AVR ONE on Sale at reduced price

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Your thread: "Atmel misses the boat yet again ?" has been removed

Last Edited: Wed. Mar 21, 2012 - 07:18 PM
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Do I need yet one more debugger? :-)

John Samperi

Ampertronics Pty. Ltd.

www.ampertronics.com.au

* Electronic Design * Custom Products * Contract Assembly

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You do, listen to the voice in your head :-)

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Interesting indeed!

If I am currently using a Dragon on 8-bit AVRs (typically any ATmegaX8 and AT90USB1287), and do not plan to move up to the 32-bit AVRs, what will the AVR ONE give me that I don't have?

I had a look at the product pages but the tech specs does not tell the nitty-gritty AFAICT. Any users here with opinions?

(I'm in gadget aquisition mode, and I thought that it would be a FriendlyARM kit but a sale is a sale!)

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"Some questions have no answers."[C Baird] "There comes a point where the spoon-feeding has to stop and the independent thinking has to start." [C Lawson] "There are always ways to disagree, without being disagreeable."[E Weddington] "Words represent concepts. Use the wrong words, communicate the wrong concept." [J Morin] "Persistence only goes so far if you set yourself up for failure." [Kartman]

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If you bought one for $600 last week and it is now $200 this week exactly how "ripped off" do you feel now? ;-)

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Sounds unresistable.
Is there any reason why they lowered the price to its original 1/3?

Will it get no further support?

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I think a SAM ICE programmer is a much better investment if you already have good development tools for the 8 bit AVRs.

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I would love to see a special on the JTAG MKII myself

I would rather attempt something great and fail, than attempt nothing and succeed - Fortune Cookie

 

"The critical shortage here is not stuff, but time." - Johan Ekdahl

 

"Step N is required before you can do step N+1!" - ka7ehk

 

"If you want a career with a known path - become an undertaker. Dead people don't sue!" - Kartman

"Why is there a "Highway to Hell" and only a "Stairway to Heaven"? A prediction of the expected traffic load?"  - Lee "theusch"

 

Speak sweetly. It makes your words easier to digest when at a later date you have to eat them ;-)  - Source Unknown

Please Read: Code-of-Conduct

Atmel Studio6.2/AS7, DipTrace, Quartus, MPLAB, RSLogix user

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Quote:

I would love to see a special on the JTAG MKII myself

But the AVR One! is superior in every sense and currently $100 less than a JTAGICEmkII - why wouldn't you simply buy the One! ? In fact I wonder how many people reading that site are going to realise? They may see the mkII as the most expensive of all the debuggers and mistakenly believe it must be the one to have. It also, presumably will not be clear why you'd buy the One! in preference to the similarly priced ICE3 either.

(wonder what Digikey ($622) make of their own supplier undercutting them by so much ? ;-))

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WEll it's not high on my list of priorities at the moment so pardon my ignorance.

I would rather attempt something great and fail, than attempt nothing and succeed - Fortune Cookie

 

"The critical shortage here is not stuff, but time." - Johan Ekdahl

 

"Step N is required before you can do step N+1!" - ka7ehk

 

"If you want a career with a known path - become an undertaker. Dead people don't sue!" - Kartman

"Why is there a "Highway to Hell" and only a "Stairway to Heaven"? A prediction of the expected traffic load?"  - Lee "theusch"

 

Speak sweetly. It makes your words easier to digest when at a later date you have to eat them ;-)  - Source Unknown

Please Read: Code-of-Conduct

Atmel Studio6.2/AS7, DipTrace, Quartus, MPLAB, RSLogix user

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I could not resist, just ordered mine.
I used to have a mcuzone jtage ice mk2 clone.

The fw updates for that always lagged behind the official tools. Although it did not take them months, only 1-2 weeks max.

As I am developing a FreeRtos system, I think this will be a good tool to help me find some nasty bugs, if there ever will be some.

I hope they will not lower their prices again. If the jtagice3 had been reduced to half its price, I probably would have bought that. But for now, I can't wait to put my hands on this as soon as it arrives.

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I love the "High Quality Atmel's Tools" topics. Just cannot stop myself!!!

Quote:
Is there any reason why they lowered the price to its original 1/3?

Because the ship is sinking?

Quote:
wonder what Digikey ($622) make of their own supplier undercutting them by so much ?

Indeed, does anyone know the rules of digikey in that matter?

