AVR Avaliability in Australia?

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#1
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Hey guys,

I know this topic has been done to death, but I really need the info. I live in Melbourne, Victoria, Australia and I need to be able to purchase the "larger" micros (at least 16k of flash) instead of the tiny and old 8535's that Dick Smith and Jaycar (my local electronics stores) offer. Does anyone know a place (online or close to the city) where I can purchase several of these AVR's for the cheapest price possible? It's going to be used in a commercial product, so the econimics have to be good.

Theres only the 8535, 8515 and another tiny AVR avaliable in the stores I know.

- Dean :twisted:

Make Atmel Studio better with my free extensions. Open source and feedback welcome!

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Hi

Have use Futurlec before & their prices are pretty good.
Some how if you go to their URL http://www.futurlec.com/
Maybe, there is a link to Australia.
The only way I did manage to get a price listing that I emailed to the URL above & they redirected to Australia branch.

Futurlec
2 / 136 Broadmeadow Rd,
Broadmeadow,
NSW 2292
Phone No.: I don't have
Fax No.: 02 49 62 3231

or

http://www.dontronics.com/
Gold Coast Qld

Regards
Ken

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Hi,

Another supplier is Polykom which used to be www.polykom.com but it has just changed to www.soanarplus.com. You can order on line and their stock is in Sydney and comes overnight to Melbourne. The range of stock varies and lead times can often be long. I have used them for Mega8, Mega161 and Mega128.

Regards

Charles

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i think jaycar stocks the mega16 now, but like all their other stuff is way overpriced. I get all my stuff from futurlec, they are pretty cheap, good range, good service and fast. Compare the jaycar or DSE price on a 2x16 backlit lcd to futurlec and you will be shocked! You can buy about 4 from futurlec compared to 1 from the other guys.
there aus site is at www.futurlec.com.au

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I know Dontronics is ok from experience, but futurelec seems to be the go: $8 for an ATMEGA16!!! My emplyer will be happy, that'll drive down the cost of the system no end. Does futurelec deliver to melbourne for cheap?

Make Atmel Studio better with my free extensions. Open source and feedback welcome!

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Australia and New Zealand

Standard Post
For orders up to AUD$49, Postage is AUD$4.00.
For orders AUD$50 to AUD$99, Postage is AUD$7.00
For order AUD$100 to AUD$199, Postage is AUD$15.00
For order AUD$200 and above, Postage is AUD$20.00

Express Post
For orders up to AUD$49, Delivery is AUD$15.00.
For order AUD$50 and AUD$99, Delivery is AUS$30.00
For order AUD$100 and above, Delivery is AUD$50.00

Courier
For orders up to AUD$49, Delivery - AUD$30.00.
For order AUD$50 and AUD$99, Delivery - AUS$50.00
For order AUD$100 and above, Delivery - AUD$80.00

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We generally use Digikey. It may seem pricey for one-off parts, but the advantage is that they stock a massive range of parts and the price comes down fast once you start ordering larger quantities. They will also ship using United States Postal Service which is not too expensive compared to places that will only ship via Fed-Ex or UPS ($$$!)

e.g. Digikey order for an ATMega16

ATMega16 - 16MHz TQFP
Price Break Unit Price
1 6.45000
25 4.05000
100 3.75000

United States Postal Service Global Express Mail $18.00 - $32.00 5-10 days

Digikey currently stock most of the AVR range and "new" items like the various flavours of the ATtiny13, ATmega48 and the ATmega88 (has an inventory entry, but no stock).

The Digikey website is simple, fast and easy to search on, and you don't have to deal with annoying salespeople who want to know how many thousands of parts you are going to buy in the future if you just want to purchase a few parts for "research and development"

Then again, I'm lucky that I work for a company that regularly puts in Digikey orders, so I'm able to add my own parts to the list. ;)

Just my 2cents.

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Memec...

http://www.unique.au.memec.com/

Cheers
Dave.

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I think i'll go with futurlec, as an AU$4 delivery/postage is exceptional, when you factor in that an ATMEGA16 from Jaycar is $25 ea...

I was using a special AT90S8535 board with onboard MAX232 and power supply (AU$50) for my original design in the project i'm doing, but i've run out of the 8K flash space. Can anyone suggest an ATMEL micro that has at least 3 full ports (of 8 I/O each), min 128 bytes EEPROM and SRAM, and a minimum of 16K RAM? I thought the MEGA16 would be the best, but I want the cheapest.

- Dean :twisted:

Make Atmel Studio better with my free extensions. Open source and feedback welcome!

