Circuit Cellar article with AVR & familiar author

Go To Last Post
6 posts / 0 new
Author
Message
#1
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

The current issue of Circuit Cellar has a feature article authored by regular Forum contributor Dick Cappels. Good job, Dick.

Abstract:

"Microcontroller-Based Digital Lock-In Milliohmmeter
FEATURE ARTICLE by Dick Cappels

A milliohmmeter is a handy tool for tasks like measuring a switch’s contact resistance and checking the trace resistance on a PCB. Dick built his own microcontroller-based digital milliohmmeter using lock-in amplifier topology. The project is simple as long as you follow Dick’s
instructions. Get ready to improve analog performance with a microcontroller."

Lee

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

I always see that advert in Nuts & Volts for "short circuit detector" that is said to pinpoint a short on a PCB.. high accuracy between 0 and 150 ohms.
Guess I can make my own now! Thanks Dick

Next: Right beside it is the ad for "in circuit capacitance meter" .. These tools supposedly used by some big-boy names you'd recognize. Betcha an AVR would help that problem too!! he he

Scott

admin's test signature
 

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

Ooooooh. I think I shall be taking a look at this. Milliohm meters (Tone Ohms) have saved me a lot of time and hassle in rectifying prototype manufacturing defects in the past. A very useful piece of kit. Especially if they can make a varying audible output, which if course everybody else in the lab will find most annoying. :-)

Sacha.

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

Someone noticed.......... :=}

"...(Tone Ohms) have saved me a lot of time and hassle..." But you will have to add your own tone - shouldn'e be hard at all since one of the timers is unused. Should be able to make it as annoying it as you want to.

I owe a debt of thanks to AVRFreaks like Colin who put up with my questions ad nauseam, yet gave valuable information, that helped me to start to understand the AVR.

Dick

admin's test signature
 

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

Good job, congratulations.
A milliohm meter is probably one of the more important pieces of test equipment one could have. A very invaluable tool to have.

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

Hello,

Very cool! Just took a look at it now.

Especially if they can make a varying audible output, which if course everybody else in the lab will find most annoying. :-)

I think what you've got to do is figure out the frequencies that the "finger nails on chalkboard" are at, then use those as your tone ;-)

Warm Regards,

-Colin