AVRdb - 8-bit AVR database program

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I would like to present my little program "AVRdb" that contains a database with basic informations about all 8-bit AVR microcontrollers from the AT90, ATtiny, ATmega and ATxmega families. In addition, it presents arrangement and descriptions of fuse/lock bits that are available on selected chip.
Currently there are 354 models in database - including latest ATtiny/ATmega chips with UPDI interface. All informations come from datasheets and definition files (XML/ATDF) of the AVR/Atmel Studio environment. I wrote the program in C language using free "Open Watcom 1.9" IDE. Requirements: Windows 95+, CPU 386+.

You can download latest version of "AVRdb" with source code from: Link

You can also translate Polish web page with detailed description: Link

 

Last Edited: Sun. Jun 21, 2020 - 06:41 PM
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Nice program. It's easy to check the default fuse values.

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Good job, but: The static representation of information is one thing. There are many sources for this. The more targeted option of searching for certain controller properties would be more useful.

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Yeah, a 8-bit AVR database program sounds legit but does it work as good as it sounds? Seems to me that there are some questions. May be, it was good for a time when Google data analyzer was not so hyped and popular, and the functionality was not so widely known by anyone. Now, with such possibilities and tutorial websites like blog.coupler.io/spreadsheet-vs-database/ where you can understand for yourself what is the best option for you, a database or a spreadsheet, it’s obvious that such AVR databases are not required. Yet, I really appreciate the effort you put in this project. All the small startups lead to big projects.

Last Edited: Sun. Feb 21, 2021 - 09:57 AM
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Well, he gave the links - so you can try it and see for yourself!

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jimsock wrote:
does it work as good as it sounds?
That depends on what you are looking for. There have been updates in 2020 so it seems fairly up to date with things as late as Tiny1616 for example but the "data" it holds about each chip seems fairly limited:

 

(that's everything it has on 328P for example).

 

If I wanted "data" about AVRs I'd like to know things like how many UART, timers, etc. they had. This seems to be limited to very much the same info you would get in the Engbedded Fuse Calculator.

 

Last Edited: Fri. Feb 19, 2021 - 12:01 PM
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Unfortunately, this kind of program has no chance.
It would be much better if you could filter your controller from a database that is as complete and up-to-date as possible according to the criteria you are looking for. That would have at least something useful. Otherwise I'm much better off with documentation from the internet.

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He does mention ATDF but ultimately that is the way to do it. Have some program that recursively scans the "packs" for ATDF then display the data found there.

 

Of course one way is simply to learn to read .ATDF in the raw XML in which cass you can already find anything you might want to know there anyway.