AVRISP MKII Availability

Go To Last Post
20 posts / 0 new
Author
Message
#1
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

It has been several years since I needed to buy a programmer.  I finally have some time to do some projects at home, and want to get an inexpensive programmer (no debugging functionality needed).  By default, I planned on procuring an AVRISP MKII programmer.  However, I cannot find anyone who has any in stock.  I checked the usual suspects (Digikey, Mouser, etc., and even Atmel) -- to no avail.

 

Am I missing something?  Is this programmer no longer supported, or is this some sort of temporary shortage?

 

Does anyone know of any esoteric vendors that may have some in stock?  I'd really rather not wait for some interminable lead time...  If not, does anyone have a spare AVRISP mkII they'd be willing to sell?

This topic has a solution.

The question to everyone's answer is usually asked from within

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

The ISP MKII has been retired

 

YOu can get a Dragon for $50.00 or an Atmel ICE and not only have the ISP, but you have a debugger as well.

 

If you are dead set on an MKII then I suggest EBAY

 

JIm

I would rather attempt something great and fail, than attempt nothing and succeed - Fortune Cookie

 

"The critical shortage here is not stuff, but time." - Johan Ekdahl

 

"Step N is required before you can do step N+1!" - ka7ehk

 

"If you want a career with a known path - become an undertaker. Dead people don't sue!" - Kartman

"Why is there a "Highway to Hell" and only a "Stairway to Heaven"? A prediction of the expected traffic load?"  - Lee "theusch"

 

Speak sweetly. It makes your words easier to digest when at a later date you have to eat them ;-)  - Source Unknown

Please Read: Code-of-Conduct

Atmel Studio6.2/AS7, DipTrace, Quartus, MPLAB, RSLogix user

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

Thanks for the quick reply, Jim.  I used an AVRISP mkii for years w/ no problems.  I've read many stories (here) about how easy it is to "slay" a dragon.

Is that still the case?

 

Debuggers aren't necessary when you write infallible code... ;)

The question to everyone's answer is usually asked from within

This reply has been marked as the solution. 
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

I had an original dragon for many years and never had a problem, while others slayed theirs quite effectively.

 

Go for the Atmel ICE.  I have one of those and I am rather happy with it.  Lets you work with just about every AVR/ARM Atmel makes.

 

Like I said, you get the programmer, and debugger all in one.

 

JIm

I would rather attempt something great and fail, than attempt nothing and succeed - Fortune Cookie

 

"The critical shortage here is not stuff, but time." - Johan Ekdahl

 

"Step N is required before you can do step N+1!" - ka7ehk

 

"If you want a career with a known path - become an undertaker. Dead people don't sue!" - Kartman

"Why is there a "Highway to Hell" and only a "Stairway to Heaven"? A prediction of the expected traffic load?"  - Lee "theusch"

 

Speak sweetly. It makes your words easier to digest when at a later date you have to eat them ;-)  - Source Unknown

Please Read: Code-of-Conduct

Atmel Studio6.2/AS7, DipTrace, Quartus, MPLAB, RSLogix user

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

good advice.  thanks.

The question to everyone's answer is usually asked from within

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

Oh, one suggestion.  Get the 'deluxe' version.  It comes with a couple of adapters that you say now you won't need, then later you are smacking your head for not getting them in the first place.

 

Trust me on that one.

 

Jim

I would rather attempt something great and fail, than attempt nothing and succeed - Fortune Cookie

 

"The critical shortage here is not stuff, but time." - Johan Ekdahl

 

"Step N is required before you can do step N+1!" - ka7ehk

 

"If you want a career with a known path - become an undertaker. Dead people don't sue!" - Kartman

"Why is there a "Highway to Hell" and only a "Stairway to Heaven"? A prediction of the expected traffic load?"  - Lee "theusch"

 

Speak sweetly. It makes your words easier to digest when at a later date you have to eat them ;-)  - Source Unknown

Please Read: Code-of-Conduct

Atmel Studio6.2/AS7, DipTrace, Quartus, MPLAB, RSLogix user

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

Oh no.

"The AVR Dragon sets a new standard for low-cost development tools". Except a) the MK II ISP was cheaper, at $39, and b) it came in a complete plastic enclosure, not a bare board, with all the relevant cables permanently installed. The Dragon doesn't even have a shroud on its ISP connector!

