avr 8 bit microcontroller with ethernet support

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Hi,

Can someone suggest AVR controller compatible to :-- PIC18F67J60 . It have ethernet & DMA support both :?:

http://mightyohm.com/blog/tag/pic18f67j60/

Or some other AVR controller in same cost & feature range :?:

//John

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No AVR8 has Ethernet. Most add a WIZ812MJ

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Unfortunately Atmel has no AVR with built-in Ethernet controller :(

The usual solution is to add an external ENC28J60 or Wiznet chip.

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AVR + WizNet 820 module. Far better than Microchip.

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Does this wiznet chip/module contain the software for making a webserver? I'm assuming it does. I looked around on their website, but this point was not really clear.

Is there an example of using this module with an AVR to make a webserver? How much of the AVR capacity is used by the wiznet module? Is there enough capacity let to run the app (motor, leds,a/d, etc)

I see there is the wiz5300 chip by itself, to allow you to make your own circuit board (rahter than kludging in a module). What does it take to make it into a websever? Does wiznet supply this code in a library?

When in the dark remember-the future looks brighter than ever.   I look forward to being able to predict the future!

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Quote:

Does this wiznet chip/module contain the software for making a webserver?

No, protocol-stack-wise it offers TCP, IP and "downwards". It offers this to the AVR through an SPI or I2C interface IIRC. (A long time since I played around with my Wiznet module). A HTTP implementation would execute in the AVR.

Unless there are very good reasons not to, I would at least consider/look at other MCUs that can do "Ethernet". Things like some Cor[cough-cough]tex-M3 come to mind. For a one off project you can get some nice boards with everything right out to the 10base-T jack, and enough memory and computing power so that it will outrun an 8-bit AVR. Then again, while you can get or put together free tool chains you might think that the software gets more complicated to design and write. YMMV.

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Note that Wiznet's WIZ200WEB shows the 5100 chip that's also at the heart of the WIZ812MJ being used as an HTTP webserver. As Johan says the chip contains code to do TCP/IP then there is a thin layer of AVR code above this that puts the HTTP on top. The code and app notes and so on are downloadable from the Wiznet website.

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clawson wrote:
As Johan says the chip contains code to do TCP/IP then there is a thin layer of AVR code above this that puts the HTTP on top.
The code to implement a web server is simple in theory. After initializing the chip (setting the MAC address, setting or getting via DHCP an IP address) you begin listening on a port (usually port 80) and then sit in a loop that retrieves an HTTP request from a client, parses the request and sends back a response.

You could write the loop to service other hardware requests (or have them be interrupt driven) and as long as you have enough processor time left to get and reply to the HTTP requests you should be fine. The WizNet module doesn't have any provision for content storage so, depending on the complexity of the web server content (and whether it is static or dynamic) you may need other storage.

Don Kinzer
ZBasic Microcontrollers
http://www.zbasic.net

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Quote:

The WizNet module doesn't have any provision for content storage so, depending on the complexity of the web server content (and whether it is static or dynamic) you may need other storage.

This is why the WIZ200WEB also has an HY62256 (32Kx8) SRAM and an AT45DB041D (4Mb) Dataflash on board too. The 512KB of Datflash can hold the "website data" and the 32K RAM acts as a temporary buffer for holding images/pages taken from the flash at any time.

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Any opinion on how this PIC chip would compare?
PIC18F97J60...seems like a one-chip solution. Why doesn't Atmel offer similar AVR?

When in the dark remember-the future looks brighter than ever.   I look forward to being able to predict the future!

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Quote:
Or some other AVR controller in same cost & feature range

PIC18F67J60 is under 3,8$ (digikey, 100 pcs).

Almost all ethernet uCs require adding external PHY (1,5 - 2$). Basic external MAC+PHY costs about 2,5$. PIC18FXXJ60 integrates PHY so you are looking for a 128kB ethernet chip for ~2$ or a 128kB A[cough-cough]VR for ~1$.
Forget it.

No RSTDISBL, no fun!

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Quote:

PIC18F97J60...seems like a one-chip solution.

Is that not just some PIC core and an ENC28J60 (effectively) bolted on inside? You can add an ENC28J60 to any AVR too. However it's the low level electronics, you then have to use a lot of flash to provide the software support (uIp, lwIP etc).

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The code and app notes and so on are downloadable from the Wiznet website.

...do you know if they have code/appnotes specifically for using their chips(s) as a webserver (I don't mean the user manual for one of their webserver modules)?

When in the dark remember-the future looks brighter than ever.   I look forward to being able to predict the future!

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Quote:

..do you know if they have code/appnotes specifically for using their chips(s) as a webserver (I don't mean the user manual for one of their webserver modules)?

Yes I'm saying get their demo source code (.zip) for the WIZ200WEB. It shows how to interface to the W5300 (sorry not W5100 I said above) and implement an HTTP solution in the AVR code complete with a ROM filing system to access the HTML and GIF files in the Dataflash.

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Thanks, I downloaded the WIZ200WEB files, there are quite a few & no real explanations of what's going on, as far as I can tell. Just an endless list of routines. Is there a document (appnote) that describes what's going on? I suppose thats a better question for the Wiznet folks.

When in the dark remember-the future looks brighter than ever.   I look forward to being able to predict the future!

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Quote:

Is there a document (appnote) that describes what's going on?

I speculate that for you to take on any web-server development, coding from scratch on top of an existing TCP layer or using existing code throughout, you will need to understand the HTTP protocol (and several associated standards, e.g. extensions/specifics to HTTP, MIME etc). Fortunately, the "TCP/IP standards", known as RFCs, are among the more readable standards there are.

Start with RFC 2616: http://datatracker.ietf.org/doc/...

As often is the case, the Wikipedia article on the subject is a good first introduction: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/HTTP

As of January 15, 2018, Site fix-up work has begun! Now do your part and report any bugs or deficiencies here

No guarantees, but if we don't report problems they won't get much of  a chance to be fixed! Details/discussions at link given just above.

 

"Some questions have no answers."[C Baird] "There comes a point where the spoon-feeding has to stop and the independent thinking has to start." [C Lawson] "There are always ways to disagree, without being disagreeable."[E Weddington] "Words represent concepts. Use the wrong words, communicate the wrong concept." [J Morin] "Persistence only goes so far if you set yourself up for failure." [Kartman]

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The Arduino "Ethernet Shield" has a wiznet chip and an SD (or microSD) socket for storage. There are a significant number of examples of web-server apps doing Arduino-like things (blinking lights, reading sensors, etc.) The "webserver" example included with the core IDE is about 12k when compiled for a m328. There are also single boards containing both a m328 and a wiznet chip, designed for use as an Arduino.

Even if you hate the whole concept of Arduino, and have no intent on using the Arduino IDE or libraries, their code might be a good starting point.

Quote:
Why doesn't Atmel offer similar AVR?

I'd guess that Atmel's Ethernet design (used on their ARMs, for example) is not compatible with the silicon process used to fab AVRs. Perhaps not with the internal AVR bus Architecture, either.

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I guess they could make it work, but have no valid business case to actually do it.