Efficiency in Amateur(1)

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Hai All

 

I'm trying to utilized the MC1496 IC dual balance modulator.At all of my document's and info's which I'd search in Internet.

Didn't found who used that chip in dual frecuencies or bands.

 

Found Aussie VK6FKB as the best circuit for modifications.Since the components for filter easy to find and cheap.

 

I'm used 2 MC1496 for 160m,80m,40 and 20 receivers.

 

Thank you.

 

Any inputs or suggestions are welcome and appreciate.

 

JSB

 

 

 

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Last Edited: Tue. Sep 10, 2019 - 01:29 PM
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Welcome to AVR Freaks -

 

This forum is primarily about the use and abuse of AVR microcontrollers. While there are a number of hams here, including me, we really are not set up to help with RF circuit questions. I have used the MC1496 (and several of its cousins).

 

But, somewhat more of a problem is that it is not clear what your question might be. "What do you think of ... " is not a very useful question. Do you have a problem with something that does not work? Are you unable to find parts? Are you unable to build it? Those things we might be able to help with, on the side. So, please ask a question that is a real question. And, it helps if it includes an AVR microcontroller!

 

Very best wishes

Jim

Jim Wagner Oregon Research Electronics, Consulting Div. Tangent, OR, USA http://www.orelectronics.net

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Are you the old Jeckson or a new one?

John Samperi

Ampertronics Pty. Ltd.

www.ampertronics.com.au

* Electronic Design * Custom Products * Contract Assembly

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AS they had Independence Day with World scenarios,Eaither did I

That makes no sense to an english speaker. 

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Thanks All

What I meant that no one built in dual at mc1496.
Are there cross or intrrference when used in dual band received?.

Thank's

.

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WOW! I havent seen one of those since my days at the Fiber Optics company.  We used them so send video signals over the glass.

 

That is a very old chip, but hey some things are timeless right? wink

 

What EXACTLY are you trying to do as this:

Jeckson wrote:
I'm used 2 MC1496 for 160m,80m,40 and 20 receivers.

 

Really does not make much sense to me....

 

East Coast Jim

I would rather attempt something great and fail, than attempt nothing and succeed - Fortune Cookie

 

"The critical shortage here is not stuff, but time." - Johan Ekdahl

 

"Step N is required before you can do step N+1!" - ka7ehk

 

"If you want a career with a known path - become an undertaker. Dead people don't sue!" - Kartman

"Why is there a "Highway to Hell" and only a "Stairway to Heaven"? A prediction of the expected traffic load?"  - Lee "theusch"

 

Speak sweetly. It makes your words easier to digest when at a later date you have to eat them ;-)  - Source Unknown

Please Read: Code-of-Conduct

Atmel Studio6.2/AS7, DipTrace, Quartus, MPLAB, RSLogix user

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MC1496 reminds me my old days.

 

[1] In the 80's, I used it to build an AM DSB-SC transmitter on MW band to take advantage of my simple DSB-SC demodulator (not approved officially till now!) which can recover the phase and frequency of the suppressed carrier while its frequency varies (about 6 Hz) in a relatively wide bandwidth (about 80 KHz). A conventional AM receiver outputted a noise-like audio signal when tuned at any frequency in the bandwidth of the transmitter (when activated by voice).

 

[2] I used the last MC1496 IC, I had, to build a power meter (real power of a load supplied by mains; 220V 50Hz). After a while, I blew it by mistake and I had no more chance to get it.

 

Cheers

 

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js wrote:

Are you the old Jeckson or a new one?

With 643 posts, what do you think John? cheeky

Ross McKenzie ValuSoft Melbourne Australia

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I would swear that when I responded, the "what ever you  call it" said that it was his first post.

 

Jeckson - unfortunately, your posts do to make much sense. Perhaps it is the way you are able write English? Try, instead, to write in your language and use one of the on-line translators to convert to English.

 

Jim

Jim Wagner Oregon Research Electronics, Consulting Div. Tangent, OR, USA http://www.orelectronics.net

Last Edited: Tue. Sep 10, 2019 - 03:14 PM
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what do you think John?

Exotic new lands, sun, beaches, adventures.....

John Samperi

Ampertronics Pty. Ltd.

www.ampertronics.com.au

* Electronic Design * Custom Products * Contract Assembly

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You must be departing very soon. Do you remember what I said after you announced your upcoming cruise?

Ross McKenzie ValuSoft Melbourne Australia

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Yes, but hopefully I won't be a "dearly departed" and no to the 2nd bit, can't remember if I had breakfast.......or what if I did have it....

John Samperi

Ampertronics Pty. Ltd.

www.ampertronics.com.au

* Electronic Design * Custom Products * Contract Assembly

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Emailed you.

Ross McKenzie ValuSoft Melbourne Australia

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Hai
Indeed Kerim,that old part.I built also at end of 80 and the begining 90.I could post you my old finished 455Khz modulator if dodn't stolen.
Since NE602 never arrived in my town.so back 1496 is suitable.
My plan used a pair for dual dc received which cpntain inside 1496.

