Difference PIC 16F627 and PIC 16F84A [cross post μchip.com]

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#1
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Hello users,

I would like some help. I want to know the difference between PIC 16F627 and PIC 16F84A.

I only have basic knowledge about microcontrollers.

Would be hepful if someone can tell me the differences.

Last Edited: Sun. Dec 8, 2019 - 08:42 PM
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Quote:

I only have basic knowledge about microcontrollers.

Clearly if you thought those were AVR models and would be known to users of an AVR centric website!

Surely Microchip.com have support fora for PIC chips?

Maybe try here:

http://www.microchip.com/forums/...?

I was going to say specifically here:

http://www.microchip.com/forums/...

except that by a strange coincidence someone using exactly the same ID as you has asked exactly the same question there already. Amazing!

http://www.microchip.com/forums/...

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Yes it was me.

Just want more than one opinion.

I don't have much knowledge about it all, so would really appreciate it if someone can explain the differences to me :(

Sam.

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He didn't get any help on the Microchip forum, either. He's not actually designing anything, he just wants to know the differences. :D

Leon Heller G1HSM

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Does nobody know how to read a datasheet anymore? This really has nothing to do with existing knowlege fo microcontrollers. I would expect that you can find the difference pretty quickly by simply comparing the features of the 2 devices. If there is something specifically stated in the datasheet that you do not understand... then by all means ask that specific question. But PLEASE don't troll the web asking people to summerize a comparison of two devices when you cna quickly and easily do that yourself. [which is likely why nobody answered your question on the other forum]

Writing code is like having sex.... make one little mistake, and you're supporting it for life.

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Quote:
He didn't get any help on the Microchip forum, either.

Presumably the people there, like the people here are wondering "how difficult is it to download two datasheets and compare them?"

Using the parametric selector on the uChip site I can see

         627A      84A
price   $1.30     $3.11
flash     1K        1K
EEPROM   128        64
RAM      224        68
I/O       16        13
pins      20        20
max f     20MHz     20MHz
datasheet 2009      2004

The 84A seems to be inferior in almost every way and costs three times the price. Wonder why they still bother to make it?

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Quote:

The 84A seems to be inferior in almost every way and costs three times the price. Wonder why they still bother to make it?

The 16F84 was the first flash PIC IIRC, and it might be that it is deployed in very large numbers, used in many designs. And now just speculating: Even if they have the same number of pins, and might be pin-compatible, it might be that they are not "orthogonal internally" to such a degree that porting software from one to the other is a simple job. As I said - just speculating.

I'm sure Heller can clarify.

Maybe this situation is the explanation of Microchips favourable comparison with Atmel, revenue-wise. :wink:

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"Some questions have no answers."[C Baird] "There comes a point where the spoon-feeding has to stop and the independent thinking has to start." [C Lawson] "There are always ways to disagree, without being disagreeable."[E Weddington] "Words represent concepts. Use the wrong words, communicate the wrong concept." [J Morin] "Persistence only goes so far if you set yourself up for failure." [Kartman]

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Or maybe they made to many in their final run and have a pallet-full in a warehouse somewhere? If so I have to give them kudos for not discontinuing the part and putting them in a landfill so that it remains possible for folks with old small volume designs to keep getting it. Oh crap, I think I just complimented MicroChip! Somebody please speculate on a more nefarious reason than the one I'm blathering about.

Smiley

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Microchip is well-known for keeping devices in production, even if there are newer and better chips that are upwards-compatible with them. That said, the 16F84 and 16F627 can both be replaced by the 16F88; it's cheaper and has more memory and peripherals, as well as on-chip debug support.

The 16F84 was the first PIC I ever used. I was working for Racal at the time and used it to control a small network of co-sited military radios for some DF tests. It also sent a call-sign at the regulation intervals.

Atmel launched the AT90S1200 shortly afterwards and I used one of those for another piece of test equipment. I must have been one of the first people in the UK to use one.

Leon Heller G1HSM

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Quote:
I want to know the difference between PIC 16F627 and PIC 16F84A.
The main difference is that they have different part numbers, the rest is irrelevant.

John Samperi

Ampertronics Pty. Ltd.

www.ampertronics.com.au

* Electronic Design * Custom Products * Contract Assembly

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But doesn't anyone think it's a rip-off of their customers to still be charging $3.11 for a chip that could be replaced by a $1.30 or even cheaper (88?). On their website how hard would it be for the 84A page:

http://www.microchip.com/wwwprod...

to say something like "not recommended for new design, you'll get far better value for money if you use this ..."

