availability of ATmega2560/2561/1280/1281?

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hello,
does anybody of you know a date when the atmega2560/atmega2561 will be available?

anybody heard about atmega1280/atmega1281? these types are mentioned in jtagice mkii flyer.

regards
gerhard

Last Edited: Thu. Feb 17, 2005 - 08:30 PM
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Not offhand; I know of one person who has gotten a sample of the 2560.

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Quote:
ATmega2561 and ATmega2560 samples are available now. Production will start in 3Q05. ATmega640, ATmega1280 and ATmega1281 will be sampled in 2Q05 with volume production in 4Q05. The ATmega640, ATmega1280 and ATmega2560 come in a 100-pin housing, while the ATmega1281 and ATmega2561 are available in a 64-pin package. Pricing for 10,000 units starts at $4.75 for the ATmega64

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Remember the difference between Atmel time and real time:

RealTime = AtmelTime + Several Months/Years

-Colin

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Hi,

I need some information about the availability of the ATMEGA640 or ATMEGA2560. I am trying to get samples for several weeks with no success. The sample production should have been started in Q2/2005 ?!?!?!? My hardware design is compleatly finished including a prototype PCB. It is only missing the ATMEGA :cry:

Regards

Thomas

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Only build prototype hardware if the parts are batched around you... :wink:

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I have never had problems like this with non Atmel components, especially because there is no information on the Atmel homepage. To me it looks like as if the part is available. This is a very bad behaviour. I use about 5000 controllers a year, but I am really thinking about not to use Atmel in my future designs. I switched to Atmel just about a year ago since it looked like a good idea to me. I guess you are not working on professional designs, since you should know that in most cases you can not wait with the PCB design until you have all components in your hands. The prototypes need to be finished a.s.a.p.

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Hi,
1000 boards a year not professional?
If I use a new part, I first phone to my distri to get a price and a LEADTIME !
Mostly, if there are problems with these parts, you will be warned...

Shortly before finishing the PCB, I order the devices. If you then have a problem with it, you can cancel it by a nighshift with your PCB software....
Shit happens anytime and anyplace....
Try to get samples via your distri...

What happens to you, if these devices would be in production in 1Q2006 (because of some problems perhaps) ?

And with 5000 pieces, it seems, that you'll be not the first to get devices...
I think you have to wait about 2..4 month's until your minimum order can be placed...

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c_oflynn wrote:
Remember the difference between Atmel time and real time:

RealTime = AtmelTime + Several Months/Years

-Colin

...and unlike Microsoft, Atmel uses this time effectivly to iron out as many of the bugs as humanly possible. Seriously, I love ATMEL, and not just because they bribed me with free gear. All these new AVRs are very exciting!

- Dean :twisted:

Make Atmel Studio better with my free extensions. Open source and feedback welcome!

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AVR beats PIC any time (my opinion - don't mean to start another war) but if you go to microchip.com and order samples you get them in no time. Proff or hobbiest.I've tried my luck on Atmels "request sample" order form more than 10 times with several months interval. The only time I had any luck the devices arrived 8 months after i placed the order. On none of the requsts did I get any feedback from Atmel at anytime.
For a semi proff job the bi*ch (excuse me but..!) at Arrow (Error?) (distri in Denmark) wouldn't even talk to me and told me to order samples from the form on Atmels site...

/claus

/claus

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Well, I can't comment there, i'm not big enough to need samples, but I did get a few free AVRs with my free STK500 :D. Not only do AVRs have the best features on the market, code is easily ported from one to another, the IDE is free and the customer service - in the avr@atmel department, apparently not the samples section - is truley mind boggling. I asked Mitsubishi for help with a development board I got (free!) that was based aroudn it - no help. Asked a question to AVR@atmel, a response within a day even though i'm just a lowly teenage hobbyist. ATMEL's my favourite company in the world, and Compaq my least favourite ;).

- Dean :twisted:

Make Atmel Studio better with my free extensions. Open source and feedback welcome!

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I have also had some issues with the ATmega2560, for instance, the WinAVR compiler in combination with AVR studio will not compile code for that processor. I wrote a full header file, but it still doesn't work. Does anyone know a configuration that does?

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The U.S. Digi-Key web site now lists quantity available 224 ATmega2560 chips (they are out of ATmega2560V) and various quantities of TQFP/MLF ATmega2561/2561V chips.

I have never seen any Atmega640/1280/1281 chips in distribution.

I didn't notice how old the original posting was at first. This should prove Colin's ATMEL time formula.

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An FAE I know refers to the Atmel Seminar 2005 tour as the "Broken Promises Tour"..I guess that just about sums it up.....he said do not design it in for production until late 2006. Maybe having some Fab capacity issues....I got samples of tiny2313 more than a year ago and the errata indicates they still have issues with it last time I looked....I just add 1 1/2 years to everything ATmel says to be safe and protect my business .....

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As mentioned, at least selected flavours of 2560/2561 are in the distribution channel.