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Hmmm, Futurlec lists a 16x2 LCD (with backlight) as AU$10.51. Two weeks ago I bought one from Dick Smith for AU$30 :evil: . Seems like a good site, but their "KWh Meter" was "comming soon" in April 2003.....

Make Atmel Studio better with my free extensions. Open source and feedback welcome!

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yep, thats one drawback to futurlec, the website is hardly ever updated. Just send an email to them and they will respond very quickly, even if something is not listed on their site, they may actualy have it. Have a look at the american site (drop the .au) they have other stuff their too which you can get here, eg they do accept eagle format here for pcb manufacture.

as for a chip for your project, well, the mega32 looks good, futurlec have a mega32 control board for $46 or mega32 for $10.51
http://www.futurlec.com.au/ATMeg...
which i reckon is a good price for what its got and if you are using it for development, it is much easier than stuffing around with a breadboard or vero board. They also have a mega163 board which i have bought and found to be good, i think the mega163 will also satisy your requirements, it has 16k of flash. 8k of flash is a fair sized program, is your coding efficient? What is the project you are working on?

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(Cringes in advance) I use BASCOM. It's (and my) code is not exactly efficient, but I already use Visual Basic - so know than language - and it already has all the relevant drivers inbuilt. I am yet to find a simple and elegant C program, and the one kicker:

My employees own a chemical mixing company. They can do ANYTHING with analogue electronics, but have not used micros before. I'm using BASCOM as a good introduction, as the code I write is (theoretically) understandable by them. BASCOM is great for readability and quick for changes, so i'd rather pay $2 more for a bigger micro (than the 8535) and keep the easy code.

- Dean :twisted:

Make Atmel Studio better with my free extensions. Open source and feedback welcome!

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Hi Dean

I was just browsing through the http://groups.yahoo.com/group "ABCboardshotchip" & came a cross your message as in quoted below. It was very disapointing that you have not aknowledged the people who had helped you. But in future give credit to them. I don't mind if you pass on details for cheapness (I am all for it) but it is us that put you on the right path.

Quote:

http://groups.yahoo.com/group/AB...

Message 1022

From: "Dean Camera"
Date: Tue Nov 23, 2004 1:40 pm
Subject: Cheap LCD Prices

Hey guys,

Just came across a NSW company called Futurlec that offers the BEST
prices on many usefull components, LCDs included. For approx $4 they
post all over Australia.

The thing that caught my eye was the 16x2 Backlit LCDs. I just bought
one from Dick Smith for $30, but they have them listed for $10.57.
Bit of a saving? They also have bare microcontrollers, such as the
ATMEGA16 for about $8.

Can anyone beat these prices?

The address is http://www.futurlec.com.au/ - they don't update the
site much, but at those prices, who's complaining?

- Dean

Ken E

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I dont really understand your previous post dean.
Sure, bascom is good for getting things going quickly,
but what do you actually learn? I mean do you have any
idea on how writing to and LCD or I2C is actually done?
Why would you write sloppy code just for the ease of it
in a commercial app? Why not do it properly from the start and avoid
all the bugs with crap code.
I am guessing that if you went to an employer with visual
basic on your resume, they wont take much notice (perhaps even
laugh), so why not
learn industry standard languages from the start. C code
is equally as readable as basic, i mean for all the things you
are prob using at the moment, loops, if's and that sort of thing.
You said "rather pay $2 more for a bigger micro (than the 8535)
and keep the easy code." What happens in the future if you want
to build a million of these things, does your employer wat to pay
2 million extra for your laziness? I think not. I am not saying
that bascom is a bad tool (i cant say if the programs it makes
are bigger, but i am guessing they are), but you should always be
trying your hardest to make things the best you can, especially
in a commercial environment because thats how you get your
next job. In you previous posts, you have mentioned
a number of jobs for this 'chemical company'. have any of these
been completed? were they happy with the result?
I work in the manufacturing industry, and we just buy whatever is needed
to do the job, because you are guaranteed it will work, you will find that
custom solutions are not always required, or the best. Particularly in a factory,
you can pretty much buy whatever is required (just go to www.ab.com), unless
they company is not that large and has access to people with necessary skills
to do the job (not likely). So i guess what i am saying, dont reinvent the wheel
unless you really have to.

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rcd, try and remember that Dean is but a youngster. A rather ambitious one at that. I totally admire his enthusiasm and I can see since he has been on this board he has been learning real fast.

I'm sure before long he will be jumping into the depths of C programming, and doing it well.

