AVR and EMC

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Hi there,

I use to work with different micros like AVR, NEC, PIC, MSP430 and these days a new project may be done using a freescale micro for the first time. Personally I like AVR micros but we try to choose the better micro for each project. Each time we have a conversation with a distibutor they are trying of course to promote the micro that they sell, but everyone tells that AVR has the worst micros because of their bad EMC characteristics. Usually they say "Why ATMEL isn't in the automotive area?"

Is that real???

Thanks,
Michael.

Michael.

User of:
IAR Embedded Workbench C/C++ Compiler
Altium Designer

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Quote:
Usually they say "Why ATMEL isn't in the automotive area?"

Considering that Atmel sells CAN versions of their AVRs specifically for automotive use, I would say this is an outright lie.

Regards,
Steve A.

The Board helps those that help themselves.

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Quote:

Usually they say "Why ATMEL isn't in the automotive area?"

http://www.atmel.com/products/au...\
and/or www.atmel.com and click on the big Automotive link.

Good 'ol PICs were pretty tough from what I have heard. And some Motos. But is the same true for current generations? From my amateur knowledge, in general chip feature sizes have been getting smaller; that gives us more chip for the $, and in general the small feature sizes can make a chip more susceptible to noise. We've got many, many industrial apps without noise problems--unless you don't do proper noise protection for inductive kickback and motor drives and such, where you can see many, many V spikes on Gnd & signals & Vcc & etc.

Lee

You can put lipstick on a pig, but it is still a pig.

I've never met a pig I didn't like, as long as you have some salt and pepper.

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I've done a gadget and gotten it certified for the appropriate emc requiremets, the funnier parts of e-mark (It's on the same bus as the brakes), and the much much tougher requirements of a certain prestige car manufacturer. No it was not a hastily thrown together layout. Yes it passed the first time. No, the TÜV auditor did not think I was a dangerous lunatic (says something about auditors, doesn't it?). Yes it had an AVR in it.

Freescale. I love freescale. I've never ever had any kinds of particularly nasty emissions from their choice of package and pin arrangement, and I've certainly never sat with my face in my hands wondering how to stop ESD from making the thing go looney. And they have no serious bugs, particularly not in the mac-phy parts. In which markets were you competing with me again*?
The Mcores do have mighty nice program/debug interfaces at the documentation and pin level though, much, much nicer than what Atmel offers.
On the other hand, if the part in question is cheap enough, the volume high enough, and that can pay for the respins resulting from the using a new micro, why not? The peripherals aren't bad, nor is the instruction set.

(*Irony. Some demographic groups seem to have a problem with it.)

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Freescale. I love freescale.
This is outright blasphemy, the moderator shoud ban KKP for life....and maybe send over some nasty thugs to belt some sense into him. :lol:

John Samperi

Ampertronics Pty. Ltd.

www.ampertronics.com.au

* Electronic Design * Custom Products * Contract Assembly

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Yeah - that's what I heard too. Atmels are just way too loud to use in automotive applications. I've even heard that Atmel's EMC signature is sooooo loud, that it even drowns out the emissions from the spark plugs firing :roll:

Sorry for the light sarcasm.