Does Atmel permit the educational use of AStudio6?

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I intermittently present a class for highschool kids on microcontroller programming, which has involved a simple AVR-based class project. My co-instructor and I would like to transition from AStudio4 to AStudio6, but I became concerned while reading AStudio6's yards-long License Agreement over the question of whether it allows classroom use. That seems kind of odd, given the AVR's origins as a thesis project of a couple grad students, but it's the impression my non-legal mind gets from reading:

13.  General.
Licensee will not, and will have no right to, assign, delegate or otherwise transfer (whether voluntarily, by operation of law or otherwise) this Agreement or any of its rights or obligations hereunder to any third party
without the prior written consent of Atmel, and any purported assignment, delegation or other transfer without such consent will have no force or effect.

Does anyone here have experience with installing AStudio6 on multiple classroom workstation PCs?

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AS6 is free to whoever wants it, therefore there can't really be any restrictions as to where you choose to use it.

Regards,
Steve A.

The Board helps those that help themselves.

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That means you can't change the restrictions already imposed on by Atmel. The TL;DR of the agreement is that you can install it anywhere you like for free and use it, but you can't blame Atmel for any issues.

- Dean :twisted:

Make Atmel Studio better with my free extensions. Open source and feedback welcome!

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As Dean says,

just another note... Studio needs to be started as an admin the first time after it has been installed, as it installs some documentation etc from some pre-bundled extensions. You should automatically get a couple of UAC request on this first startup.

:: Morten

 

(yes, I work for Atmel, yes, I do this in my spare time, now stop sending PMs)

 

The postings on this site are my own and do not represent Microchip’s positions, strategies, or opinions.

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abcminiuser wrote:
That means you can't change the restrictions already imposed on by Atmel. The TL;DR of the agreement is that you can install it anywhere you like for free and use it, but you can't blame Atmel for any issues.

- Dean :twisted:

Well, actually you CAN blame Atmel, and we usually do. It just won't do you any good

If you don't know my whole story, keep your mouth shut.

If you know my whole story, you're an accomplice. Keep your mouth shut. 

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Thanks, everyone, for the replies. My pessimistic interpretation was that the only reason an individual can use AStudio for free is that the EULA permits them to. But if it says that the EULA's terms can't be extended to another individual, then wouldn't that mean the original downloader can't assure anyone else that THEY can use it for free (without getting/installing their own copy)? That was part of my worried reasoning, anyway.

But my local Atmel rep (thanks, Chris!) was kind enough to forward my question to someone in the relevant department of Atmel, and the verdict was, "go ahead and install on a set of classroom workstations". Whew!