Quote:
I hope they will not lower their prices again.

You are so Polish.
Quote:

"If you bought one for $600 last week and it is now $200 this week exactly how "ripped off" do you feel now?"

Hmm, anybody with such experiences? Perhaps a return would ease your pain.

No RSTDISBL, no fun!

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I have 3 jtagmkiis here that probably need those little tvs transplants. I wish Dean or Eric or someone would write a little jtag dignostic that would let you plug a jumper cap to the jtag plug and wiggle all the pins. They wont detect a target, so I think the miso line is shorted. I'd pay $50 to have one fixed. That's cheaper than laying out another $299. I think Arrow sold all the ones that were on special for $199.

Imagecraft compiler user

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Quote:

Because the ship is sinking?

Because they weren't selling, due to the popularity of the JTAG-ICE3 I suspect.

Quote:

I wish Dean or Eric or someone would write a little jtag dignostic that would let you plug a jumper cap to the jtag plug and wiggle all the pins.

Ironically enough the AVR-ONE! comes with just such a function - but the schematics of the tools are only available in the Tools department, so ever I can't access them to be able to load my own firmware.

- Dean :twisted:

Make Atmel Studio better with my free extensions. Open source and feedback welcome!

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The only thing that bothers me is that those MICTOR-38 headers are damn expensive. I think I'll just make myself an adapter, so I can use some cheaper header on my future designs.

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I'm still wondering about the advantages of the AVR ONE...

As of January 15, 2018, Site fix-up work has begun! Now do your part and report any bugs or deficiencies here

No guarantees, but if we don't report problems they won't get much of  a chance to be fixed! Details/discussions at link given just above.

 

"Some questions have no answers."[C Baird] "There comes a point where the spoon-feeding has to stop and the independent thinking has to start." [C Lawson] "There are always ways to disagree, without being disagreeable."[E Weddington] "Words represent concepts. Use the wrong words, communicate the wrong concept." [J Morin] "Persistence only goes so far if you set yourself up for failure." [Kartman]

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Quote:

I'm still wondering about the advantages of the AVR ONE...

Keeping in mind this is my personal opinion, and not that of my employer, etc.:

PROS:
1) It's made of metal. You can use it to bludgeon pidgeons to death if you get hungry.
2) It comes with a self-test jig to ensure it is working correctly
3) On AVR32 devices, it can do tracing as well as normal debugging, so you can see the call stack and get a full stack-trace
4) Nexus port interface for high speed AVR32 debugging
5) Fast operation on all programming protocols

CONS:
1) Requries an external power supply, which was a little annoying for me back with my old desk; for most people, this won't matter
2) The JTAG port connector is surface mount, and I managed to sheer mine off by having my target board fall off the table (expensive, but replaceable)

Essentially, it's equally as good as a JTAG-ICE3, but has some extra features for the AVR32 devices. If you're AVR8 only, then choose whichever sounds better.

- Dean :twisted:

Make Atmel Studio better with my free extensions. Open source and feedback welcome!

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Ok I'm convinced. I DON'T need ONE! :-)

John Samperi

Ampertronics Pty. Ltd.

www.ampertronics.com.au

* Electronic Design * Custom Products * Contract Assembly

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Your thread: "Atmel misses the boat yet again ?" has been removed

Last Edited: Wed. Mar 21, 2012 - 07:18 PM
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abcminiuser wrote:
3) On AVR32 devices, it can do tracing as well as normal debugging,

A (real-time) tracing dongles were always an expensive stuff. Targeted for profe$$ionals only.
abcminiuser wrote:
Because they weren't selling, due to the popularity of the JTAG-ICE3 I suspect.

I am sure Atmel's marketing guys are not that short-minded to know this leads to a self-spinning process which ends up with:
Quote:
Because they weren't selling, due to the popularity of AVR ONE! I suspect.

It is hard to believe it is asterisk-free..

My point is that Atmel must have had a good reason to make such decision.

Dean, come on! You must know something!

Mcuzone? You naughty boys!

No RSTDISBL, no fun!

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@js

Another reason to buy the AVR ONE over let's say JTAG ICEMK2 or ICE3, is the automatic detection of daisy chain coupled devices.

Further more the ONE has daisy chain debug support, where as the ICE MK2 only debugs the first device (bug), and it is much faster to debug.

