Avrdudess problem

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hello Guys

I'm using Avrdudess Gui for first time & its working good 

I'm trying to read a flash of atmega328 & its display OK.

(avr dude.exe: writing output file "c;\readtest.hex"

avrdude.exe done.  Thank you)

 

but in drive C I couldn't fine this file Even I have set the folder options to show everything in folders

I'm using widows 10

 

 

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johnny22 wrote:
I'm using widows 10
I hope you are using Windows 10 and not what you wrote above. ;)

 

When you use a GUI front end to avrdude.exe, like Avrdudess, you are at the mercy of the GUI.  What was the complete command line sent to avrdude.exe and what was actually received as a result?  Copy and paste please, what you typed in above was inaccurate. 

"I may make you feel but I can't make you think" - Jethro Tull - Thick As A Brick

"void transmigratus(void) {transmigratus();} // recursio infinitus" - larryvc

"It's much more practical to rely on the processing powers of the real debugger, i.e. the one between the keyboard and chair." - JW wek3

"When you arise in the morning think of what a privilege it is to be alive: to breathe, to think, to enjoy, to love." -  Marcus Aurelius

Last Edited: Tue. Jan 16, 2018 - 07:20 AM
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I'm using Avrdudess its an Graphical use interface of Avrdude

& after reading the chip there is a dos window which shows what is going on

 

here is what avrdudes say

(

Reading | ################################################## | 100% -0.00s

avrdude.exe: Device signature = 0x1e950f
avrdude.exe: reading flash memory:

Reading | ################################################## | 100% 4.75s

avrdude.exe: writing output file "c:\readtest.hex"

avrdude.exe done.  Thank you.)

 

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that looks like the file is being written                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                            to the root of your C drive (not a particularly good place to save files)

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Windows 10 may be hiding that file thinking it is a system file since you are writing to the root. Check the folder settings and ALLOW it to view system files and to show all file extensions.   I would create a c:\temp directory and tell it to write the file to "c:\temp\readtest.hex"

 

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You don't have permission to write a file there.  One way around this, at least temporarily, is to log in as an administrator.  I guess administrators can write most anywhere.

 

I tried to write a file to the root of the c: partition and I couldn't do it.

 

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Since W7, windoze has been snotty about where you can write files. You can't easily create a file in the rtoot (c:) directory although you CAN copy a file there. ( Go figure).

Same thing for program files -- although I imagine that applications that install by the rules can write there.

 

So, W10 may be blocking your file and not telling you about it -- it usually complains, but who knows. Easiest thing to do is to create a folder and set avrdudess to put the output there.

You can change permissions, but  that's harder.

 

hj

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ford2go wrote:

Since W7, windoze has been snotty about where you can write files. You can't easily create a file in the rtoot (c:) directory although you CAN copy a file there.

I had to test out the copy.  Yes I see what you mean.  A user account can copy there but first it must supply admin credentials. 

 

 

 

 

 

This reminds me of something I've seen about once a year ever since Windows 2000.  Generally a user account without a password can't access files on another computer on the LAN.  But once every 10 or 12 months, when I try that, Windows will pop up a window allowing me to supply admin credentials to get access.  WTF?

 

My memory isn't very good.  It's possible that XP always gave me that option.

Last Edited: Sun. Jul 15, 2018 - 12:06 PM
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So presumably there's a system policy that says "keep cached password for 365 days". Seems a little unwise, either something is secure in which case a password should be needed every time or at least no more than an hour or two beyond being given. Or it might as well not be secured at all.

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clawson wrote:

So presumably there's a system policy that says "keep cached password for 365 days". Seems a little unwise, either something is secure in which case a password should be needed every time or at least no more than an hour or two beyond being given. Or it might as well not be secured at all.

No, I wasn't clear.  Normally I cannot access files on the other computer when in a user account without a password.  But once a year or so, Windows pops up a window and lets me do the access if I give the credentials.  I wish it would do it every time, but no, only once a year or so.

 

Windows 10 popped it up a couple of weeks ago.  It's the first time Win10 ever did this.  I damn near fell off my chair.   I've been using Win10 for 1.5 years, at least.  Very very strange.  

 

Normally I get this: