Car key remote

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Hello guys i need some help if anyone knows the solution.
Here is the thing: my car key fell on ground and 1 part inside is missing( lost it when i opened). Based on my knoledge it is some SMD resistor bit problem is i dont know which one ( value in Ohms). I have a picture and maybe some of you know which one is it or how can i find out its value.

P.S. car model is Seat Toledo 2001 y.

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Last Edited: Tue. May 11, 2021 - 05:13 PM
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Might help to know the car's make, model & age.

 

Have you tried a forum specifically for that make and/or model?

 

Mase wrote:
Based on my knowledge it is some SMD resistor

How do you reach that conclusion?

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Oh my bad. I forgot to write those info. Car is seat toledo 2001.
I have googled almost whole day and nothing. I typed circuit board number to find schematic but no help.

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Do you have a second remote?

 

Depending upon your electronics skills one might remove the identical "missing part" from the good remote, measure it, put it back, and then install a similar part in the broken remote.

 

JC

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I'd try a 10k and see what happens!

 

 

(Possum Lodge oath) Quando omni flunkus, moritati.

"I thought growing old would take longer"

 

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Yes, trial and error would be one approach...  surprise

 

A quick Google search showed that it is a rather primitive, (by today's standards), 433 MHz transmitter.

 

Even a photo of a good unit would show one whether the component was likely a resistor or a cap.

 

Murphy's Law, of course, would say that its the one diode, or inductor, in the circuit!

 

JC

 

 

 

 

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car model is Seat Toledo

 WHAT????  type something that makes sense, like Chevy Camaro.

I apologize!  Strange as it sounds, that is actually the name of a car!!!  Who'da thunk

 

https://articulo.mercadolibre.co...

 

When in the dark remember-the future looks brighter than ever.   I look forward to being able to predict the future!

Last Edited: Tue. Dec 29, 2020 - 09:24 PM
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I would do that but there is only one key

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Yes but it's broken already so whats to lose trying?

Have you tried looking for a replacement key fob, there are some universal types too.  

Look on ebay, I bought one that the wife had broken the case, the guts still worked, so bought one that had been dropped into water and no longer worked cheap.

Cleaned up the case and put her pcb inside and it was like new again.

 

Jim

 

 

(Possum Lodge oath) Quando omni flunkus, moritati.

"I thought growing old would take longer"

 

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Trace out what those pads are connected to, that should give you a good indication to what should be their. If it goes to the IC on the back, then look up what the pins do.

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Also have a look at the component above it with imprint 0002 ( actually it is 2000 upside down) It seems to be broken/cracked too at the right hand side.

 

Did you do the scratching in the lower left corner yourself?

Best is to find a seat or perhaps better a seat toledo forum site that is still a bit active and ask someone to open up their key and make a picture of it and hope it is the same. Or perhaps they know what to look for in a replacement. did a quick Alie check and it shows a number of very cheap ones. Bigger problem perhaps is going to be how to pair the key and the car as you need special tools for that I think.

 

 

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avrcandies wrote:
Chevy Camaro.

 

That's a car name? Who'd a thunk it! laugh

 

My car is a Coupé Fiat (in that order please, and with an accent on the é). Though I did have for many years, until I moved to Germany, a Seat Leon which is basically the same car as the Toledo with a different body style. But no longer having the car, I no longer have the key, so I can't look inside it.

 

Is there a prize for the most helpful post of the year?

 

Neil

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Actualy pairing key to car is easy no tools needed. There is simple step how to sync frequency of central lock to the remote.

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If you take a photo of the other side of the PCB and post here we can try to recreate the schematic and figure out what component is missing. Looks like a very simple circuit.

/Jakob Selbing

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Here is other side mate. Thank you

Attachment(s): 

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Well I have an old Volkswagen key. I was going to take it apart on your behalf but soon realised it has 3 buttons whereas yours has only two. I got as far as determining it had a much bigger PCB than yours with contact pads for a CR2032 and was made by Hella. I couldn't easily extract the PCB (no screws to be found) so I went no further.

 

Is there a prize for the most helpful post of the year?

 

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Now that I can see the other side I would say the missing component was a capacitor not resistor.

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I would check with a car recycle place, they must have keys similar to yours that they don't have any use for (my guess they have a box full of old keys)

Last Edited: Wed. Dec 30, 2020 - 11:06 AM
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Mase wrote:
Actualy pairing key to car is easy no tools needed

Are you sure?

 

Mase wrote:
There is simple step how to sync frequency of central lock to the remote

You may be thinking of the procedure for re-syncing an existing key - pairing a new key could well be an entirely different matter.

 

That was certainly the case with Vauxhalls of that era...

Top Tips:

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  3. Wrong baud rate is usually due to not running at the speed you thought; check by blinking a LED to see if you get the speed you expected
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sparrow2 wrote:
I would check with a car recycle place

We call those "Junk Yards" or "Salvage Yards" over here.

Never thought of asking for key fobs, but your probably right, they have a box full of them!

 

Jim

 

 

(Possum Lodge oath) Quando omni flunkus, moritati.

"I thought growing old would take longer"

 

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sparrow2 wrote:

I would check with a car recycle place

ki0bk wrote:
We call those "Junk Yards" or "Salvage Yards" over here.

"scrap yards" or "breakers yards" over here.

 

In the days when we used to look things up in the phone book, they were under "vehicle dismantlers"

 

Anyhow, I agree that they'd be a good place to try; you don't need it to work - just to see what component goes in that spot.

 

Similarly ebay.

 

And, again, dedicated forums or user groups or owner's clubs ...