[Compiler Wars flame bait--I'm ducking]

Quote:

issues with the ATmega2560, for instance, the WinAVR compiler in combination with AVR studio will not compile code for that processor.

AFAIK, CodeVision has full support for that series.

Lee

You can put lipstick on a pig, but it is still a pig.

I've never met a pig I didn't like, as long as you have some salt and pepper.

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theusch wrote:
As mentioned, at least selected flavours of 2560/2561 are in the distribution channel.

[Compiler Wars flame bait--I'm ducking]

Quote:

issues with the ATmega2560, for instance, the WinAVR compiler in combination with AVR studio will not compile code for that processor.

AFAIK, CodeVision has full support for that series.

Lee

The latest patches for GCC add in support for the new large flash micros, the ones with more than 128KB of flash.

- Dean :twisted:

Make Atmel Studio better with my free extensions. Open source and feedback welcome!

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I really can't see the point in them when you can buy an ARM for the same or less money. Then again I often read here how AVRs are the best thing on earth, Atmel is second only to Mother Theresa etc (Is a poll called for)?.

Let the flames begin!

Jim

Your message here - reasonable rates.

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I can see the '256 parts being justified for somebody who's already heavily invested in smaller AVRs and has all the necessary toolset for AVR development, programming, debug, etc. If you bought the right stuff in the first place, then you can continue using it all on the 'mega256x, rather than buying new software, equipment, etc for a different platform.

One of the projects I'm responsible for maintaining actually began life on an ATmega64; feature creep caused it to push the upper limits of an ATmega128 by the time everything stabilized. At this point, if any significant new features were requested (I'm not planning any!) it would be much simpler to move up to an ATmega2561 than it would be to move across to an ARM.

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Quote:

I really can't see the point in them when you can buy an ARM for the same or less money.

Quote:

I can see the '256 parts being justified for somebody who's already heavily invested in smaller AVRs and has all the necessary toolset for AVR development, programming, debug, etc.

As it turns out, a Mega32 and AT91SAM7S32 and Mega64 and AT91SAM7S64 are in about the same package and the same amount of flash. About 6 months ago I posted a rough comparison:
https://www.avrfreaks.net/index.p...

Quote:
A [very rough] comparison between the AT91SAM7S64 and the ATMega64:

--Both have roughly the same microcontroller subsystems: ADC, PWM, timers, TWI, SPI, UARTs, brown out, clock dividers, sleep modes, .
--S64 has less general I/O (32 to 52? for Mega64); S64 has ~8 "special" I/O (4 A/D; USB; and I forget the rest)
--Both 64k flash; S64 has 16k SRAM vs. 4k for Mega64. S64 would have to emulate Mega64 EEPROM with flash pages.
--Mega64 has external bus interface; none on S64
--S64 has extra peripheral subsystems: SSC that can do I2S and others; DMA; extra UART for "debug port"; full-speed USB; full modem control on one UART, partial on another.
--Both 10-bit 8-channel A/D; S64 is 300+ksps with dedicated external trigger pin
--Same package size & pins QFP64
--S64 is a bit cheaper than Mega64 in qty. 1 & 100

I believe that the AT91SAM7X series which adds Ethernet 10/100 MAC is also supposed to be attractively priced.

So why would one want to use an AVR?

For us, familiarity and having the needed tools is a plus--the app can get out much faster starting witht he AVR. Given the experience level with AVRs, it is really pretty easy to switch models during dev. The converse may be true for experienced ARM shops.

The AVRs have more I/O in the same package, due to the dedicated pins and more complicated power on the SAM7s.

Running with a few MHz crystal makes a sedate design noise-wise.

I think you get a wider range of models to choose from at the low end especially. Below/around US$1 chips like Tiny25 & Mega48 up to the bigger AVRs being discussed.

More supply V & low-power options on the AVRs?

As was discussed in another thread a while back, the cool thing is that even a year ago we couldn't have this discussion. Only in the past year have chips such as the SAM7S and similar Philips models hit the streets so that a comparison as I did above even makes sense. The overlap is still limited, isn't it? Or is there now an ARM7 model that can be lined up against a US$2 Mega8/88--that would be roughly 20 I/O, 1k SRAM, 8k flash?

Lee

You can put lipstick on a pig, but it is still a pig.

I've never met a pig I didn't like, as long as you have some salt and pepper.

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theusch wrote:
Or is there now an ARM7 model that can be lined up against a US$2 Mega8/88--that would be roughly 20 I/O, 1k SRAM, 8k flash?

Lee

Philips LPC2101 seems to fit the bill, although in a bigger package with more I/O.

Jim

Your message here - reasonable rates.

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When Digikey had stock of a few pieces available a few months ago we purchased them (M2560). they are working fine on my board here. Sorry we don't have any extras.

Digikey reports 205 pieces of ATMEGA2560-16AU-ND available right now. in 100TQFP.

DFR

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it seems that even in the new service pack (SP3) of the AVR studio 4.12 the ATmega 2560 isn't supported. Does anyone know when this will be done ?
Matthias