That's a quote from the Atmel website, incidentally.

Alternately, you could get an AVR-ICE, but nobody has them in stock, or an AVR-ONE for $655.00. (Digikey. $700? Shii....)

In short, crap.

I used to buy AVR ISP-MKII's to send to my clients so they could upgrade their software without my having to FedEx new chips - I could just email a new program and they were off to the races. Some used them on production lines. Now, with a bare board? Oh crap. Also read the disclaimer at the end of the Dragon datasheets "It is not a finished product". So why'd they terminate the MKII?? It was the best thing they made!!

I will now take a deep breath and open a beer and go think about roses for awhile.

Thank you,
Scroungre

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

Scroungre wrote:

I used to buy AVR ISP-MKII's to send to my clients so they could upgrade their software without my having to FedEx new chips - I could just email a new program and they were off to the races.

 

If you are looking for a solution, have a look at the Kanda Keyfob programmers.

#1 Hardware Problem? https://www.avrfreaks.net/forum/...

#2 Hardware Problem? Read AVR042.

#3 All grounds are not created equal

#4 Have you proved your chip is running at xxMHz?

#5 "If you think you need floating point to solve the problem then you don't understand the problem. If you really do need floating point then you have a problem you do not understand."

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

Thanks! I looked, and found this: http://www.kanda.com/products/Ka...

Which looks pretty close to what I want. All my boards have 6-pin ISP connectors (they're smaller!) and it does have an adaptor.

Anyone (including yourself, Mr. Fairchild!) with experience with that particular gadget? Does it work seamlessly with both older and newer (from 4.12 up) versions of AVR studio? In short, is it a lot like an AVR ISP MKII? Are there any new and fun features that make it even better? Let me know, if you can,

Thanks again,
S.

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

Scroungre wrote:

Anyone (including yourself, Mr. Fairchild!) with experience with that particular gadget?

 

Not that particular unit. I do use the keyfob units for production programming, keeping individual units programmed with the latest version of each product...

 

 

...(grabbed from the drawer).

 

Kanda's tech support is pretty good, it might be worth an email (or even phone call if you are UK based).

#1 Hardware Problem? https://www.avrfreaks.net/forum/...

#2 Hardware Problem? Read AVR042.

#3 All grounds are not created equal

#4 Have you proved your chip is running at xxMHz?

#5 "If you think you need floating point to solve the problem then you don't understand the problem. If you really do need floating point then you have a problem you do not understand."

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

Take a look at these by a fellow freak:

 

This photo is in the Off-Topic forum under the top sticky of "Post your project Pictures Here"

 

I plan on purchasing a few myself.

 

JIm

I would rather attempt something great and fail, than attempt nothing and succeed - Fortune Cookie

 

"The critical shortage here is not stuff, but time." - Johan Ekdahl

 

"Step N is required before you can do step N+1!" - ka7ehk

 

"If you want a career with a known path - become an undertaker. Dead people don't sue!" - Kartman

"Why is there a "Highway to Hell" and only a "Stairway to Heaven"? A prediction of the expected traffic load?"  - Lee "theusch"

 

Speak sweetly. It makes your words easier to digest when at a later date you have to eat them ;-)  - Source Unknown

Please Read: Code-of-Conduct

Atmel Studio6.2/AS7, DipTrace, Quartus, MPLAB, RSLogix user

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

I just bought an ICE.  Mouser had 116 of them as of a few minutes ago, and 479 of the full kit for $92.  The basic model is $53, and the upgrade to the full kit is about the same price as if you bought them together, so you can do it either way if you need more than just AVR use.  I am very happy with it.  In addition to programming with a 6-pin connector just like the obsoleted AVRISP mkII, you can also use it for a full on chip debugger together with Atmel Studio 6.2.  It works great.  I am really happy with it.

 

Good luck,mark

Last Edited: Mon. Apr 27, 2015 - 02:43 PM
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

Oops, I just added a new thread, on this same topic.

 

I see that Mouser is selling some units made by Olimex (Mouser Stock # 909-AVR-ISP-MK2). Does it play like the original, or do you need do invoke some special incantations ? 

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

threeneurons wrote:

I see that Mouser is selling some units made by Olimex (Mouser Stock # 909-AVR-ISP-MK2). Does it play like the original, or do you need do invoke some special incantations ? 

