Designing a 5V ARM Arduino

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There was some recent discussion of having an ARM based Arduino which runs at 5V. Before I embark on a design, does anyone know if such a thing is already available? Searching of google reveals nothing.

 

To be clear, I mean a device that has a supply voltage of 5V and all IOs are 5V, not just a device that has some 5V tolerant IOs. An additional requirement is that the devices are widely available through retail distributors like RS, Farnell, Mouser, Digikey and not trade oriented ones. A bonus would be DIY friendly packages such as DIP or SOIC.

 

The second question is what chips are commonly available ? So far I have :

- NXP Kinetis E,L series

- Infineon XMC

- Cypress PSOC 4

- Spansion FM3

- Fujitsu MB9A110

 

As I have worked with NXP and Infineion devices, I would favour those. The MKL26Z128VLH4 looks nice, ARM Cortex M4 MCU, 48MHz, 128 kB Flash, 64-Pin LQFP.

 

 

Bob.

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Why would anyone want to use 5V GPIO ?

 

Most external electronics requires 3.3V logic.   It is a pain to provide level shifting to 5V Arduinos.   Especially for bi-directional pins.

 

The only common device that seems to require 5V is the cheap 16x2 LCD display.   And the only reason for "5V" is to provide 5V - 4.5V for the VO "contrast" pin.   The LCD is quite happy with 3.3V logic.    A Due or Zero provides 5V for the LCD and 3.3V logic.

 

David.

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Sorry, discussion of "why 5V" is off topic, try a different thread.

Bob.

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Entirely on topic. Why 5v?

The largest known prime number: 282589933-1

It's easy to stop breaking the 10th commandment! Break the 8th instead. 

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I was having a discussion with the renesas rep on friday regarding 5V - seems there's a big demand for it. Automotive being one. Renesas have a M4 5V device in their synergy series. I was playing with a psoc4 last week - i was looking at a 8051 replacement.

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Infineon have an arduino style dev board for abotu $20 or so http://www.infineon.com/cms/en/p... which runs at 5V. Also includes a Segger debug port. I've been quite impressed with Infineon so far, will order one to play with.

 

As Infineon have it covered, I will go with MKE02Z32VLC4, 32bit ARM Cortex M0+ Microcontroller, 40MHz, 32 kB Flash, 32-Pin QFP. A small disadvantage for the hobbyist with most Kinetis parts is that they lack a ROM bootloader.

 

 

 

Bob.

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It seems to me that the recipe for this would be, "take one Arduino Zero, remove the ATSAMD21, and replace it with an ATSAMC21". Of course I know there would be a little more involved than that but the concept seems sound.

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microcontrollerguy wrote:
It seems to me that the recipe for this would be, "take one Arduino Zero, remove the ATSAMD21, and replace it with an ATSAMC21". Of course I know there would be a little more involved than that but the concept seems sound.

 

That would be nice :) I missed Atmel SAMC in my part search, there don't seem to be any parts available yet.

 

If there is software compatibility between SAMC-SAMD, that would save an awful lot of work.

Bob.

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Hey David,

I have a large collection of older TTL chips that require 4.5V-5.5V, so I need 5V GPIO pins.  I could upgrade to newer TTL that is 3.3V compatible, but I like using the old chips I have lying around.  I am really trying hard to come up with a reason to run a microcontroller at 5V just for you, other than the data sheet claims that an ATmega328 wont run at 16MHz at 3.3V, although they usually do, but is not guaranteed by Atmel.

 

But because of your continued urging to everyone to stick with 3.3V, I have been converting some of my 5V wall warts over to 3.3V, so I have plenty of each.

 

Mark

Last Edited: Mon. Sep 5, 2016 - 01:58 AM
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Digikey US appears to have several varieties of SAMC in Stock including the SAMC21. I haven't reviewed the data sheet in detail but I think it is essentially a drop in replacement for the SAMD.

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Anyone that makes commercial products for a living can recite from memory exactly how many sensors are ratiometric from 0 to 3.3V. Zero. There are thousands that range from 0 to 5V. This might be a growth niche for Honeywell or other sensor makers, but right now, if you want to measure analog pressure etc, you use a 5V a/d.

