work would splash for an STK500 - this allows you to prototype ideas using all different kinds of AVR MCU. The STK600 appeared as an upgrade/replacement but, to be honest, it was too expensive for what it delivered and never caught on as much as things like Butterly and STK500 had. As a kind of "cut down STK500 with a debugger" the Dragon appeared. For a while people were plugging all kinds of chips into Dragons or using them to connect to homebrew. But then the landscape changed because of Arduino. It caught on in a big way and allowed anyone with an idea they wanted to prototype to get a well made board for a cheap price (esp when the Far East noticed the trend and started to make the unbelievably cheap clones). So there was no longer such a need for generic dev boards from Atmel themselves (like Butterfly, STK's Dragon etc). The range of Arduino grew so you could get big ones, small ones, and ones with a variety of different AVR (then later ARM) on them. Atmel got on board and started to produce "Xplained" boards which were a similar idea to Arduino but Atmel had the slight advantage that they could put their proprietary debugger designs onto their own cards (though they'd never catch on without having the same pinout as true Arduino as they could not carry all the various "shields"). Some later ones had Arduino like pinouts. In the Xplained Pro and Xplained Mini boards they delivered a number of different AVRs in prototype ready form. At this stage there was not much point in things like STK500, STK600 as you just bought the right (cheap) board for a job - either an Arduino or an Explained Pro/Mini. Even more recently they have being creating "Curiosity" boards (and interesting interplay between the names "Explained" (sometimes they weren't very well!) and "Curiousity" (which basically means - work it out yourself! (too cynical??)).

 

Of course after prototyping on Arduinos, (also Teensy), Xplained, Curiosity and so on there's a chance you want to lay down your own design either on breadboard or even fabricate a PCB and if you want to be able to program/debug it then if the debugger already on your Xplained/Curiosity cannot be employed for this you may need a separate device like a Snap, Atmle-ICE or similar - so Microchip(/Atmel) have offerings for this need too.

 

To have been able to analyze all this and suggest it is "dying" is a rather bizarre way to interpret what is actually looking at least as healthy as it ever has.

 

(then, of course, there's ARM too!)

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 1

Arduino has democratized micro programming. Ignore those who sneer at it. I've been writing firmware for over 40 years, but these days I gravitate towards Arduino solutions. Cheaper, zero lead time, good chance someone else has written something helpful. And the beauty of it is thst you don't have to use any of the Arduino code if you don't want to. You can just use the bootloader, or even ditch that too.
I wish there had been something like it 40 years ago.

Four legs good, two legs bad, three legs stable.

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

awneil wrote:
I think it's more likely that Microchip bought Atmel for their ARM licences - as Microchip previously stuck out like a sore thumb being one of the very few chip makers that didn't have any ARM product.

 

Microchip had ARM licences before the acquisition of Atmel. Besides, it not like ARM licenses are hard to obtain - they're not picky. If I were sufficiently funded I could get an ARM license or at least go via a foundry that would sub-license.

 

A similar excuse was touted with the proposed AMD acquisition of Xilinx. AMD has had ARM licenses for years.

 

Microchip probably had too much cash, so acquisitions are a good way of 'banking' the cash. Buy a company that has reasonable returns and then put your management in there to trim the fat and streamline the process. GE has been doing this for years.

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

Kartman wrote:
Microchip had ARM licences before the acquisition of Atmel.

I wasn't aware of that - they certainly weren't well known for it.

 

it not like ARM licenses are hard to obtain - they're not picky

Indeed. I suspect the hard part is not getting the licence, but turning it into a successful product line.

I gather that Atmel had a bit of a bumpy ride with that when they started out on the ARM road (with ARM7/9).

 

Microchip probably had too much cash, so acquisitions are a good way of 'banking' the cash.

Indeed - I'm sure these things are driven by accountants, not engineers!