The olimex avr-isp-mk2 units are clones based on Dean Camera's LUFA firmware. It's very close functionally to the atmel programmer, and for my undemanding usage, it works perfectly adequately. I use avrdude, and the standard command line flags work for it:

$ avrdude -c avrispmkII -P usb -p atmega328p [etc...]

 

However, there are a few issues. Firstly, there's a known issue with LUFA and libusb, which means that there are two sets of firmware - one for atmel studio, and one for avrdude. If you don't switch between those two programming applications, then this issue really doesn't affect you. Secondly, the level shifter that it uses are just series resistors, rather than real level shifting hardware. That setup makes me nervous, and I would not use that in any production environment. It also limits targets to ~3.3V or higher.

 

- S

 

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

Sorry, I meant Mouser has Atmel ICE's.  Not AVRISP MK2's.  If you need a programmer, get an ICE.  It will do the same thing as an AVRISP mk2, and you can also use it to do on chip debugging with Atmel Studio 6.2.  Forget about the AVRISP, and get an ICE.  It is the Atmel replacement, and costs about fifty bucks.  Why do you want an AVRISP instead of an ICE?

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

Okay, you didn't get the back story, which I posted on a different thread that I started, before finding this one.

 

I already have a AVRISP MkII, and have been using it for years. It still works. A friend wanted one. I hadn't check on the current offerings. When I started to search the usual sources (Mouser & Digi-key), I could not find any. The only ones I found, were 3rd party clones (?). That's when I came back here, and did a topic search. I couldn't find a related thread, so I started my own, then I stumbled upon this existing thread. I guess I made a typo, on my initial search.

 

So basically, if you want to start playing with an AVR, today, then get the ATAtmel-ICE, and download Studio 6. They dropped the "AVR", in the tool names, since both support ARM, too. The ARM part, I was aware of. Personally, I hate Studio 6. Its a resource hog. When I'm forced to switch over to it, I'll have to get a new computer. Using 6 on my current machines makes paint drying look speedy. I still use AVR Studio 4 (4.19 I think).

 

And what's this Dragon thing ? A link to an existing thread is fine.

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

You don't have to use the whole of AS6 if you don't want. After installation you are left with atprogram.exe which is a program that works with all the current Atmel tools including Atmel-ICE to program AVRs.

 

The rough chronology of Atmel programmers/debuggers has been:

 

JTAGICE

AVRISPmkII

JTAGICEmkII

Dragon

JTAGICE3

AVR One!

Atmel-ICE

 

With the possible exception of AVR One! (that will always be good) they have got better(*) at each step.

 

(*) better = more functionality mainly.

 

So the Dragon was a tool of its time. It was both a programmer and debugger and could even do high voltage programming but the fact is that on the first model and, to a lesser extent the second issue, Atmel really screwed up the design of the PSU circuitry so lots of people burned their Dragons.

 

BTW Atmel are clearly trying to wean people off the older devices like JTAGICEmkII, JTAGICE3, Dragon, AVRISPMmkII by either running down stocks completely or pricing them stupidly high compared to Atmel-ICE. So I'd just go for the Atmel-ICE anyway.

Last Edited: Fri. May 22, 2015 - 08:49 AM
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

I agree with Mr. Clawson.  Plus I really like my ICE.

 

I also agree Atmel Studio 6.2 is big, but still, I love it.  I have a netbook on my workbench that only has 2GB of memory, and AS pretty much uses it up.  I grew up with Visual Studio in my professional life, and it has a lot of features for code development, which is what makes it big.  Maybe it is time for you to get a new computer.  You can get a Samsung laptop with 8GB of memory and 512 GB of storage for less than $400.  Maybe it is time to come into the 21st century.

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

I am going to go on a rant here for all of you Microsoft haters.  As you know the Microsoft products are all huge.  That's because they try to give their customers all the functionality they want.  Whenever Microsoft tries to make things smaller and remove functionality customers have no end of complaints, so the code grows and grows.  I don't know how many of you have worked on big pieces of code, but I did it for 40 years, and believe me, code only grows as more people want more features, and when it grows so do the number of bugs.  So if you think of it a resource hog you are forgetting about Moore's law.  The code only keeps up with the available processing power, so if your computer is too small to run the code it might be time to get a new computer.  They are so cheap these days it is ridiculous.  And don't even get me started on Apple.

 

I'm done now.

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

Thanks for the mention Jim; I appreciate it!