Is a BSP225 a P-Fet , even though its called a P-type D-MOS

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Guyzz

I just bought a Roll of these BSP225

P-channel enhancement mode vertical D-MOS transistor
http://www.nxp.com/acrobat/datas...

I have some 2N7002 in SMD
http://www.nxp.com/acrobat/datas...

And was hoping the BSP225 was like the "N7002 ,but a P-Fet

But now i wonder what the D-MOS "buzzword" stands for ?

It looks to me as a P-Fet (but i'm not experienced).

Can anyone clarify if it behaves like a P-fet , and just have another name ?

/Bingo

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You did a good purchase there !
Yep, you can see them as a complement of the 2N7002

About the buzz-word: I don't know, but I've seen that D-MOS-word in several fet-datasheets. It has to do with the proces used for fabrication. I checked Wiki, but not much usefull found.

My hope is that Jim will know where it stands for :)

Nard

PS Where did you find the BSP225's ?

A GIF is worth a thousend words   They are called Rosa, Sylvia, Tricia, and Ulyana. You can find them https://www.linuxmint.com/

Dragon broken ? http://aplomb.nl/TechStuff/Dragon/Dragon.html for how-to-fix tips

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Plons wrote:

PS Where did you find the BSP225's ?

ebay.de

/Bingo

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Bingo600 wrote:
But now i wonder what the D-MOS "buzzword" stands for ?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/MOS...
Quote:
DMOS

DMOS stands for double-diffused metal–oxide–semiconductor. Most of the power MOSFETs are made using this technology.

Basically there's two main types of single-gate MOSFETs (disregarding P-channel vs N-channel types).
The two main types of MOSFET:
1) Enhancement-mode MOSFET (normally off). This is by far the most common type of MOSFET and there's many different manufaturers, used as a switch it operates very similar to a standard bipolar transistor.
2) Depletion-mode MOSFET (normally on). This is a much rarer type of MOSFET that is on at 0V G-S (normally on). Many MOSFET manufacturers doesn't even manufacture any depletion-mode MOSFETs. One company that does make depletion-mode MOSFETs is Supertex http://www.supertex.com

You can often tell Enhancement-mode and Depletion-mode MOSFETs apart by looking at the schematic symbols: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/MOS...
Sometimes three line segments are used for enhancement mode and a solid line for depletion mode. Another line is drawn parallel to the channel for the gate.
There's however also another schematic symbol for Enhancement-mode MOSFET without any arrows although this symbol becomes less and less common for discrete transistors and the one with the three line segments is the most common. But the other symbol withoiut arrows can often be seen in schematics of IC internals.

P-channel MOSFETs:
.
Depletion Enhancement

Sometimes the internal diode between drain and source is shown in the schematic symbol like in the BSP225 datasheet you linked to, but other times this diode it not shown in the symbol. But no matter if the diode is shown or not in the symbol, it's always there, you can't make a MOSFET without it.

It's easier/cheaper to manufacture a good N-channel MOSFET than a good P-channel MOSFET. An N-channel will either be cheaper or have a lower Rds,on at the same price. That's why N-channel transistors are always preferred over P-channel whereever possible. Especially for high power applications where Rds,on and price really matters.

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@AA
Thanx for the info

/Bingo

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The D stands for the manufacturers "type of trench" made for the active junction. Motorola called theirs T, someone else (Siliconix?) called theirs V and then there is your D MOS. I believe to cater for patent issues. From memory the V came first.