ATMEL Samples

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Hi there,

I see in ATMEL's official site page that they can send samples, but there are no details if those samples could be free like other manufacturers do.

Can I order free AVR90CANxxx samples from ATMEL to my office address?

Thanks,

Michael.

Michael.

User of:
IAR Embedded Workbench C/C++ Compiler
Altium Designer

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Hi,

They will send you free samples. Unless things have changed in the last few years (it's been a while since I've done it!) they go through the local sales office. It could take a while, as Atmel sends them to your local office who sends them to you...

Regards,

-Colin

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Be warned that the samples game could well be a "two way street". If you enter your details and order samples you probably guarantee a contact/visit at some point from an Atmel sales rep wanting to know how big a quantity you plan to use. On the other hand I think Atmel have good "education support" (on the basis that if they can persuade students that Atmel are "good guys" there's more likelihood their devices will be chosen when those students graduate and become design engineers). So you could maybe try making the point that they are "educational samples"?

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We asked for (and got) ATmega2560 samples back when they were scarce as hen's teeth. Our volumes are low-to-nonexistent compared to consumer sales, but our local FAE was very helpful even though the volumes were small.

I wouldn't count them out.

Oh, and it was relatively quick - a week or so IIRC. I remember having them long before DigiKey got them in stock.

If one or two processors will help your development cycle, go for it!

And if you're a hobbyist looking for freebies, well, Cliff's response about "educational samples" is probably appropriate. :wink:

Stu

Engineering seems to boil down to: Cheap. Fast. Good. Choose two. Sometimes choose only one.

Newbie? Be sure to read the thread Newbie? Start here!

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I requested several samples of a few mega's and got them a few weeks later with no further contact from anyone.

Clancy _________________ Step 1: RTFM Step 2: RTFF (Forums) Step 3: RTFG (Google) Step 4: Post

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clpalmer wrote:
I requested several samples of a few mega's and got them a few weeks later with no further contact from anyone.

No offence meant...but maybe they saw your avatar and were afraid to knock on your door :lol:

Ross McKenzie ValuSoft Melbourne Australia

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When I moved over to the AVR from the MC68HC11, I requested samples from Atmel.

A day or so later, I got a call from my local representative. I originally requested 3 Mega8535 controllers on the PLCC package. I was asked about volume, as well. I simply told them that I was a hobbyist working on an Amateur Radio project. I told the representative up front, that I would never be ordering more then a quantity of 10, and that would more then likely be through Digi-Key. I was surprised! I got the 3 sample Mega8525 controllers a few days later.

A day or so after I fired up the target design, I realized that the Mega8535 wouldn't meet my requirements - FLASH was too small. I called the local Atmel representative and explained the situation. Then I was really surprised!!! I received 3 Mega16 controllers, in the TQFP package, again, about 3 days later.

Actually, I've been thinking about requesting some 8 pin AVRs for a quadrature encoder translator - A & B in, Step & Direction out. I just haven't gotten to the point where I fully understand which device will fit the design requirements yet - currently, development is with a Mega644 and the Wizbang Designs controller board.

You can avoid reality, for a while.  But you can't avoid the consequences of reality! - C.W. Livingston

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Actually I have made an order of AT90CAN 3 weeks ago (just turned), but there are no news from this story.

Anyway, guys thanks for your time,

Michael

Michael.

User of:
IAR Embedded Workbench C/C++ Compiler
Altium Designer

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Its hit and miss. I got some samples of the atmega406 and now I'm waiting for at324's

Cheers

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Atmel is very S L O W, and yes when you go through the site the parts go to the local office. My local sales office hates the sample requests unless you are a big company. I ordered samples of the mega128 almost a month ago and all I have so far is an email from the sales office that the request was received.

AS stated earlier, it's hit or miss.