 

Top Tips:

  1. How to properly post source code - see: https://www.avrfreaks.net/comment... - also how to properly include images/pictures
  2. "Garbage" characters on a serial terminal are (almost?) invariably due to wrong baud rate - see: https://learn.sparkfun.com/tutorials/serial-communication
  3. Wrong baud rate is usually due to not running at the speed you thought; check by blinking a LED to see if you get the speed you expected
  4. Difference between a crystal, and a crystal oscillatorhttps://www.avrfreaks.net/comment...
  5. When your question is resolved, mark the solution: https://www.avrfreaks.net/comment...
  6. Beginner's "Getting Started" tips: https://www.avrfreaks.net/comment...
Last Edited: Fri. Oct 30, 2020 - 11:09 AM
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0


JuanPC2020 wrote:
the Studio7 software is hidden somewhere

Seriously?

 

It's right there as the very first hit when I google it:

 

 

 

Although it is fairly obvious that no company would want to continue maintaining two entirely separate IDEs - so I guess MPLab is going to be the future.

 

But, for now, Atmel Studio is certainly not abandonware; it is still being maintained - eg, see:

 

https://www.avrfreaks.net/commen... - only yesterday.

 

Top Tips:

  1. How to properly post source code - see: https://www.avrfreaks.net/comment... - also how to properly include images/pictures
  2. "Garbage" characters on a serial terminal are (almost?) invariably due to wrong baud rate - see: https://learn.sparkfun.com/tutorials/serial-communication
  3. Wrong baud rate is usually due to not running at the speed you thought; check by blinking a LED to see if you get the speed you expected
  4. Difference between a crystal, and a crystal oscillatorhttps://www.avrfreaks.net/comment...
  5. When your question is resolved, mark the solution: https://www.avrfreaks.net/comment...
  6. Beginner's "Getting Started" tips: https://www.avrfreaks.net/comment...
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

glad to read that Studio 7 is still worked on, though with low prio.

Have a new work laptop and decided to look for a latest release of AS7 and found it was from October last year.

 

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 1


meslomp wrote:
decided to look for a latest release of AS7 and found it was from October last year.
yes but the "packs" won't be! (updates tend to come by packs - not a complete rebuild of AS7 now - which is kind of the whole reason they invented packs in the first place!)...

 

Last Edited: Fri. Oct 30, 2020 - 12:23 PM
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0


JuanPC2020 wrote:
i want use a Mega8515L

Despite, as others have said, that being a very old chip - it is still there:

 

Top Tips:

  1. How to properly post source code - see: https://www.avrfreaks.net/comment... - also how to properly include images/pictures
  2. "Garbage" characters on a serial terminal are (almost?) invariably due to wrong baud rate - see: https://learn.sparkfun.com/tutorials/serial-communication
  3. Wrong baud rate is usually due to not running at the speed you thought; check by blinking a LED to see if you get the speed you expected
  4. Difference between a crystal, and a crystal oscillatorhttps://www.avrfreaks.net/comment...
  5. When your question is resolved, mark the solution: https://www.avrfreaks.net/comment...
  6. Beginner's "Getting Started" tips: https://www.avrfreaks.net/comment...
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

Welcome to AVRFreaks!

 

You will find a very active group here and lots of resources (tutorial forum) to learn from!

 

Jim

 

FF = PI > S.E.T

 

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

Welcome!

JuanPC2020 wrote:
and seems to me looking the Microschip website, that they want to kill Atmel...

the Studio7 software is hidden somewhere..

Atmel is being re-branded, as one does with livestock, and one searches for Atmel Studio.

JuanPC2020 wrote:
the STK600 kit was discontinued...
What has EOL'd are STK500 plug-ins.

JuanPC2020 wrote:
STK600 / Studio7 = crazy complex, abandonware
Atmel Studio 7 must pass on though will have some more life.

Microsoft Visual Studio Isolated Shell 2015 is the last and EOLs in '25.

Hope the ones at Microchip create a Microchip extension to Visual Studio as Visual Studio

  • is popular (fairly complete zero price instance)
  • has an ecosystem (linters, debugger protocols, etc)
  • differentiates from the competition

Likewise with Visual Studio Code.

