Choosing a 2.4GHz Transceiver (802.15.4)

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I've been swimming in the sea of 2.4GHz transceiver modules available (similar to an XBee), and it's been a bit daunting.  I was hoping to get input on a suitable solution for a high volume design which will be used worldwide.  The XBee is up to the task, but didn't seem the best option for a high volume design.

 

I'm working on a design that requires the use of wireless data communication, as well as having many nodes communicating to one main "hub" (up to 20).  The transmitting distance will not be any greater than 100 feet (obstructed by interior wood frame walls).  The specs I am seeking:

 

RF Standard:  802.15.4 (could change if needed)

Frequency:  2.4GHz

Data Rate: 250 kbps is plenty, could go lower

Antenna type:  PCB trace antenna preferred for a compact design

Interface:  SPI, I2C, or UART

Supply Voltage:  3.3Vdc

Encryption:  not required, but will be used if available at price point

 

I'd like a transceiver that is a drop in module that is FCC tested to mitigate any issues with RF certification of the final product / design.  My goal is to find something that is around $8 dollars each in quantities of 1000.

 

Any help is appreciated.

 

 

Last Edited: Thu. Oct 15, 2015 - 09:54 PM
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Just the transciever module -- ATZB-RF-233 (http://www.atmel.com/images/atme...).

 

But your price point is unrealistic for a certified module.

NOTE: I no longer actively read this forum. Please ask your question on www.eevblog.com/forum if you want my answer.

Last Edited: Fri. Oct 2, 2015 - 07:18 PM
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OK, that's not a big shock about meeting the price point. It seems then the option is either pay a higher component cost for a certified module, which will payback potentially during FCC testing, or design the board with a transceiver chip integrated and potentially have issues during FCC testing. Does this about sum it up?

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Yep. Paying for the module, you are pretty much paying for FCC.

 

Atmel provides good reference designs for RF part that have been FCC pre-scanned. But no one can guarantee the result until you actually try.

NOTE: I no longer actively read this forum. Please ask your question on www.eevblog.com/forum if you want my answer.

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alexru wrote:

Yep. Paying for the module, you are pretty much paying for FCC.

 

Atmel provides good reference designs for RF part that have been FCC pre-scanned. But no one can guarantee the result until you actually try.

Thanks for the info, I will look into the reference designs!

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Its not AVR but microchip have a certified module: MRF24J40MA-I/RM

http://www.mouser.com/ProductDet...

 

It $9.30 1 off

and $6.08 in 100 off

 

I am sure you could get better pricing for 1000 off.

 

 

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For that transceiver note very low TX power (0 dBm, so forget 100 ft obstructed) and much higher power consumption (compared to Atmel).

 

But if both of those things are not a problem for you, then yes, that module might work.

NOTE: I no longer actively read this forum. Please ask your question on www.eevblog.com/forum if you want my answer.

Last Edited: Tue. Oct 6, 2015 - 04:26 PM