For my purpose I would buy an AVR ONE if I didn't have one. While AVR Studio 5.1 - 6 - x is still missing some vital issues on jtag daisy chain the ICE3 is not supported by AVR Studio 4. That leaves one with the choice of either AVR ONE or JTAG ICE MK2.

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Quote:
Another reason to buy the AVR ONE over let's say JTAG ICEMK2
I already have a JTAG Mk2
Quote:
ICE3
Only works with Studio 5 which I don't have\don't want at the moment. :-)
Quote:
detection of daisy chain coupled devices.
Never used in 12 years, not likely to use in the next 12. (hmm I'd be happy enough to even work with a PIC in 12 years time :lol: )

John Samperi

Ampertronics Pty. Ltd.

www.ampertronics.com.au

* Electronic Design * Custom Products * Contract Assembly

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Do I get it right if I say that the AVR ONE only supports AVRs (and not e.g. Atmels Cortex-M series)? Kinda suggested by the name, but just want to be sure..

As of January 15, 2018, Site fix-up work has begun! Now do your part and report any bugs or deficiencies here

No guarantees, but if we don't report problems they won't get much of  a chance to be fixed! Details/discussions at link given just above.

 

"Some questions have no answers."[C Baird] "There comes a point where the spoon-feeding has to stop and the independent thinking has to start." [C Lawson] "There are always ways to disagree, without being disagreeable."[E Weddington] "Words represent concepts. Use the wrong words, communicate the wrong concept." [J Morin] "Persistence only goes so far if you set yourself up for failure." [Kartman]

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Quote:

Do I get it right if I say that the AVR ONE only supports AVRs (and not e.g. Atmels Cortex-M series)? Kinda suggested by the name, but just want to be sure..

Yes, although the hardware shouldn't limit that AFAIK as it's just a great big honking FPGA connected to a USB interface.

Incidentally, I've got some "insider information" regarding this:

Quote:
We are performing a live test of the discount functionality of the web-store. From what we can tell, it’s working perfectly well.

The discount also applies to the EVK1100 and EVK1101. I can see nobody discovered that yet.

So no big conspiracy after all.

- Dean :twisted:

Make Atmel Studio better with my free extensions. Open source and feedback welcome!

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OK, that was very informative Dean.

(Pity the AVR ONE isnt an "Atmel ONE" then. That could have taken my Cortex-M3 excursions down Atmel Alley if I could get one programmer/OCD dongle for both them and AVRs. As it stands now I'll manage with my Dragons and go for other M3's, with low-cost programmer/OCD.)

As of January 15, 2018, Site fix-up work has begun! Now do your part and report any bugs or deficiencies here

No guarantees, but if we don't report problems they won't get much of  a chance to be fixed! Details/discussions at link given just above.

 

"Some questions have no answers."[C Baird] "There comes a point where the spoon-feeding has to stop and the independent thinking has to start." [C Lawson] "There are always ways to disagree, without being disagreeable."[E Weddington] "Words represent concepts. Use the wrong words, communicate the wrong concept." [J Morin] "Persistence only goes so far if you set yourself up for failure." [Kartman]

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Quote:
I can see nobody discovered that yet.

Dunno about anyone else but I noticed that but thought it was of little / no interest to anyone using AVR8s.

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I have just been told the following verbatim on this:

Quote:
Yes, you can confirm that we are working on adding SAM3 and SAM4 support to the debuggers, but the the current discount has nothing to do with that upgrade with is still months away.

So while not immediate, it looks like the "AVR ONE!" might just become the "Atmel ONE!" after all. You heard it here first people!

- Dean :twisted:

Make Atmel Studio better with my free extensions. Open source and feedback welcome!

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Quote:

we are working on adding SAM3 and SAM4

Quite interesting, and thank you for digging this out Dean!

As of January 15, 2018, Site fix-up work has begun! Now do your part and report any bugs or deficiencies here

No guarantees, but if we don't report problems they won't get much of  a chance to be fixed! Details/discussions at link given just above.

 

"Some questions have no answers."[C Baird] "There comes a point where the spoon-feeding has to stop and the independent thinking has to start." [C Lawson] "There are always ways to disagree, without being disagreeable."[E Weddington] "Words represent concepts. Use the wrong words, communicate the wrong concept." [J Morin] "Persistence only goes so far if you set yourself up for failure." [Kartman]

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Quote:
Yes, you can confirm that we are working on adding SAM3 and SAM4 support to the debuggers

Atmel ONE is a tracing dongle, but do SAM3 and SAM4 have any tracing interface? AFAIK only SAM9 includes those features so I guess Atmel is thinking about adding a debugging and/or programming support, but not tracing.
Both programming and debugging are well supported on nonAtmel's - cheaper and faster dongles.