JuanPC2020 wrote:
i want use a Mega8515L PLCC32

but... its imposible to know what type of routing card and adapter board do i need for STK600.

seems that i dont need boards, just ISP wires from STK600 to PLCC32 socket.

but that guess was after searching days on internet..

DIP, QFP, QFN

JuanPC2020 wrote:
Is Atmel a Dead Horse.?
No, that's in San Angelo wink

In a way, horses live on by mares and sires.

JuanPC2020 wrote:
are Atmel chips programable with PICKIT 4 ?
Some

 


Atmel Studio 7 | Microchip Technology

 

Product Change Notification | Microchip Technology (Notification, enter ATSTK)

 

MPLAB Snap and atbackend | AVR Freaks

Visual Studio Isolated Shell - Visual Studio

Support for older versions of Visual Studio | Visual Studio Product Lifecycle and Servicing | Microsoft Docs

 

Device Support | STK600 AVR® Flash MCU Starter Kit User's Guide

 

The Deadhorse

Grandson of Secretariat, JD blows out his birthday candles! - YouTube (26s)

 

Device Support | MPLAB X IDE v5.40

 

edit :

Chocolatey Software | Atmel Studio 7.0.2397

 

"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

Last Edited: Fri. Oct 30, 2020 - 01:58 PM
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

12oclocker wrote:
In my opinion AVR architecture is superior to PIC, others will likely agree.
Depends on the problem spaces of engineering, accounting, and executive actions.

Bounds :

  • compute
  • memory
  • I/O
  • power

Accounts :

  • payable
  • receivable

Risk :

  • Planned
  • Reduction
  • Actualized
  • Mitigation

Cost is price plus (NRE, ecosystem, supply vs demand (wafer fabs, package and test), obsolescence, ...)

12oclocker wrote:
Microchip is still releasing new AVR, ...
and PIC

12oclocker wrote:
... the new Mega0 and TinyAvr1 series is much improved over old series.
plus AVR DA, AVR DB, and such though compute performance improvement is somewhat subtle.

 


Our Practice on Product Longevity | Microchip Technology

 

https://www.microchip.com/RSS/recent-8bitPIC.xml

 

megaAVR 0-series | AVR Freaks

ATtiny417 / ATtiny814 / ATtiny816 / ATtiny817 | AVR Freaks

What are the AVR28DA128 AVR32DA128 AVR48DA128 AVR64DA128 ?? | AVR Freaks

AVR® Instruction Set Manual (AVRxt is the most recent)

 

"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

I've been relatively pleased with the continued development of AVR products since Microchip acquired Atmel.
(I don't know if they broke any NDA promises to anyone...)

 

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

Reguarding Atmel Studio 7, you dont actually need it, you can use any IDE and write your own makefikes or compile scripts, debugging is a bit more involved using a command line debugger, but a good learning experience. I switched to Linux some time ago for AVR development, and prefer it over windows.

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

12oclocker wrote:
Reguarding Atmel Studio 7, you dont actually need it, you can use any IDE

Indeed. And you will find that Atmel Studio is not significantly (if at all)  more or less complicated than any other IDE.

 

write your own makefiles or compile scripts

might help you appreciate all that the IDE is actually doing for you ... ?

 

Top Tips:

  1. How to properly post source code - see: https://www.avrfreaks.net/comment... - also how to properly include images/pictures
  2. "Garbage" characters on a serial terminal are (almost?) invariably due to wrong baud rate - see: https://learn.sparkfun.com/tutorials/serial-communication
  3. Wrong baud rate is usually due to not running at the speed you thought; check by blinking a LED to see if you get the speed you expected
  4. Difference between a crystal, and a crystal oscillatorhttps://www.avrfreaks.net/comment...
  5. When your question is resolved, mark the solution: https://www.avrfreaks.net/comment...
  6. Beginner's "Getting Started" tips: https://www.avrfreaks.net/comment...
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 1

Yeah but the one thing that AS7 delivers that no other IDE does is the simulator. It's worth the entrance fee for that alone.

