AVR Studio with STK500

Go To Last Post
7 posts / 0 new
Author
Message
#1
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

I have AVR Studio Version 4.11 Build 403 Service Pack 3 which I wish to use with an ATmega8 on my STK500.
When I start AVR Studio it issues the message "Loaded plugin STK500", however the STK500 is not listed as one of the available debug platforms.
What am I missing? :?:

Laurence Boyd II

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

STK500 is a "programming platform" not a "debugging platform". To debug a processor running on an STK500 you are going to need some other form of debug interface - probably some form of JTAG adapter.

Cliff

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

Quote:
I wish to use with an ATmega8 on my STK500.

The ATmega8 doesn't have any on-chip debug facility. You'd have to use something like the ICE50 if you wanted to simulate the effects of running your program on a real circuit. (The ICE50 includes an adaptor that you insert in the target circuit instead of a real ATmega8.)

Most likely, you'll be better off selecting the AVR Simulator as the debug platform for most ATmega8 projects.

Again, you choice of debug platform will have no bearing whatsoever on your eventual selection of programming platform, so whatever debug platform you happen to settle on, you'll still be able to program and execute your software on the STK500.

If you were to move on to an ATmega88, then you could take advantage of its OCD facilities through the debugWire interface of the JTAGICE mkII.

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

Thanks guys. I will continue to use the AVR Simulator which is very usefull and program with AVR Prog. With the comments about AVR Studio working with the STK500, I was hoping there was a more direct route. :(

Laurence Boyd II

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

Oh, the programming procedure can be much more direct. You have no need of any extra hardware (such as the AVR910-type programming device), and the programming interface of the STK500 is much more intuitive than AVRProg.

1) Plug a serial cable from your PC to the RS232_CTRL port of the STK500.

2) Make sure the ATmega8 is installed in the correct slot (SCKT3200A2).

3) Mate sure that, at a minimum, the VTARGET jumper is shorted, so that the ATmega gets power.
3a) You may need to connect the other jumpers if you want to make use of other services such as the analog reference voltage, the reset circuitry, and the built-in clock generator. See your STK500 help file for details.

4) Connect a 6-pin ribbon cable from the ISP6PIN connector to the SPROG2 connector.

->None of these settings ever need to be modified as long as you're working with the ATmega8 as a target.

When you're ready to program the ATmega8, in AVR Studio, click the toolbar button that looks like an IC with the word "AVR" written on it. This will lead you to the STK500's programming interface.

If you're using a recent version of AVR Studio with an STK500 that has never been used for programming before, then you might be asked to perform a firmware upgrade first. You'll be much better off if you say "yes" to the firmware upgrade. Just make sure to remove any connection to the ISP6PIN connector before you start the firmware upgrade process.

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

Thanks, I finally read Section 5 of the STK500 manual :oops: When I used the AVR button, it found my STK500 and I upgraded its firmware. Although I haven't programmed my ATmega8 yet, I'm impressed by what I see for programming the flash and EEProm as well as Fuses and Lock bits. Again, Thank you very much :D

Laurence Boyd II

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Total votes: 0

Hi,

Be warned, if you are referring to the printed manual, it is not up to date. Atmel now only keeps the Studio Help files up to date, not the printed manuals and maybe even the PDF manuals on their website...not sure about that though (I am sure about the printed manuals). The printed version may have had what you were looking for this time, but next time you may not be so lucky.

Regards,
Steve