No RSTDISBL, no fun!

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Quote:

but do SAM3 and SAM4 have any tracing interface?

I just picked a datasheet for a 16K SAM3N which seems to reflect the complete SAM3 range:
Quote:
11.1 Description
The SAM3 Series Microcontrollers feature a number of complementary debug and test capabilities. The Serial Wire/JTAG Debug Port (SWJ-DP) combining a Serial Wire Debug Port (SW-DP) and JTAG Debug(JTAG-DP) port is used for standard debugging functions, such as downloading code and single-stepping through programs. It also embeds a serial wire trace.

11.2 Embedded Characteristics
• Debug access to all memory and registers in the system, including Cortex-M3 register bank when the core is running, halted, or held in reset.
• Serial Wire Debug Port (SW-DP) and Serial Wire JTAG Debug Port (SWJ-DP) debug access
• Flash Patch and Breakpoint (FPB) unit for implementing breakpoints and code patches
• Data Watchpoint and Trace (DWT) unit for implementing watchpoints, data tracing, and system profiling
• Instrumentation Trace Macrocell (ITM) for support of printf style debugging
• IEEE1149.1 JTAG Boundary-can on All Digital Pins


The "printf style" debugging sounds nice ;-)

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clawson wrote:
The "printf style" debugging sounds nice

I had visited Lauterbach stand on Embedded World yesterday. You would not consider a printf style debugging "nice" when compared to a tracing capabilities of the dongles they sell..

I would say the relationship between tracing vs debugging capabilities/usefulness is very close to the relationship between debugging vs programming.

printf style debugging == no fun.

No RSTDISBL, no fun!

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Quote:
tracing capabilities of the dongles
Pardon my ignorance - but what do they trace and why would I want one? (Yes, I know about lmgtfy.com, but why google if there is avrfreaks?) I am a printf guy. Well, may not printf per se exactly, but debugging-over-uart-kind-of guy, with my own little debugging layer allowing me to access any variable and watch them as they change. I rarely use my JTAGICE mkII or Dragon. Pretty much the only time that I might use them if there is no way to do a printf (no hardware UART, no extra pins to do softuart, no flash left for any print - it has been long time since I had a project like that). So, do I really need a tracing dongle, whatever that is?

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Quote:
tracing dongle, whatever that is?
The last time I used a tracing debugger was about 25+ years ago and it costed about the same as the average house. :shock:

It was was for the NSC800, C/W 2 x 52Kbytes 8" disks, one for the O/S and one for the debugger.

It basically records the last number of instructions executed according to buffer size, maybe 256, 512 or more, so you know where the processor has been when a crash happens.

John Samperi

Ampertronics Pty. Ltd.

www.ampertronics.com.au

* Electronic Design * Custom Products * Contract Assembly

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ezharkov wrote:
... but what do they trace and why would I want one?
ARM: CoreSight (on-chip debug and trace)
AVR32 UC3: AVR32UC Technical Reference Manual, go to 9.1.2.6 Program and Data Trace on page 89.
MIPS: PDTrace.
Can be used to search for hardware bugs like this:
What’s the state of your Cortex? by Miro Samek.
Race condition diagnosis; a user says it happens "When I look cross-ways at it" ;-)
Went on one bug hunt that depended on when a hardware signal was generated w.r.t. the program counter's value.
ezharkov wrote:
So, do I really need a tracing dongle, whatever that is?
These are rarely used but are sometimes essential. Worked for one company that would rent the expensive tools from a test equipment rental company.

"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

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Quote:

I had visited Lauterbach stand on Embedded World yesterday. You would not consider a printf style debugging "nice" when compared to a tracing capabilities of the dongles they sell..

Oh yes I love Lauterbach. We exchanged a number of our ARM Multi-ICE in favour of using Lauterbach because of the extra facilities they offer. They also have "Linux awareness" in the debugger which is nice for any kind of Linux work.
Quote:

So, do I really need a tracing dongle, whatever that is?

It's like all "tools" it's down to preference. A lot of people (I'm one) think a logic analyser is invaluable when working in programmable digital electronics - others just wouldn't see the point. Another example: when I've worked on USB we've hired a USB protocol analyser. One could have done things like this the "hard way" but having the right tool for the job is "nice".

So a debugger with a trace unit not only allows the usual JTAG like behaviour of breakpoints, single-stepping, register/memory inspection and so on but you get a buffer that shows all the recent opcodes that got you to where you are now. If you have a common routine called from 100 different places that is causing grief on one particular invocation then rather than peperring the code with printf()s saying "calling foo from func1", "calling foo from func2" and so on to try and trace which one is calling it in error. You just set up the break condition then look at the trace to see where the call came from.

Actually even this is not a great example because any decent debugger (but not Atmel/AVR debuggers) will always offer a stack backtrace anyway so you can see the sequence of CALLs that got you into the routine where the error occurs. But a trace unit would show you even if the code JMPd there. One fairly common use of JMP is in interrupt vector tables.

So say you have 50 unused vectors all mapping to a bad_interrupt() routine and you know one of them is firing in error but not which one? You could write 50 different ISR()s, one for each vector to catch which one was getting you there. Or you could use a code trace to see how you got to bad_interrupt.

I think, like so many tools, it's one of those things you just have to use a bit to see the real benefit of.

BTW the printf thing I mentioned previously (as seen in LPCXpresso by the way) simply means that printf()s in the code route over the sme JTAG-like wire/interface back to the PC and are shown in the debugger. So you don't need to configure UA, use it's pins, find a USB-RS232, tie up another USB on your PC and run some additional terminal software. The whole thing just happens in the debugger for "no cost". In the code (certainly in the Xpresso case) you really can write:

int main(void) { 
  printf("hello world");
}

and when you debug this "hello world" appears in one of the windows of the debugger.

Personally I still claim this is "fun". ;-)

(BTW a lot of the more advanced s/w engineering tools (like trace) only really come into their own when debugging very complex software systems: MB of code, 1,000's of source files, 100's of threads and so on - on something as simple as an AVR they could well be considered over-kill).

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ezharkov wrote:
I rarely use my JTAGICE mkII or Dragon.

Well, my experience here tells me that most people do not even understand the difference between a programming dongle and debugging dongle. And thus I would not expect the freaks to understand the difference between a tracing dongle and a debugging or programming dongle. Especially in the context of this 8-bit forum.

AVR ONE is a tool which has many purposes:
You can for example use it as a nice stand for a cup of coffee,
or as Dean stated:

abcminiuser wrote:
You can use it to bludgeon pidgeons to death if you get hungry.

I suppose you could even make other stupid things with it, for example pay (then) 599$ and do only ISP programming with it.

This swiss-army-knife is a 200MHz tracing dongle (which also supports debugging and programming of course).

Why would you need a tracing dongle? First of all if you do not need a debugging dongle, then I am sure a tracing dongle is of no use in your job. Second thing is that some chips do not support tracing and some do not even support debugging.

Quote:
what do they trace and why would I want one?

These trace (log) selected states of the core. Not necessarily the program flow, but also data busses/threads/cores etc.

No RSTDISBL, no fun!

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clawson wrote:
BTW the printf thing I mentioned previously

With ARMs it is called a semihosting and AVRs also have ~these capabilities implemented:
https://www.avrfreaks.net/index.p...

No RSTDISBL, no fun!

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clawson wrote:
BTW a lot of the more advanced s/w engineering tools (like trace) only really come into their own when debugging very complex software systems: ...
Worked on one dual 8-bit system (tightly coupled) where tracing was very handy. Also, it can be used on systems of one MPU/MCU communicating with complex programmable logic (ASIC, FPGA, etc.).

"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

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gchapman wrote:
Worked on one dual 8-bit system (tightly coupled) where tracing was very handy.
Would not something like a logic analyzer be as handy in this case?

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Yes in that case because the programs were stored in and fetched from external memories and some older logic analyzers had machine code instruction decoders.
But that system had custom tracers.

"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

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The ultimate is a deep buffer logic analyser *with* a disassembler built in. When we first designed an 80286 based machine we used an HP1630 to do this and it was a dream to work with. You clipped leads onto all of the address and data bus lines and then ran the code and it would give you a disassembled trace of what just happened (this is long before any kind of ICE were available for the thing).

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Quote:
When we first designed an 80286 based machine we used an HP1630 to do this and it was a dream to work with.

