Don't you love when...

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#1
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...you breadboard project starts to look like this:

 

 

I'm sure you guys have probably done much bigger stuff but this is pretty complex for me! But trust me, there's a specific order to the wire colors so it's easy to follow.

My digital portfolio: www.jamisonjerving.com

My game company: www.polygonbyte.com

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You've got a long way to go before you give AtomicZombie a run for his money ;-)

 

Still, you're well on your way.  Nice!

"Experience is what enables you to recognise a mistake the second time you make it."

"Good judgement comes from experience.  Experience comes from bad judgement."

"Wisdom is always wont to arrive late, and to be a little approximate on first possession."

"When you hear hoofbeats, think horses, not unicorns."

"Fast.  Cheap.  Good.  Pick two."

"We see a lot of arses on handlebars around here." - [J Ekdahl]

 

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joeymorin wrote:

You've got a long way to go before you give AtomicZombie a run for his money ;-)

 

Still, you're well on your way.  Nice!

I'm not sure anyone can reach the God-level of AtomicZombie! Besides, I'm not sure I'd like the idea of wiring up over 200 logic ICs. Hehe

 

Thanks for the kind comments! I've learned so much from my fellow Freaks in the last almost three years in my endeavoring of electronics.

My digital portfolio: www.jamisonjerving.com

My game company: www.polygonbyte.com

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My video system is now pumping out a full 256x240 static image:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=...

 

Full 256 colors! The game image being output is just an image from Contra: Hard Corps. from the Sega Genesis. It may look like it's being cut off on the right side but it's actually not the hardware doing that. I had to crop the image in Photoshop before I export the data for the video hardware. The original image was 324x224.

 

Now the probably more difficult task is up... real time rendering of sprites! But then again... a year ago I thought generating a 256x240 image with 256 colors was an almost impossible task!

My digital portfolio: www.jamisonjerving.com

My game company: www.polygonbyte.com

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Just a small hint: if the green LED doesn't light up, it is NOT a software problem! ;-)

Einstein was right: "Two things are unlimited: the universe and the human stupidity. But i'm not quite sure about the former..."

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I have never trusted that kind of wiring.

I would use wire wrap it's way more stable, and less messy to look at :) 

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Or roadrunner. 

 

David

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That I only use to correct errors/add-on on first version of a PCB :) , never used it for a birds nest.  

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DO1THL wrote:

Just a small hint: if the green LED doesn't light up, it is NOT a software problem! ;-)

Hehe, when I took the photo I forgot I still had my debug LED on the board but it wasn't wired up. After I posted the photo here I realized it and thought "Someone will probably make a comment about that LED."

You didn't disappoint!

 

sparrow2 wrote:

I have never trusted that kind of wiring.

I would use wire wrap it's way more stable, and less messy to look at :) 

As in rolls of say 30 gauge? Like this: http://www.digikey.com/product-d...

I've got a couple rolls of this but I found it to be a pain to cut and strip almost 70 wires. It is significantly (very, very) cheaper than these male to male jumpers, so I do prefer it, especially if I've already got enough wires cut and stripped.

 

DAFlippers wrote:

Or roadrunner.

Is this just bare wire copper? DigiKey yielded no worthwhile results for "roadrunner." Google image results shows a few spindles that look like wire wrap, as sparrow mentioned. But some almost look like bare copper but I'm not sure.

My digital portfolio: www.jamisonjerving.com

My game company: www.polygonbyte.com

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David

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Ahh, okay. So it seems these would be used on a soldered perf/proto board? Definitely looks to be a useful tool to have on my bench (well... kitchen table).

My digital portfolio: www.jamisonjerving.com

My game company: www.polygonbyte.com

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You can use it on single pad or stripboard although the original boards, pins etc. make it easier.  I've used it for many years.

 

David

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DAFlippers wrote:

You can use it on single pad or stripboard although the original boards, pins etc. make it easier.  I've used it for many years.

 

David

Thanks for the tips, David!

My digital portfolio: www.jamisonjerving.com

My game company: www.polygonbyte.com

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Nice Breadboarded project!

 

Breadboards get slammed a lot, but it is my usual way to bring up a new project, unless doing a little surgery on an old project's spare PCB will do the trick.

 

I use mostly "telephone wire", with the ends stripped, (obviously), and a few of the pre-cut wires with male connectors, which, it turns out, are actually quite convenient.

 

I've not used wire-wrap for 30+ years, and I was never very good at it.

 

JC

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DocJC wrote:

Nice Breadboarded project!

 

Breadboards get slammed a lot, but it is my usual way to bring up a new project, unless doing a little surgery on an old project's spare PCB will do the trick.

 

I use mostly "telephone wire", with the ends stripped, (obviously), and a few of the pre-cut wires with male connectors, which, it turns out, are actually quite convenient.

 

I've not used wire-wrap for 30+ years, and I was never very good at it.

 

JC

 

Thanks, JC. Yeah, I've got an entire schematic and board designed in Eagle for this project but the breadboard was a quick way to verify the video generation and frame buffer (RAM) works as expected. The board design includes two separate 128Kb RAM chips along with a cartridge header for a system processor to push sprites to the back buffer. This breadboard only has the one RAM chip and single video processor. Eventually it will be a multitude of a video processor (ATmega1284), audio processor (most likely a smaller ATtiny device) and shift registers, shift registers for the controllers (in the case of my arcade cabinet, just a single controller, as in the face buttons and joystick), and then a cartridge slot/header for a host processor (most likely going to be a SAM G55 @ 120MHz). So it will be a mix of 8-bit and 32-bit processors. This is essentially the backbone of three different projects: An arcade cabinet, a handheld system with cartridge (ala GameBoy), and a full blown set-top arcade box with two controller support (ala Sega Genesis / NES).

 

Of course, each will utilize the components in different manners. The handheld would be slimmed way down and wouldn't use VGA but would pump data to a TFT screen. The arcade cabinet probably wouldn't use cartridges. Or if it does, it would be internal to the machine and couldn't be swapped by person playing the arcade cabinet.

 

[Edit] Parenthesis in wrong place

My digital portfolio: www.jamisonjerving.com

My game company: www.polygonbyte.com

Last Edited: Wed. Jun 22, 2016 - 07:01 PM