ATtiny 26 Successor?

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#1
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Hi everybody,

I see in the data sheet that the ATtiny 26 is 'not' recommended for new designs. So, I was wondering what is the recommended is the recommended part of similar capabilities.

Fred

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You can put lipstick on a pig, but it is still a pig.

I've never met a pig I didn't like, as long as you have some salt and pepper.

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Well, that was easy. Thanks.

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Yeah, when I'm interested in a chip, I usually go to the manufacturer's Web site. :roll: That way, I can often see what is in the same family, note "sister" models, find the smallest model to do the job, and determine the life status.

But I'm just a fuddy-duddy old guy; I'm sure there are better methods nowadays.

Lee

You can put lipstick on a pig, but it is still a pig.

I've never met a pig I didn't like, as long as you have some salt and pepper.

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theusch wrote:

But I'm just a fuddy-duddy old guy; I'm sure there are better methods nowadays.

Lee

Yupp ... ask Lee :-)

/Bingo

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Quote:

theusch wrote:

But I'm just a fuddy-duddy old guy; I'm sure there are better methods nowadays.

Lee

Yupp ... ask Lee


http://www.lmgtfy.com/?q=%22not+...

You can put lipstick on a pig, but it is still a pig.

I've never met a pig I didn't like, as long as you have some salt and pepper.

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Consider the AVR Tiny261. The Tiny26 was designed as a inexpensive upgrade to the 90S2313 that included a analog-to-digital converter. Its ADC has more features than the standard ADC implementation at the time of its introduction. These features are built-in signal amplifiers and differential inputs.

The Tiny26 has a phase-lock loop feature in its timer-counter that no one understands how to use. This PLL permits the internal system clock to run at 16MHz. Unfortunately, the designers removed the UART and replaced it with the idiotic USI.
After people spend many head-scratching hours reading and re-reading what passes for documentation on the USI, they eventually realize that it is really just an SPI with delusions of grandeur. The USI designers claim that it can be tricked and tortured into acting like a UART, but that is actually a fantasy on their part.
They claim the USI functions just fine as a UART. All you have to do is set it up to send the start bit, and service the interrupt. Then reconfigure the USI for eight data bits, and process another interrupt. And then reconfigure it for a third time to send the stop bit, and process a third interrupt. And then do the six steps in reverse to receive a byte of data. That's a programming nightmare, guys, not a UART. It's easier to make a USI into a flying lawn-mower than make it act like a real UART.
Eventually the ADC, TWI, SPI, Pin-Change Interrupts, and a real UART were incorporated into the Mega48. The Mega48 and Tiny26 sell for about the same price. If you need the PLL and the built-in amplifier with differential inputs on the ADC, then go with the Tiny261. For more memory and peripherals, at the cost of a larger package and slightly higher price, use the Mega48. To combine advanced ADC, small package, and low-cost without a real UART, use the Tiny24 or Tiny25. The Tiny48 has the same package as Mega48, but there is no UART and it is about 30% cheaper.
The Tiny261 has debugWire for use with the Dragon, which the original Tiny26 doesn't have. There is also available the Tiny461 and Tiny861, an pin-compatible upgrade path with more memory on-chip if you have PCBs designed for the 20-pin Tiny26.