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A local dealer here have these:

AT90S2313-10PI DIP20,       SEK 68.75
AVR ATtiny2313-20PU DIP-20, SEK 23.75

(thats about $3 for tiny2313 and $9 for a 90s2313) :shock:. But the at90s2313 isn't recommended for new designs.

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clawson wrote:
But doesn't anyone think it's a rip-off of their customers to still be charging $3.11 for a chip that could be replaced by a $1.30 or even cheaper (88?). On their website how hard would it be for the 84A page:

http://www.microchip.com/wwwprod...

to say something like "not recommended for new design, you'll get far better value for money if you use this ..."

I work in an industry (Rail Safety Equipment) where it's a requirement to support designs for 15+ years. Once equipment is certified, its costly to re-engineer.

Though Atmel micros are 'nicer' to work with than Microchips, long-term device support is a big factor.

You get to know the manufacturers that are not good on this matter - you know who you are Philips/NXP :evil:

-=mike=-

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The difference between 16F627 and 16F84A is 223.

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Quote:
I work in an industry (Rail Safety Equipment) where it's a requirement to support designs for 15+ years. Once equipment is certified, its costly to re-engineer.

Though Atmel micros are 'nicer' to work with than Microchips, long-term device support is a big factor.

You get to know the manufacturers that are not good on this matter - you know who you are Philips/NXP :evil:

-=mike=-

These long term issues is why the 8051 family, licensed to many of Intel's competitors, is still popular!!!

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Quote:

The difference between 16F627 and 16F84A is 223.

Strange. I get FFFDDD (assuming two's complement).

Then, OTOH, I am shit tired having just finished off a trip to Stockholm, 8 hrs of teaching Subversion, and on the train on my way home. Managed not to bump into Jesper, which was a bit of an accomplishment as Stockholm is just around 2 million people (?).

As of January 15, 2018, Site fix-up work has begun! Now do your part and report any bugs or deficiencies here

No guarantees, but if we don't report problems they won't get much of  a chance to be fixed! Details/discussions at link given just above.

 

"Some questions have no answers."[C Baird] "There comes a point where the spoon-feeding has to stop and the independent thinking has to start." [C Lawson] "There are always ways to disagree, without being disagreeable."[E Weddington] "Words represent concepts. Use the wrong words, communicate the wrong concept." [J Morin] "Persistence only goes so far if you set yourself up for failure." [Kartman]

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So did I, the first time. Then I subtracted the smaller from the larger - on the grounds that difference has no sign.

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Quote:
8 hrs of teaching Subversion,
You anarchist you...

John Samperi

Ampertronics Pty. Ltd.

www.ampertronics.com.au

* Electronic Design * Custom Products * Contract Assembly

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Johann, you seem to be a little mixed up... :D

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From a design point of view ... the clock is superfluous.

:lol:

Ross

Ross McKenzie ValuSoft Melbourne Australia

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It's a fail-safe device. If he forgets to press the button it goes off anyway.

Leon Heller G1HSM

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It may cause a bit of a problem during DST changeover... :?

John Samperi

Ampertronics Pty. Ltd.

www.ampertronics.com.au

* Electronic Design * Custom Products * Contract Assembly

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Quoth the white rabbit: "I'm late, I'm late..."

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Jokerman wrote:

You get to know the manufacturers that are not good on this matter - you know who you are Philips/NXP :evil:

-=mike=-

Are you saying that one should be carefull with NXP micros, because they tend to obsolate without replacment? I'm asking it, beacuse I'm thinking of using their Cortex LPC1343 in a project and long term availability would be important.

This long term availability question is a really good one to discuss. I would like very much to hear your experiences about different manufacturers, and designs. As I'm new in the EE field (doing it for some years), it would be great to know what are poeple with many years of experience thinking about different manufacturers and chips.

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Microchip is very good about keeping devices in production.

Leon Heller G1HSM

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While Atmel is good at deprecating them in favour of better devices.

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Microchip is constantly bringing out new and improved devices, as well as keeping the old ones in production. Keeping old devices in production is popular with some manufacturers because they don't have to get equipment re-approved, as is the case if a chip has to be replaced. It can be an expensive process.

Leon Heller G1HSM

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Now we know that Microchip is good at that. What about STMicro, TI, Analog Devices, Maxim-Dallas, Cypress, NXP, Silabs.....

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TI and ADI are quite good, as well, I've found. NXP has a bad reputation in that respect.

Leon Heller G1HSM

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My teacher assign me a project on "voice control home appliances using micro-controller and sensor" and now i don't know which sensor should i used that detect human commands like light and controlling fan speed through human commands in Proteus and coding in mikroc. please help me.

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Stop randomly posting the same question! Sure you've got a problem, but that doesn't mean you can spam the forum.

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i was posted it in wrong forum so that's why.

Topic locked