Butterfly display died.

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The LCD display on one of my Butterflys died under mysterious circumstances.

It has been sitting on a window sill for 1 year and 10 months. The LCD faces toward the window. The Butterfly monitors the outside light intensity with the built-in light sensor. It is attached to an X-10 remote control. It turns night lights on at dusk and off at dawn.

The Butterfly does it's job perfectly but the LCD display does not work. I first noticed a problem about 8 months ago. I picked it up and waggled the joystick, but no joy. I tried it the next day and the LCD worked. At least that's the way I remember it. I tried it a few months later and the LCD wouldn't work. It hasn't worked since.

The coin cell battery seems to be good and puts out 3.0 volts. I removed it and am now powering it from an external supply. Still no LCD. The RS232 works. I can send it commands and get responses. I reloaded the software with the bootloader. Still no LCD.

The joystick works and the current draw looks good. Everything is okay except the LCD. Do you think sitting in the sunshine for 2 years killed it. Maybe it overdosed on vitamin D. :)

P.S. This is a stock Butterfly with the original Mega169pv. Never been overclocked!

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One of many results of Googling "LCD sunlight damage"

Quote:
Dear Sam,

To make it short: Yes, direct sunlight does damage LCD screens.

The Liquid Crystal conists of long chains of organic molecules.
Like most organic materials, these get damaged (in this case
broken up into smaller chains) by UV light. This, over a long
time, blurs the picture and reduces contrast and brightness.
However, exposure to normal levels of sunlight is taken into
consideration when a screen is designed, and will not do much
harm over the normal lifetime (usually 3 years). And window
glass filters out most of the sun's UV components. So there is
nothing to worry if your screen is in the sun occasionally. But
I would not put it outside on a clear, sunny day too often!

Greetings,

But look on the bright side, now you can desolder the display and have an extra couple of dozen I/O pins.

Smiley

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smileymicros wrote:

But look on the bright side, now you can desolder the display and have an extra couple of dozen I/O pins.

Smiley


zoomcityzoom once mentioned that it was easy to remove the LCD but he didn't say how he did it. Maybe ChipQuik ?

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Hi
Actually I didn't knew that LCD's didn't like sun light :-/
Good to know if you're designing new products :)

uC's: Atmega16, 32, 64, 128 and Attiny13
Lang.: C
Interests: Small scale robots AND sensor monitoring system

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I guess it won't be a problem unless the LCD is placed in a south facing window for a year or two.

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hehe okay :P

uC's: Atmega16, 32, 64, 128 and Attiny13
Lang.: C
Interests: Small scale robots AND sensor monitoring system

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I suppose if it is mounted outside you wouldn't want it exposed to direct sunlight, unless you put UV sunglasses on it. :)

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Or just apply a lot of sunscreen :P

uC's: Atmega16, 32, 64, 128 and Attiny13
Lang.: C
Interests: Small scale robots AND sensor monitoring system