Top Tips:

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  3. Wrong baud rate is usually due to not running at the speed you thought; check by blinking a LED to see if you get the speed you expected
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It is a cap...try 0.01uf, maybe 0.1uF

 

from the web

 

BAD SOLDERING!!!!

Hello everybody, Can someone tell me which component it is on the attached
Picture is (top left, red arrow)? My radio key has the same Circuit board, only this component is missing from me and the key is
therefore without function. I am very grateful for a hint!

 

When in the dark remember-the future looks brighter than ever.   I look forward to being able to predict the future!

Last Edited: Wed. Dec 30, 2020 - 04:33 PM
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When in the dark remember-the future looks brighter than ever.   I look forward to being able to predict the future!

Last Edited: Wed. Dec 30, 2020 - 04:57 PM
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Junk yard key fobs are quite expensive. I recently considered buying one for my Volkswagen Passat 2008. Turned out they cost at least 500 SEK - about 50 EUR/USD.
Instead I bought a VCDS and was able to re-sync the key I already had to the car.

/Jakob Selbing

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I dare say I was going to guess the missing part is a Capacitor due to teh brownish 'remains' of teh case still there.  This guess gained some muscle from teh picture in post #24.

 

At the same time a quick Ebay search shows that you can get these remotes for under $25.00:

 

https://www.ebay.com/itm/2x-for-...

 

which begs the question.....why fix the old one?

 

 

Jim

I would rather attempt something great and fail, than attempt nothing and succeed - Fortune Cookie

 

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Atmel Studio6.2/AS7, DipTrace, Quartus, MPLAB, RSLogix user

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jgmdesign wrote:

which begs the question.....why fix the old one?

 

 

Jim

I tend to try and repair everything I can for 2 reasons
1. Lest waste going to the landfill
2. Why spend $25.00 when you can most likely fix it for a couple bucks. It's a good learning experience to fix and repair broken electronics.

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With all these photos found on the web it sure would be nice to have a schematic.   A poster mentioned that this is a 433MHz transmitter circuit.   Perhaps googling for "433MHz car fob schematic" would help.

 

It looks like the missing cap goes to the "A" push switch.   This switch may be connected to the positive of the battery so when it is pressed, the 433MHz oscillator is powered on and so is the Motorola IC on the back.  The Motorola would modulate this signal to meet the signal needed by the internal RX unit found under the car's dash.

 

These stupid little 20-year-old car fob keys are just nightmares, aren't they?   Really, if you need one and can get one for $25 on eBay, just do it.   Then figure out somehow what that missing cap value is and put a replacement in it.  Test it over and over again, until you are sure that it works normally.  Then hide it in your car's trunk "boot"  along with an extra tested battery. 

 

So when it's 3AM, and it's -10 degrees outside, and there's a patch of black ice in front of the driver's side door that you didn't see, and you slipped on the ice, and the key fob fell out of your hand, and under the car, and broke apart into a dozen pieces.   So then you just get the replacement from the trunk, turn on the engine, go home to a nice warm bed.

Last Edited: Wed. Dec 30, 2020 - 10:46 PM
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Simonetta wrote:
So then you just get the replacement from the trunk,
... and if the trunk is also locked?

Ross McKenzie ValuSoft Melbourne Australia

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I have difficulty imagining a modern car in which the boot would not be locked at the same time as the doors, given the prevalence of central locking.

 

Neil (just use the fourth dimension)

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valusoft wrote:

Simonetta wrote:
So then you just get the replacement from the trunk,
... and if the trunk is also locked?

You then get the spare spare key from the concealed magnetic key keeper hidden under the wheel arch.

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Brian Fairchild wrote:

You then get the spare spare key from the concealed magnetic key keeper hidden under the plastic wheel arch.

Fixed that for you.

 

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I once bought I car, and the owner only gave me one key, and showed me where the other was, it was inside the left front turning light you needed to know it was there to be able to see it, I never had to remove it :) 

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sparrow2 wrote:
it was inside the left front turning light

surprise

 

did he explain how it got there?

Top Tips:

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  3. Wrong baud rate is usually due to not running at the speed you thought; check by blinking a LED to see if you get the speed you expected
  4. Difference between a crystal, and a crystal oscillatorhttps://www.avrfreaks.net/comment...
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Brian Fairchild wrote:
You then get the spare spare key from the concealed magnetic key keeper hidden under the wheel arch.

But most modern cars are all plastic under the wheel well!!!

 

 

 

 

(Possum Lodge oath) Quando omni flunkus, moritati.

"I thought growing old would take longer"

 

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Spare keys always make me think of when a bunch of guys were out in the lot trying to open a Firebird(?) with the keys locked inside...they kept coming into our building for coat hangers, wood sticks, prybar, grabbers, etc.  After a half hour I went out & they were still hard at it.  Two guys were bending the driver's window back about 1-2 inches while another was desperately trying to press the hard-to-get unlock button (in the center by the shifter) with some stiff zig-zag'd wire.   I walked up on the passenger side, watching them sweat.   For some reason I took my Jeep or other key and it slid into the lock!  One turn & the passenger door swung upon, while the guys were still fighting it out.  I poked my head into the car and looked at them.  I wish I had a video of their faces contorting in confusion as it registered that my head was inside the car looking out at them!  I had only been there maybe 15 seconds, so it was quite humorous.  

When in the dark remember-the future looks brighter than ever.   I look forward to being able to predict the future!

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Yes he put it there so if he lost the key there was a spare key on car. (you could get from the outside)

Last Edited: Fri. Jan 1, 2021 - 01:30 AM
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