 

Imagecraft compiler user

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microcontrollerguy wrote:
Digikey US appears to have several varieties of SAMC in Stock including the SAMC21. I haven't reviewed the data sheet in detail but I think it is essentially a drop in replacement for the SAMD.

 

Thanks for the tip. I've got the Arduino Zero reference design, and will work on a variant. In the meantime, I will try retrofitting a SAMC21 into a Zero board, the pinout appears to be compatible. I can use that to develop a software package, even though it will still run at 3.3V. There appear to be a few differences in peripherals, but hopefully nothing significant.

Bob.

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bobgardner wrote:

Anyone that makes commercial products for a living can recite from memory exactly how many sensors are ratiometric from 0 to 3.3V. Zero. There are thousands that range from 0 to 5V. This might be a growth niche for Honeywell or other sensor makers, but right now, if you want to measure analog pressure etc, you use a 5V a/d.

 

 

But wouldn't a divide by 2 put it nicely in the range of a 3v processor?

The largest known prime number: 282589933-1

It's easy to stop breaking the 10th commandment! Break the 8th instead. 

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donotdespisethesnake wrote:
There was some recent discussion of having an ARM based Arduino which runs at 5V. Before I embark on a design, does anyone know if such a thing is already available?

 

As well as the ones mentioned above, look also at these, which have Debug-Links and VCom ports included - 5V ARMs 

 

https://direct.nuvoton.com/en/nu...

https://direct.nuvoton.com/en/nu...   $10, NUC131 core, 

https://direct.nuvoton.com/en/nu...  $39.92 - NUC472, 84MHz ARM4, Ethernet, Audio, 1M SRAM, ....

 

Embedded Flash 512 KB
SRAM 64 KB
External SRAM 1 MB
On Board Devices I Audio Codec (NAU8822LYG), supports MIC, line-in and headset
On Board Devices II On board 6-axis IMU (MPU6500)
On Board Devices III Buzzer
On Board Devices IV MIC
On Board Devices V Supports RTC battery
Interfaces Arduino UNO / Ethernet / USB OTG and Host / TF / RS232 / RS485 / CAN / Audio

Tool chains also include CooCox

http://www.coocox.org/book/cooco...

 

 

Kartman wrote:

david.prentice wrote:

Why would anyone want to use 5V GPIO ?

I was having a discussion with the renesas rep on friday regarding 5V - seems there's a big demand for it. Automotive being one. Renesas have a M4 5V device in their synergy series. I was playing with a psoc4 last week.

 

Yes, the range of 5V ARMs (and similar), is certainly growing, and that is due to demand.

Besides the Sensors mentioned, there is also Direct Drive of Logic Level MOSFETs possible with 5V, as well as enough voltage to drive Blue/White LEDs with useful Rs.

Add to that the 5V universal power plug-pack standard, and the 'demise of 5V' is certainly looking over-rated.

 

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The Nuvoton boards look very interesting and cheap.    However,  paying $30 to ship a $10 board to the UK seems crazy.

 

Does this apply to the US or Australia? 

 

Other companies like ST or NXP have Distributors that stock evaluation boards.   e.g. you can just buy a ST board from Farnell or RSWWW.    Delivered the next day.    Even Atmel boards are stocked in Europe.

 

David.

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david.prentice wrote:

The Nuvoton boards look very interesting and cheap.    However,  paying $30 to ship a $10 board to the UK seems crazy.

 

Does this apply to the US or Australia? 

 

 

David, I went to investigate for you but got annoyed that I had to create an account with them before finding out the delivery costs. I get more than enough emails/spam each day as it is without allowing more voluntarily.

Ross McKenzie ValuSoft Melbourne Australia

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paying $30 to ship a $10 board to the UK seems crazy.

 Only $25 to ship one to the US.  Digikey has some of their other eval boards at the origina non-sale price (~$20), but not the Uno-like version, that I can see.

 

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westfw wrote:
Only $25 to ship one to the US.  Digikey has some of their other eval boards at the origina non-sale price (~$20), but not the Uno-like version, that I can see.  

 

Digikey shows 1472 Nuvoton items, but sparsely stocked, and not that up to date - quite a pipeline delay here. 

They do show prices on NUC131 chip, (but not the Eval board) & not the NUC472/Boards or the N76E885/Board