Difference: Micro Speaker/Buzzer?

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#1
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Hi everyone,
I'm a speaker/sound newbie and need some advice:
I want to play simple music on my Atmega8. it should be real wave sounds, but the quality can be crappy, thats ok.

Here is my question:
Does anyone know what the advantage of a tiny loud speaker (about 10mm diameter) over a piezo buzzer like the following:

http://parts.digikey.com/1/parts...

is?

Are there sounds I can not play with the buzzer but with the speaker? Because I CAN output different frequencies with the buzzer, so could I also output 'real' sound on the buzzer? Sound quality is not a problem.

The speakers are bigger and cost more, so I thought they must have an advantage.

Thanks a lot,
Tappo

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Buzzer tends to be a single frequency. Some have the electronics inside so you just apply power. With these, all you do is - turn on - bzzzzzzz - turn off. Other buzzers require you to pulse it at the buzz rate. They tend to be pretty narrow band and would allow only the simplest of sounds.

The one you reference appears to be the second kind and is optimum at 3.1KHz. You can get it to vary its output frequency, but only over a rather narrow range.

A speaker displaces in proportion to the applied voltage (or the average of the applied voltage as in the case of PWM drive). That is what you want for a "real wav sound".

Jim

 

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Thank you very much for the fast answer Jim!
Im going to give the speaker a try

Tappo

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Tappo - it's worth trying the Piezo transducers similar to this: http://uk.farnell.com/1192520/el...

They're dirt cheap, and although they're resonant at the specified frequency, they'll actually work over quite a frequency range. Audio will be less than hi-fi but speech is certainly recognisable, and they have the added advantage that the drive signal is very low current. Stick 'em onto a flat soundbox surface and you'll be surprised how loud they are, too...

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Check the speaker ohms. 40 or above could be driven from avr pins. Less should be driven by a transistor or fet.

Imagecraft compiler user

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Placed your order yet?

My preference would be for the speaker, for the token difference in price, and the big difference in acoustic quality. (Acoustic quality, however, is a misnomer when dealing with inexpensive, board mounted speakers.)

You may wish to also look at the LM386 chip before you place your order. It is a low cost, low power, audio amplifier, that requires very few external parts, and can directly drive a small speaker. You can power it from +5V/Gnd. LM 386 Data

JC

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Keep also in mind is this a battery operated circuit or mains? BAttery operation means maximum conservation of power, so buy a cheap, high ohmage speaker and the most workable piezo, and make your choice, the speaker will give the best quality at the cost of power, the piezo has the best power consumption at the cost of quality.

The 'other' Jim

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