Does Anybody Recognise This Switch?

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#1
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I've spent several hours trawling the web, both images searches and every suppliers I can think of.

 

It's a standard 6mm x 6mm tactile switch body with an extra actuator. The outer ring is stationary with an inner operating button.

 

Does anyone recognise it?

 

#1 This forum helps those that help themselves

#2 All grounds are not created equal

#3 How have you proved that your chip is running at xxMHz?

#4 "If you think you need floating point to solve the problem then you don't understand the problem. If you really do need floating point then you have a problem you do not understand." - Heater's ex-boss

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Not sure what you mean by "extra actuator". Could you elaborate? Are there really two switches?

 

Jim

Jim Wagner Oregon Research Electronics, Consulting Div. Tangent, OR, USA http://www.orelectronics.net

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I have a bunch of those in a drawer but without the button cap.

 

Based on the pins coming off the back, which look exactly like the ones i have check OMRON B3F series switches

 

Heres a link:

https://omronfs.omron.com/en_US/...

 

From there you should be able to find your animal

 

East Side Jim

I would rather attempt something great and fail, than attempt nothing and succeed - Fortune Cookie

 

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Atmel Studio6.2/AS7, DipTrace, Quartus, MPLAB user

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I didn't explain that very well did I?

 

I can find millions of tactile switches which will take a keycap...

The one I have though has a stationary outer ring and the keycap sits inside it. So the part arrowed in green is fixed, whilst the part arrowed in red is the moving keycap.

 

Mechanically, having that fixed outer ring has a lot going for it in my application.

 

#1 This forum helps those that help themselves

#2 All grounds are not created equal

#3 How have you proved that your chip is running at xxMHz?

#4 "If you think you need floating point to solve the problem then you don't understand the problem. If you really do need floating point then you have a problem you do not understand." - Heater's ex-boss

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Search digikey, that looks like a round spst illuminated panel mount pushbutton

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Kuch wrote:
Search digikey, that looks like a round spst illuminated panel mount pushbutton

It might look quite big in my photo but in real life it is only 10mm in diameter. It is a PCB mounting tact(ile) switch just 6mm square on the back.

#1 This forum helps those that help themselves

#2 All grounds are not created equal

#3 How have you proved that your chip is running at xxMHz?

#4 "If you think you need floating point to solve the problem then you don't understand the problem. If you really do need floating point then you have a problem you do not understand." - Heater's ex-boss

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When in the dark remember-the future looks brighter than ever.   I look forward to being able to predict the future!

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When in the dark remember-the future looks brighter than ever.   I look forward to being able to predict the future!

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Thanks, some of the Honyone stuff looks hopeful.

#1 This forum helps those that help themselves

#2 All grounds are not created equal

#3 How have you proved that your chip is running at xxMHz?

#4 "If you think you need floating point to solve the problem then you don't understand the problem. If you really do need floating point then you have a problem you do not understand." - Heater's ex-boss

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Looks like this one (Multicomp TS0B22):

 

https://uk.farnell.com/multicomp...

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ajc wrote:

Looks like this one (Multicomp TS0B22):

 

https://uk.farnell.com/multicomp...

 

Perfect, thankyou so much. I owe you a beer.

#1 This forum helps those that help themselves

#2 All grounds are not created equal

#3 How have you proved that your chip is running at xxMHz?

#4 "If you think you need floating point to solve the problem then you don't understand the problem. If you really do need floating point then you have a problem you do not understand." - Heater's ex-boss