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

clawson wrote:

meslomp wrote:
decided to look for a latest release of AS7 and found it was from October last year.
yes but the "packs" won't be! (updates tend to come by packs - not a complete rebuild of AS7 now - which is kind of the whole reason they invented packs in the first place!)...

A, I did not know that.

I can imagine people looking as AS7 and thinking that it is no longer maintained.

But invisible to the guy looking for an installer the product is kept up to date.

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

I can imagine people looking as AS7 and thinking that it is no longer maintained.

Also, a significant part of AS7 is Microsoft Visual Studio, and some of that gets updated by Windows updates.

 

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

So, lets summarize for the OP:

 

1) AVR hardware development is NOT dead. Tiny0/1 and AVR0 and siblings are examples of recent releases of new hardware using the AVR 8/16 bit architecture. To many of us, these represent pretty significant improvements.

 

2) AVR software development is NOT dead. Many AVRs are now supported by Microchip MPLAB. While Atmel Studio 7 would appear to be stagnant, the Device Pack system allows incorporation of new devices without updating AS7 core. 

 

3) Development boards for new devices are being provided by Microchip AND third party sources. 

 

For me, any one of these points is sufficient evidence that we are not stuck on some sort of dead end. Of course, there is the forecast, now continuing for decades, that the 8-bit micro will see the end of its life. But, if that ever happens, the impact will be felt by many chip manufacturers, not  just AVRs. There is also the looming change in gcc, but that is at least a decade away and there is too much at stake to let that control things. Again, that effects not just AVR but also many other microcontroller families. 

 

Now, if we want to be pedantic about it, "Atmel" is dead because it no longer exists. That, however, is just a name change. The company and its resources continue to live with a new name.

 

So, to the original subject question: "Fill Me In: Is Atmel a dead horse?", I would answer: "No Way!"

 

Jim    

 

Until Black Lives Matter, we do not have "All Lives Matter"!

 

 

Last Edited: Mon. Nov 2, 2020 - 04:59 PM
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

ka7ehk wrote:
There is also the looming change in gcc, but that is at least a decade away and there is too much at stake to let that control things.
May you elaborate?

ka7ehk wrote:
The company ...
Atmel is dead.

ka7ehk wrote:
... and its resources continue to live with a new name.
Long live Atmel!

Am leery of lumping people into resources; don't know how many who were in, with, or at Atmel have stayed with Microchip (sweet offers?)

An Atmel wafer fab is still going.

Tempe Fab 2, Gresham Fab 4 | AVR Freaks

 

"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

ka7ehk wrote:

2) AVR software development is NOT dead. Many AVRs are now supported by Microchip MPLAB. While Atmel Studio 7 would appear to be stagnant, the Device Pack system allows incorporation of new devices without updating AS7 core. 

 

AS7.0 is stable and works pretty well.   It does not need frequent releases of the IDE.

 

MPLAB is not 100% for AVR and ARM debugging yet.   Expect regular releases.

One day the debugging etc will work as well as AS7.0

 

Both IDEs use a "Pack" system for describing the Target devices.    Similar to Keil and other ARM IDEs.

Established devices like ATmega328P should already have correct data in their Pack(s).

Brand new devices might need a new Pack.

 

David.

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

David -

 

I think this is  what was in my (increasingly faulty) memory cells: https://www.avrfreaks.net/forum/...

 

Jim

 

Until Black Lives Matter, we do not have "All Lives Matter"!

 

 

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

One great thing about Arduino is that you can download and install the compiler code for the latest 32-bit CPU module boards that are the next generation beyond the Atmel/Microchip ATmega328P that is the Arduino Nano/UNO.   Then, with a lot of internet research and experimentation, you can use standard (or slightly customized) Arduino code with these new processors.   For example the ESP32 incorporates WiFi, Internet access, and Bluetooth along with a  100+MHz, 32-bit, 1Meg flash ROM and sells for about $5 each on eBay.  It has a Arduino-capable bootloader built-in.