Thank

JSB

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Last Edited: Fri. Sep 13, 2019 - 04:09 PM
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Jeckson wrote:
Since NE602 never arrived in my town

Gonna be a long wait as it was discontinued a while back along with the NE612

 

JIm

I would rather attempt something great and fail, than attempt nothing and succeed - Fortune Cookie

 

"The critical shortage here is not stuff, but time." - Johan Ekdahl

 

"Step N is required before you can do step N+1!" - ka7ehk

 

"If you want a career with a known path - become an undertaker. Dead people don't sue!" - Kartman

"Why is there a "Highway to Hell" and only a "Stairway to Heaven"? A prediction of the expected traffic load?"  - Lee "theusch"

 

Speak sweetly. It makes your words easier to digest when at a later date you have to eat them ;-)  - Source Unknown

Please Read: Code-of-Conduct

Atmel Studio6.2/AS7, DipTrace, Quartus, MPLAB, RSLogix user

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A great IC that LM1496N .  Probably made a half-dozen projects with it.  My article in Mar 1979 NZART Break-in magazine 

looks vaguely similar to singletodual.gif,  however a transceiver for CW work.

 

The unit still works.

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Thank's Davef

I'm used two antennas inputs and two oscillators and of course two outputs and filtered.
The problems were,no one used the capability of that two segment vircuit inside lm 1496.Did someone or documents perhaps someone already built it?

Thank you
JSB

.

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Jeckson,

 

I wonder if you are confused by the words "double" and "dual".  The LM1496 is a double-balanced mixer, which has a different meaning to operating on dual frequency (bands), ie 80 and 40meters.

 

Do mean that you switch between two antennas, two oscillators and two ouputs?

no one used the capability of that two segment vircuit inside lm 1496

I do not understand what "two segment circuit" means. 

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From Jeckson's posts above, it appears that he wants to build a receiver that simultaneously receives two signals on two different frequencies. So, it is really two receivers in one unit (each receiver being one of his "segments").

 

Jim

Jim Wagner Oregon Research Electronics, Consulting Div. Tangent, OR, USA http://www.orelectronics.net

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So,...uh... does this have something to do with some kind of radio?

 

For standard FM in the 88 to 106 MHz range, this RDA5807M chip works wonders on a 32768 Hz watch crystal.  And it costs $0.50 in US dollars.  Here'a a link:https://www.ebay.com/itm/5pcs-FM...

 

It MIGHT be possible to put a 5 to 10 KHz signal onto the pins that have the 32.768KHz crystal and use the IC as a radio receiver in the 20-80 meter band range.  But it's an FM receiver, and perhaps the signals that you are working with are AM.

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Wow--an actual schematic that looks like a schematic.  Strange--now that we have CAD tools to make drawing thing like this easy, we don't bother to do it; instead just sprinkling parts randomly around in an incoherent fashion. 

Maybe when you grunted for hours through old paper methods, you expected the results of your labors to be decent.

The parts list reminds me when 5% resistors were typical & 1% was considered a "luxury" item at a high cost.  

When in the dark remember-the future looks brighter than ever.   I look forward to being able to predict the future!

Last Edited: Sun. Sep 15, 2019 - 04:19 PM
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Hello, Jeckson -

 

A bit of advice, please. You will have MUCH better success if you DO NOT try to use the same IC to handle the two signals, even if the IC is a "dual" mixer. The reason? it  is VERY hard to keep the two signals and their local oscillators separate, even with a good etched circuit board. If you try to make something by hand, then it is VERY much more difficult. 

 

<edit> The IC you have picked is a "double-balanced mixer". The emphasis is on "double-balanced" and this does NOT mean "double mixer". It means that it is balanced (that is, differential) for both the signal input and the oscillator input. There is ONLY one mixer in each IC. </edit>

 

And, it is VERY VERY difficult to do proper mixing of both signals in a single mixer. Maybe not impossible. But VERY hard. If this is your idea, I personally would not try without very advanced instruments (oscilloscope and spectrum analyzer, at a minimum). 

 

You can probably use a single antenna. But have the signal from the antenna go through a separate band-pass filter for each signal. In other words, split it into two parallel paths right at the antenna connection. From that point on, treat it  as two separate and independent receivers. 

 

You have not said what you want to do with the audio from the two signals. This might be a bit of a challenge also, depending on what you want to do. 

 

Best wishes

Jim

 

ps to other folks... I had some dealings with Jeckson a fair number of years ago. He lives in Philippines or Indonesia and has major problems obtaining even simple components (as he alluded to, above). As I recall, he has some technical training but, at that time, it was not very extensive or intensive. His English language skills are also pretty limited so he has a hard time describing what it is that he wants to do. When you combine this with a local language that does not even have technical terms, it can be difficult, but hang in there and make some effort to figure things out. - Jim

Jim Wagner Oregon Research Electronics, Consulting Div. Tangent, OR, USA http://www.orelectronics.net

Last Edited: Sun. Sep 15, 2019 - 10:49 PM