Does a plug and play SMD Transceiver IC exist?

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#1
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Hi, help me time again =( Here is my problem. Is there a cheap (10$ less) standalone IC which can transmit data through radio waves with minimal (better no) hardware and configuration requirements aside from power?

I have working code and hardware setup for use with a Atmega and a Transceiver IC chip (ADF-7020-1) which I've tested and works good. This IC required a lot of inductors, capacitors, resistors, codework, impedance matching networks and a whole bunch of my time to get to work right and when I had to solder one together, it took a million tries before I could get the whole thing to work. If only there were a transceiver out there that was as plug and play as an Aerocomm but as small as a dime, is there? Thanks everyone.

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Frequency band? Range? Data rate?

Leon Heller G1HSM

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Fair question, range needed is 5 feet, frequency can be anything (~800MHz or 2.4GHz), data rate at 9600 but could go up to 56k or as low as 1200. Size and then simplicity are the two main drivers. thanks

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Warning: Grumpy Old Chuff. Reading this post may severely damage your mental health.

Last Edited: Tue. Jan 24, 2012 - 07:15 PM
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I guess I was hoping that someone would know about a single IC which was plug and play, not a daughter board or demo board. I imagine this sort of thing doesn't exist. Admin can delete this thread.

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The modules I provided the links above do everything you can imagine and are ready to use. If you're trying to find a bare chip which does the same - good luck then :lol:

Warning: Grumpy Old Chuff. Reading this post may severely damage your mental health.

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Yes I was trying to find a bare chip, I'm still green into this. Thanks I didn't know they didn't exist.

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The Nordic Semi nRF24L01+ doesn't need many components.

Leon Heller G1HSM

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Well, this one needs only a few caps/inductors and a crystal. They also offer a ready made tiny PCB (12x16 mm) with this IC.

Warning: Grumpy Old Chuff. Reading this post may severely damage your mental health.

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The Atmel AT86RF212 does not need that many components either. And a complete and free ready-made software stack is available too.

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If you can port to atmega128rfa1 the 802.15.4 radio will be built-in.

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Right now I'm working on a project with some remote control looking at what another company did... Their system runs 433MHz and their PCB has the following:
1 8-pin IC from Microchip (probably a micro with RF)
4 buttons
2 transistors
1 crystal
1 LED
A handfull of SMD resistors and capacitors...

So yeah it can be done that simple! But I guess it wasn't that simple to calculate/figure out how to do. The board has PCB tracks that are spiralling to act as inductors.

- Brian

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The devil is in the details(c) :lol:

Warning: Grumpy Old Chuff. Reading this post may severely damage your mental health.

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Its probably not a crystal but a SAW device for 433MHz. The micro is probably a keyloq device that just gates the transmitter. There's probably an app note on BrandX's website. The 433 MHz stuff is all pretty standard - the receiver can vary substantially depending on what performance level is required. A high level of probability methinks.

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So many choices, so little knowledge. I'm in the same boat

If you don't know my whole story, keep your mouth shut.

If you know my whole story, you're an accomplice. Keep your mouth shut. 

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The simple fact is that IC processes cannot control frequency to the precision needed for even the crudest RF communication. This directly requires some kind of external frequency control, whether SAW or crystal. Its going to be one or the other.

The other problem area is transmitter output. Transistors just do not produce the impedance appropriate for a direct antenna connection. Sure, you can do it, but you end up with only 10-20% of the output power being delivered to the antenna . That suks. So, a couple of caps and an inductor, minimum.

Hardly "plug and play"!

Jim

 

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