 

Another direction beyond Arduino is to explore the super-cheap, super small ATtiny10.   It sells for $0.30 cents (dollars, euros, pounds Sterling, about the same price) and has an ADC and timer internally.  There's only 1000 bytes of flash so anything more than LED blinking will be done using assembler language.  The assembler is the same as all the other Atmel AVR chips, so you can download code that does bit-banging of the I2C, SPI, and UART interfaces in AVR assembler and still have room for a tiny application. 

 

  In these times, the key to becoming a successful embedded programmer is not to master the CPU hardware, but instead to be able to quickly read and decipher other people's uploaded code to determine if it fits the needs of your application, and how much you will be needing to modify this code for your own use.

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

JuanPC2020 wrote:
Studio7 = ... abandonware

Not abandoned - latest updates: https://www.avrfreaks.net/forum/... !

Top Tips:

  1. How to properly post source code - see: https://www.avrfreaks.net/comment... - also how to properly include images/pictures
  2. "Garbage" characters on a serial terminal are (almost?) invariably due to wrong baud rate - see: https://learn.sparkfun.com/tutorials/serial-communication
  3. Wrong baud rate is usually due to not running at the speed you thought; check by blinking a LED to see if you get the speed you expected
  4. Difference between a crystal, and a crystal oscillatorhttps://www.avrfreaks.net/comment...
  5. When your question is resolved, mark the solution: https://www.avrfreaks.net/comment...
  6. Beginner's "Getting Started" tips: https://www.avrfreaks.net/comment...
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

gchapman wrote:
don't know how many who were in, with, or at Atmel have stayed with Microchip

I know several from Atmel still with Microchip ...

Top Tips:

  1. How to properly post source code - see: https://www.avrfreaks.net/comment... - also how to properly include images/pictures
  2. "Garbage" characters on a serial terminal are (almost?) invariably due to wrong baud rate - see: https://learn.sparkfun.com/tutorials/serial-communication
  3. Wrong baud rate is usually due to not running at the speed you thought; check by blinking a LED to see if you get the speed you expected
  4. Difference between a crystal, and a crystal oscillatorhttps://www.avrfreaks.net/comment...
  5. When your question is resolved, mark the solution: https://www.avrfreaks.net/comment...
  6. Beginner's "Getting Started" tips: https://www.avrfreaks.net/comment...
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

Seem Juan fired a few salvos then retreated.

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

or even just one shot ?

 

frown

Top Tips:

  1. How to properly post source code - see: https://www.avrfreaks.net/comment... - also how to properly include images/pictures
  2. "Garbage" characters on a serial terminal are (almost?) invariably due to wrong baud rate - see: https://learn.sparkfun.com/tutorials/serial-communication
  3. Wrong baud rate is usually due to not running at the speed you thought; check by blinking a LED to see if you get the speed you expected
  4. Difference between a crystal, and a crystal oscillatorhttps://www.avrfreaks.net/comment...
  5. When your question is resolved, mark the solution: https://www.avrfreaks.net/comment...
  6. Beginner's "Getting Started" tips: https://www.avrfreaks.net/comment...
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

Who-me wrote:

JuanPC2020 wrote:

i want use a Mega8515L PLCC32

 

hehe, and you are asking/worried  about dead horse ? 

 

Not so loudly! The 11 PDIP ones I have in tubes on the table might hear you and be insulted! laugh

Wayne

East London
South Africa

 

  • No, I am not an Electronics Engineer, just a 54 year old hobbyist/enthusiast
  • Yes, I am using Proteus to learn more about circuit design and electronics
  • No, I do not own a licensed copy of Proteus, I am evaluating it legitimately
  • No, I do not believe in software or intellectual property piracy or theft
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 1

WayneZA wrote:

Who-me wrote:

JuanPC2020 wrote:

i want use a Mega8515L PLCC32

 

hehe, and you are asking/worried  about dead horse ? 

 

Not so loudly! The 11 PDIP ones I have in tubes on the table might hear you and be insulted! laugh

That was way back in 2020......

Do not think we are going to hear anything more from the OP. 2 posts and never heard off again. Looks like a troll, so your dip chips will have had contact....