Jim

I would rather attempt something great and fail, than attempt nothing and succeed - Fortune Cookie

 

"The critical shortage here is not stuff, but time." - Johan Ekdahl

 

"Step N is required before you can do step N+1!" - ka7ehk

 

"If you want a career with a known path - become an undertaker. Dead people don't sue!" - Kartman

"Why is there a "Highway to Hell" and only a "Stairway to Heaven"? A prediction of the expected traffic load?"  - Lee "theusch"

 

Speak sweetly. It makes your words easier to digest when at a later date you have to eat them ;-)  - Source Unknown

Please Read: Code-of-Conduct

Atmel Studio6.2/AS7, DipTrace, Quartus, MPLAB, RSLogix user

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jgmdesign wrote:
Atmel is very S L O W, and yes when you go through the site the parts go to the local office. My local sales office hates the sample requests unless you are a big company.

I made the same experience ("you ordered samples ATxxx and ATxxx four years ago, what happens with it?").
You must tell long stories and answer many questions ("whats your project, when it should be finished, whats your future Atmel projects, whats the weather now, ...").

So for now, I like it to order chips for money from shops, which sells single quantities.

I made also the experience, that it was unwise to use to fresh chips, because they may have critical bugs (unable for real usage) or may be removed shortly (e.g. ATtiny22).

So I try only such chips, which are already available at least one or two years for mass production.

Peter

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I ordered some samples of an Atmel ARM chip, as it was not available for purchase, but it was sampling (as many people already had them). Heard nothing for a month or so. Then met an Atmel FAE who helped me choose a different, even newer part, and he had those sent to me immediately. Another 4 or so months passed by and the parts I had originally requested showed up. That was bizarre.

I've placed one or two other sample requests which were completely ignored.

A friend of mine requested samples and a week or so later they showed up in an unlabeled (thus hand delivered) envelope in his mailbox.

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valusoft wrote:
No offence meant...but maybe they saw your avatar and were afraid to knock on your door :lol:

Aww, c'mon... Cute little kitty doesn't bite... much... =)

Clancy _________________ Step 1: RTFM Step 2: RTFF (Forums) Step 3: RTFG (Google) Step 4: Post

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icarus1 wrote:
there are no details if those samples could be free like other manufacturers do.

Atmel sent me four samples (2xATtiny2313 and 2xATmega8) without any problem.

I processed the form on Atmel.com web site and after two days Atmel Italy contacted me to inform that the samples would be sent shortly.

A student without any $$$ is now building his school final project thanks to a sample of these.

Thanks Atmel.

My (HW && SW) Setup: (MyAVR USB Programmer | bread-board | Butterfly | Arduino 10k | ATtiny2313 | ATmega8) && (WinAVR | AVR asm | AVRstudio)

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Hey I didnt even know about this...

I wonder if they have a sales representative in India...hm... =D

An ATmega16 costs like 125 rupees here...approxmately 3weeks pocket money =(

Cheers,
Vyder

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I have a far worse experience with ATMEL in India/Pune.
I was comparing some devices for two new projects.One would require ATmega32 and the other required a Very-Low-PinCount Very-Low-Cost Controller Device.
I made a sample request and as expected, was hounded by distributor(spectraind.com) calls as to my project start date,production start date,estimated quantity..the colour of my eye..!
I explained that I was a consultant/designer and I would help him get good volumes by tying him up with the manufacturer.
Since then I lost contact with him..to Freescales gain.I asked for their 6pin controller devices.They not only supplied 3 samples of MC9RS08KA2 but supplied a development board and a USb dev-kit free of cost!
Now Freescale gets a 50,000 pcs per qtr order for the product..
Just for not letting Atmel miss out,I e-mailed the Atmel distributor(Spectra) guy if he is still aware of my request and he apologised on completely missing out my mail and offered to help me the next day.I also offered to buy the Atmega32 sample parts from him or he direct me to a retailer so that I can buy it from him..Its 2 months now and Atmel's lost it again.
I really was inclined to use AVR because of its proliferation on the net over PIC/TI(which has an excellent sample support).
But things like these forbid me from doing so.
Anyways thanks for reading such a long rant/post. :)