Now you have reminded me my classes during studies where we had an '51 with its data and address bus connected to a logic analyzer. The decoding/disassembling part was made manually from printouts - to get the idea how uC manages program flow.

When you have all of its guts on a table, then yes, in theory you can hook just about any logic analyzer+software to it, actually building your own tracing dongle. The problem is that the trick is close to impossible with integrated uCs - you need to have a dedicated tracing interface to do that.

What I particularly liked with those Lauterbach tracing dongles (the one I have tried was for PPC with Nexus tracing interface) was that you can step forwards and backwards through the program flow. Both low (asm) and high (C/C++) level, watching the variables/jumps/calls/ISRs and timings along the path. And I do not mean the simulation, but real-time logs recorded during interaction with external world.
And a lot more of course.

No RSTDISBL, no fun!

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Quote:

The problem is that the trick is close to impossible with integrated uCs - you need to have a dedicated tracing interface to do that.

Hence Atmel's ICE50 which replaces the chip with a complete simulation of the core. That is a true ICE (because it is really In Circuit in place of the CPU it emulates). All these later devices with ICE in the name (JTAGICE, JTAGICEmkII, JTAGICE3) are not ICE's at all, they are "logic sniffers" operating around the periphery though I guess you could claim that the JTAG module inside the AVR itself is the "in circuit" part of the device?

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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/In-...

Yes, an ICE (or an FPGA emulator) can also be used in development to put the guts outside. But AFAIK this branch of tools became extinct recently.

Ok, not completely:
https://www.avrfreaks.net/index.p...
as it has several advantages over tracing port - you do not need to implement the feature in a release version of a Si.

No RSTDISBL, no fun!

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Hi Everyone,

I ordered one! I used to have a jtagice mkii before I sold it. The flexible cable on it always made me nervous... Even so, I've missed the mkii after I sold it and this looks pretty nice.

What is the deal with the two different probes for it?

Thanks,

Alan

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alank2 wrote:
What is the deal with the two different probes for it?
AVR ONE!, Probe
Looks like the alternate probe adds function with a 5 volt AVR32 UC3C high-speed trace connection.
99USD; better to lose the probe than the entire tool (ESD, power sequencing, follow the instructions).

"Dare to be naïve." - Buckminster Fuller

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Going into details of this device:

http://www.atmel.no/webdoc/avron...
it looks like "generating trace timing signals" is not supported. Does this mean that profiling is not possible actually?

And here is what is inside:
http://www.atmel.no/webdoc/avron...
It has a 128MB FIFO for trace messages and a Hi-Speed USB connection.

No RSTDISBL, no fun!

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Hi,

It arrived today. Other than the finish on it having some rough spots with paint flaking, it seems fine. Passes its self test.

One question though - if I am using a project where the last 2 bytes of flash are a crc16 of the flash, will this flash signature get pushed off when debugging because of breaks or something else it needs to insert in the code?

Thanks,

Alan

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Quote:

One question though - if I am using a project where the last 2 bytes of flash are a crc16 of the flash, will this flash signature get pushed off when debugging because of breaks or something else it needs to insert in the code?

IIRC - and this is pretty shaky - when the JTAG inserts a software breakpoint it replaces an instruction with a BREAK, and then uses JTAG magic to execute the missing instruction when the breakpoint is hit. In any case, no, debugging will not move the contents of FLASH unless you're compiling it incorrectly.

- Dean :twisted:

Make Atmel Studio better with my free extensions. Open source and feedback welcome!

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Hi Dean,

abcminiuser wrote:
IIRC - and this is pretty shaky - when the JTAG inserts a software breakpoint it replaces an instruction with a BREAK, and then uses JTAG magic to execute the missing instruction when the breakpoint is hit. In any case, no, debugging will not move the contents of FLASH unless you're compiling it incorrectly.- Dean :twisted:

My crc only goes into the hex file - perhaps that is the issue. Is the ELF or something else used for debugging?

p.s. I'm surprised they didn't put any rubber legs on it!

Thanks,

Alan

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Quote:

My crc only goes into the hex file - perhaps that is the issue. Is the ELF or something else used for debugging?

Yes, the ELF file is the one used for debugging, as it contains both the binary code for the application and references to the source code for source level debugging.

- Dean :twisted:

Make Atmel Studio better with my free extensions. Open source and feedback welcome!

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