ATSAME70: which initialization tool to use?

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I'm new in the Atmel world and I'm starting to take the first steps, so please forgive me if the question is silly.

I would like to use the ATSAME70, I installed Atmel Studio 7 and I started using START to initialize the peripherals and the clock (above all).

Already after a few days I realized some big START defects:

  1. Requires internet connection.
  2. Slow in the selection of devices and settings (perhaps due to the internet connection).
  3. Lack of some peripherical.
  4. Some "advanced" settings are not available, so they are done manually.

So my question is: is there any other tool to configure SAM E70 instead of using START?

I ask the experts of SAM E70 if they use some other tool, if they suggest to insist on using START or if it is better not to waste time and move on to something else.

As for the IDE I do not mind using Atmel Studio, in addition to being free I find it quite complete, so I would not have to move on to something else.

 

Thanks to all

Andrea.

Best regards
Andrea

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Atmel's START (aka ASF4) is a web based GUI front end for a source code template generator.  You select the modules you want, configure them, then press the "go" button and the project source code is spit out.  It's pretty good for getting your project up and running quickly.  But as you have discovered it has many shortfalls - mostly when it comes time to reconfigure the project, especially if you make significant modifications to the generated code.  I've found it's best to archive the generated project.  And then in the future, manually do a windiff between the latest generated template and the archived copy to find the changes and merge just those changes into your real project.

 

One alternative is the older but more stable (less buggy) ASF3.  It works like a more traditional vendor supplied library.  You will need to do much more manual configuration with header files and will likely see a larger code footprint, but it's completely offline and under your control.  No GUI front end for configuration though.

 

Of course you can always skip Atmel's libraries and go with generic ARM CMSIS library.  If you like to roll your own drivers this is a pretty low level interface worth checking out as a lot of the lowest level register definitions are already done for you.

 

All three of these options are free.  And as they say you get what you pay for :)

 

 

Last Edited: Mon. May 14, 2018 - 01:24 PM
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Thanks for your advice.

The main advantage of START is to avoid errors, especially in the configuration of the clock that can cause serious damage.

So of the three solutions, only that of using ASF4 (with START) gives the possibility of a graphical interface for the configuration of peripherals? There is no other tool compatible with CMSIS?

If a peripheral is missing in START, does it mean that it can only be configured in the code using ASF4?

 

Andrea.

Best regards
Andrea