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Getting free samples is important. NXP has quite a few nice chips but its a pain in the ass to get them. I was called by one of their guys. NXP is only interested in huge volume customers and they have the option to get samples through their website (about 25 companies worldwide). Anyway, he got someone to send me samples of a particular chip. I got 25pc and used it in my designs. They have now a customer - although in this case small, but still.
Oh, Bosch in Germany is even worse. They are not even interested in potential customers. I wanted mems chips from them since they were supposed to be cheap and reliable. Rubbish talks about NDA's and forwarding requests to another company and this company was not interested in new customers. I went to Freescale and STM instead. No problems there.

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Instead of requesting AVR samples from ATMEL, I suggest buying a block of 25 of the devices that you are interested in from DigiKey. Then sell the excess devices in blocks of three or five on eBay in the microcontroller section. Ship them inexpensively in small padded envelopes with the ICs inside cut lengths of static-resistant IC tubes.

I have had good luck doing this. I bought 25 each of the Tiny24 and Mega48 in DIP format. I kept about 10 of each and sold the rest in lots of 5 each in an eBay 'Dutch Auction'. The auction was 3 days, the shipping only $2 per lot, and the final bids were all slightly more than what I paid for them from DigiKey (including the shipping charge to me).

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Yes Simonetta, that will work if you are in the US, but I suspect that DigiKey's shipping charges to anywhere outside the US would be prohibitive. I will refrain from retelling my horror story about DigiKey's freight costs to Australia.

Cheers,

Ross McKenzie ValuSoft Melbourne Australia

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Digikey is nice, but not for Europeans....
s/h is expensive
So it would work only if you buy 100's of chips. And then you have to get rid of them...

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Quote:
I went to Freescale ..... No problems there.
You'll be sorry!!

John Samperi

Ampertronics Pty. Ltd.

www.ampertronics.com.au

* Electronic Design * Custom Products * Contract Assembly

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Hi,
Digikey or Future or Avnet is always the next option but the unreal costs that add up for customers other than in the US are surely prohibitive.Prices are almost 70% higher subject to duties and freight,which is $40 for any shipment (when I last heard from Digikey).
So its up to Atmel to be NOT selective with customers.Other than that business goes on ;)

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WEll my Atmel samples of the Mega128 finally arrived after three weeks wait.

THEY WERE THE WRONG ONES!! :evil:

I asked for TQFP and they sent MLF - Totally useless

Can anyone use two?

Oh well, Time to start over

GROAN

Jim

I would rather attempt something great and fail, than attempt nothing and succeed - Fortune Cookie

 

"The critical shortage here is not stuff, but time." - Johan Ekdahl

 

"Step N is required before you can do step N+1!" - ka7ehk

 

"If you want a career with a known path - become an undertaker. Dead people don't sue!" - Kartman

"Why is there a "Highway to Hell" and only a "Stairway to Heaven"? A prediction of the expected traffic load?"  - Lee "theusch"

 

Speak sweetly. It makes your words easier to digest when at a later date you have to eat them ;-)  - Source Unknown

Please Read: Code-of-Conduct

Atmel Studio6.2/AS7, DipTrace, Quartus, MPLAB, RSLogix user

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John, Whats wrong with Freescale?

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Quote:
Whats wrong with Freescale?
As far as I'm concerned they are they are a "chip off the old block", Motorola.

I don't know how old you are or how much experience you have had with Motorola/Freescale.

A few of us oldies grew up with Motorola and were very loyal to them. Unfortunately they will drop a product whithout care of how it affect their clients, whithout a replacement.

How many pin compatible HC08 do you se with th older xx05 controllers? Perhaps the most widely used micro in the world. What do you think all those people did when Motorola decided not to make them anymore?

And what about the HC11? Do you see any pin compatible HC12 taking their place?