Keep up the good work dean, good to see another aussie on the boards.

oddbudman
brisvegas (brisbane)

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Ok, this people bashing is getting on my nerves. It seems that for every question I ask, there are two good replies, and ten putdowns. The specifications - USING BASCOM - is OUT OF MY CONTROL, and I have been INSTRUCTED to use it BY MY EMPLOYERS. THEY are the ones working out the ecomonics, NOT ME.

The nuber of posts I placed on the forum are about the same project, It was delayed due to a number of issues, one being a lack of help from the people from this forum. I sincearly (although I can spell the word) apologize to all the people who have helped me, and am happy that i've helped others, but this bashing really has to stop. Can people ignore the other issues and get back on track?

- Dean :twisted:

Make Atmel Studio better with my free extensions. Open source and feedback welcome!

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oddbudman, you've hit the nail right on the head. By the way, I do hope you pic is a fog machine....

But I digress. I think i'll use the Futurlec - and I'll put an append post, i'm sorry I didn't "quote the source" (words of my SOSE teacher) - they seems to be the best, especially as the final product is rather situation-specific and will probably sell a maximum of 50 units @ approx $150-$200 australia.

Thanks for the help!
- Dean :twisted:

Make Atmel Studio better with my free extensions. Open source and feedback welcome!

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One more question: are the pins on the Futurlec 16x2 LCD screens SIL or DIL? I like the single row of 14-16 pins much better than the two rows of 6-8, a la Jaycar.

- Dean :twisted:

Make Atmel Studio better with my free extensions. Open source and feedback welcome!

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abcminiuser wrote:
One more question: are the pins on the Futurlec 16x2 LCD screens SIL or DIL? I like the single row of 14-16 pins much better than the two rows of 6-8, a la Jaycar.

- Dean :twisted:


I'm sure Futurlec knows the answer for this question and will be happy to give you the answer if you ask them.

But you could also just check their American website, it took me less than 30 seconds to find the answer:
http://www.futurlec.com/LED/LCD1...

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Dean,

just a note on LCD pinouts.

THe advantage of DIL connectors is that you can use standard IDC headers and cable to connnect the LCD to the board if the LCD is mounted on the chassis. 14/16 pin SIL headers are prone to having the end wires break if you assemble and reaasemble a few times. DIL are definetly much more robust than SIL. SIL is OK if you have desinged your project so the PCB is attached to the front panel and then the LCD can plug straight into the PCB but all other scenarios DIL is superior.

Lachlan

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Geez look at all of us Brisbane ppl!
We should have a AVRfreaks drinks or something :)

Tthere are some pretty good C libraries out. I even found code for the STA013 mo3 decoder in the AVRLIB compilation. Now that is going to save some time (I hope).

BTW, does anyone know where to source an ATMega32L at a decent price in Australia?

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I've had to debug several C programs in my life. Most programmers are well meaning and hard working, but when they can't get the 'goofiness' out of the final result, they despirately turn my way.

Expecting re-entrant function variables to hold their contents between calls is one of the biggest flops. To my knowledge, no C compiler ever catches these. However, my high school Wat5 Fortran compiler caught it every time back in 1976 (IBM 360 - before C).

The microcontroller world seems to be divided between the world of BASIC and C. There are also kooks like me who dive into machine code for lack of memory. I see BASCOM-AVR as a good way to hybrid in machine code while keeping it understandable.

I also find it harder to hide important code in BASCOM, as it's commonly done in C header files for job security reasons. Just try finding out were the 'putlcdxx()' function is going when you can't find a reference in the main listing...

Formerly ran the business AVRProject.com

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Thanks for the info on LCD displays. I think that the IDC way is the best (though I have no objections to the SIL). The only reason I prefer SIL is that it it easier to directly plug into a broadboard (without cables).

Anywho, I still prefer BASCOM, though might delve into C in the future. BASCOM keeps the code readable as mentioned. It's code may be slightly larger than the equivelent C or ASM, but for ease of use it can be a good trade off. The only difficulty is making your own library functions. While you can make a .BAS with the funtions and just include with BASCOM, the actual libraries are neigh indecypherable, using mixes of ASM, BASIC and oddball scripting.

BASCOM is great for prototyping, or just getting a program to work. When it's for a one-off or hobby project, there's no need to keep the cost to an absolute minimum. It can also be good for commercial projects (ex. video, etc.) when code size is reasonably small or space not an issue. With BASCOM, you can create a webserver in only a few lines (max 4 simultaneous TCP/IP sockets) - try doing the same in C or ASM!

- Dean :twisted:

Make Atmel Studio better with my free extensions. Open source and feedback welcome!