We were all forced to redesign our products, at great expense in many cases. They thought we would all be converted to HC08 and HC12, WRONG!!! We started to look for other companies that would not leave you in the lurch. Microchip (even though I hate pics :? ) are a good example of product continuity. Atmel is another.

So you see, many Motorola lovers became Motorola HATERS. I for one, will actively dicourage the use of any Motorola/Freescale products.

John Samperi

Ampertronics Pty. Ltd.

www.ampertronics.com.au

* Electronic Design * Custom Products * Contract Assembly

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js wrote:
Quote:
Whats wrong with Free-scale?
I don't know how old you are or how much experience you have had with Motorola/Free-scale.

A few of us oldies grew up with Motorola and were very loyal to them. Unfortunately they will drop a product without care of how it affect their clients, without a replacement.

How many pin compatible HC08 do you see with the older xx05 controllers? Perhaps the most widely used micro in the world. What do you think all those people did when Motorola decided not to make them anymore?

And what about the HC11? Do you see any pin compatible HC12 taking their place?

We were all forced to redesign our products, at great expense in many cases. They thought we would all be converted to HC08 and HC12, WRONG!!! We started to look for other companies that would not leave you in the lurch. Microchip (even though I hate pics :? ) are a good example of product continuity. Atmel is another.

So you see, many Motorola lovers became Motorola HATERS. I for one, will actively discourage the use of any Motorola/Free-scale products.


In fact, I still have several MC68HC11E2 EEPROM based controllers in the parts bin. I simply will let them lay, until they are needed to replace any that I have in projects that WILL eventually go bad.

Motorola is only loyal to themselves - regardless as to how loyal their customer base might have been in the past.

It was Motorola's screwing me with the MC68HC11E2 that caused me to come over to the AVR. And, I'm not even looking back!

The fact is, I can use any number of AVRs to replace any number of other AVR, in the event that one is issued an EOF.

Case in point... The Mega16/32/644 are all pin compatible. The same goes for the Mega48/88/168. And I am aware that there are many other flavors that share similarities - the Mega64/128. And there are so many others that I'm just not aware of.

In fact, if I'm not mistaken, every AVR flavor has at least one other adaptation that could work as a substitute in a pinch.

Long live the AVR!!!

You can avoid reality, for a while.  But you can't avoid the consequences of reality! - C.W. Livingston

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Also look at AVR historically. Virtually every AVR that has been obsoleted has had a pin compatible replacement, and on top of that, many of those replacements have had a 'compatibility' fuse to make the transition even easier. Not to say Atmel has been perfect,I've had my share of issues with them, but not really any different than what I have experienced with virtually every other chip manufacturer.

Getting back on topic, I've had excellent support from Atmel with samples. I admit it's somewhat easier now, as our quantities are higher, but even in the early days we got samples very easily. At one point we even got a small quantity (10-15) of engineering sample mega103's just so that we could get our prototype approved and certified, and a couple of 'seed' units out the door. At that time we had no history with Atmel, and our projected quantity was only a few hundred units per year. (it was this level of support that made us select the AVR as our primary device of choice in 8-bit micro-controller applications)

Writing code is like having sex.... make one little mistake, and you're supporting it for life.

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In my limited experience, the Atmel sample system is somewhere between "getting better" and "adequate". Now, we are "small potatoes" in volume since most of our industrial apps are low-volume/semi-custom but we have many design-ins for AVRs. A lot will depend on the supply chain in your area. There are disti offices fairly close by, and we have relationships with them. The rep is also close by, and is competent and attentive. The regional Atmel office "knows" us.

So when I really want/need a few of a chip, one of the above can usually help. Cultivating those contacts has a benefit: The distis and/or rep may know of another user in their territory and can sometimes borrow/steal a few.

But from reports, it isn't that way all over.

Lee

You can put lipstick on a pig, but it is still a pig.

I've never met a pig I didn't like, as long as you have some salt and pepper.